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  • depth of features

    ok another dumb question from thepeanut gallery. How do you determine the depth of a feature? not like for caricuture carving where basically anything goes, but for a real life like carving? All the book I have show the pictures and to some degree I can guess, but like how far should the nose stand proud of the face to be accurate? none of the books I have show that. to some degree I understand its up to the artist, but there should be some rule.
    lenght of nose, depth of eys all kind of leave me guessing.

  • #2
    Re: depth of features

    Go on line and see if you can find some directions. I have a book but it would take some time to find it. Check with Smoky Mountian Woodcarver Store in Townsend TN. to see if they have one. They sell a lot of books on different subjects like this. His name is Mac and tell him Doris told you about him.

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    • #3
      Re: depth of features

      As you may have seen in my carvings, anything goes!
      If I wanted to do an accurate human face, I think I'd stand in front of a mirror with a ruler and record some measurements. A frightening prospect to be sure.
      Try Using Google for "human face" then select Images. Click on the thumbnails for bigger images and measure things right on the computer screen.
      Google the name of someone that you admire, select images again and make measurements.

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      • #4
        Re: depth of features

        I just bought a book called "Drawing the Human Head" by Burne Hogarth. I bought it at the half price book store for $10. It covers proportions, head types, structure, anatomy, aging, facial features and movement. Best $10 i have spent i think. I am finding I am understanding more from the drawing books than the carving books.

        Here is a link to the book on amazon
        Drawing the Human Head (Practical Art Books): Burne Hogarth: 9780823013760: Amazon.com: Books

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        • #5
          Re: depth of features

          To be totally accurate, you would need to take measurements from the actual model, as a number of life-like carvers do. I think you will develop a feel for it after you've done a few. If you look at it in profile and say to yourself "that nose looks too short" then. . . fix it. There is usually enough "room" in the wood. A very well-know carver, who I'm proud to call "friend" told me that once. After thinking it was a smart-a** answer, I thought about it, tried it, and he was right. Guess that's why he's one of the 'big boys'. Seriously though, your own eyes work pretty well at comparing things. Have fun!
          Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
          My etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/Widdlenspit
          My fb page: https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...8.100000156660 683&type=3

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          • #6
            Re: depth of features

            got a book at the library (see free) that is excellent. Human Proportions for Artists. anyway to answer the nose question, you measure the nose from the tip to the brow and the nose stands proud half that distance. Just thought I'd share. If there are any other gems in the book when I read thru it I'll post to be neighborly.

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            • #7
              Re: depth of features

              the author by the way is Avard Fairbanks and Eugene Fairbanks.

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              • #8
                Re: depth of features

                Don't forget, that, as stated above, the nose is half on the face. Meaning, the distance from the nose tip to the lip is half. The other half, meaning the nares, nostrils, breathers, whatever, are on the face itself. There is also a wealth of info on line. Just do a google search on "human proportions", or "human facial proportions" and you should find a bunch. Have fun and enjoy.
                Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
                My etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/Widdlenspit
                My fb page: https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...8.100000156660 683&type=3

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