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Purchasing Wood (review)

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  • DiLeon
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    I've had, what the owners called junk wood, tossed into my front yard at night in the rain = just to get rid of it.....>>>>>>They throw it out of the trucks, over the gate into the driveway. This happens to me a lot....they call it junk wood here also....meaning often it can not be used for top of the line furniture. I get great wood a lot as the word is out I want it. If I want basswood I order only Heinecke Wood Products as they are great about the shipping to the islands and wood plus service is outstanding over the years.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Me? I sort of agreed to accept the wood as they wanted to clear it off their country property! I guess it eased their conscience to know that it all went to a good home instead of into the fireplace. Just the other day, the guy asked me if I wanted more.

    But, you still have to ask around and don't stop. Nobody will advertise for you.

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  • medicinedog
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Robson, I agree! I have found that gifts of small carvings just to let people know that I am a carver does wonders. I have recieved a few return gifts of aspen, cedar, and pine and we have a lot of wood that is blown down by storms that everyone is very willing to give for the asking
    but what I am really looking for is something with pretty grain to it for a fish carved and left natural. Larry

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  • mpounders
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
    This is the way it works: You make the original roughout and send it to them. They duplicate the roughout you made, so now you have multiple copies of your original roughout to sell or do whatever you want with them. That's why they say they don't sell roughouts: they just make duplicates of your roughout.


    Make sense now?
    What Arthur is saying is that you can bandsaw out a spoon blank or roughly carve a spoon and send it to Heinecke and they can mass produce the item for you as a roughout, in multiples of 8 (because they have an 8 spindle duplicator). If you just want to buy spoon blanks or roughouts that someone else designed, them you have to buy those from that person or a company that resells that person's roughouts, not Heinecke. You can find spoon blanks and roughouts at Smokey Mountain Woodcarvers and Pinewood Forge among others.

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Originally posted by JohnnyT View Post
    ok so let's say I wanted just blanks. no design. just a block of wood roughed with a spoon shape. No design. that's what I'm trying to get across but i don't think i'm explaining it well.

    he talked about the spindles they use but those are duplicators. it wouldn't make a lot of sense to me to make actual duplicates would it? i just want blocks that are roughed to i don't have to spend so much time taking down all that wood i don't need.
    This is the way it works: You make the original roughout and send it to them. They duplicate the roughout you made, so now you have multiple copies of your original roughout to sell or do whatever you want with them. That's why they say they don't sell roughouts: they just make duplicates of your roughout.


    Make sense now?

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  • kdispoto
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    I've never been disappointed with Heinecke.

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnnyT
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    ok so let's say I wanted just blanks. no design. just a block of wood roughed with a spoon shape. No design. that's what I'm trying to get across but i don't think i'm explaining it well.

    he talked about the spindles they use but those are duplicators. it wouldn't make a lot of sense to me to make actual duplicates would it? i just want blocks that are roughed to i don't have to spend so much time taking down all that wood i don't need.

    Leave a comment:


  • SlowMover
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Johnny T....they produce and sell roughouts, but only to the creator of the original pattern. They are where the sellers of roughouts like many of the artists in the CCA and other carvers that teach classes have their stock made.

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnnyT
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Originally posted by snickerbocker View Post
    Heineckes did our roughouts for over 15 years and we never had a complaint, they are great people and are a joy to do business with, highly recommend them.
    i'm still trying to figure out how to get roughouts there.

    Twice i've asked and i don't quite understand the answer. this is what they said (i was hoping to order 10 or even 20 spoon roughouts)

    We do not sell any roughouts.
    If you carve something we can make roughouts out of it for you.
    We have an eight spindle machine so we like to do 8 or multiples of 8 at a time.
    Let me know if you have more questions.
    so they don't sell roughouts but they can sell roughouts. I don't quite understand what he meant.

    so i'm not sure what this means.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Other than the dirt, the real puzzle with old wood is that the ends are more than likely going to be cracked quite badly and WRC is no exception.
    Shake blocks are 24" long, width and thickness varies to get around knots.
    My rule of thumb is that at least 4" on each end is useless, some I see 16" to carve, others might be as short as 12".
    Same with the birch 6/4 and 8/4 mill cuts that I can buy. Some are solid right to the ends, some are split 6" into the plank (but I can use either side of that.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Yeah, they do (or did). All I have to do is ask and they'll do it again.

    For years, I scavenged wood from logging debris piles up along the mountain logging roads. Really muddy but you still have to get there before they torch off the piles.

    Anyway, in conversation, I learned that some folks outside of the village had piles of old western red cedar shake blocks that didn't get sold off. I must have said something like I could use those for carving and thought no more of it.

    Cold, cold, pouring mountain rain one ugly night. Looking out the next morning, there was a dozen blocks! So old, some had moss & green algae growing out of them.
    The sapwood had been shaved off with a Log Wizard (chainsaw attachment).

    Right now, I'm just about ready to finish a dish carved from an 18lb block. The dish looks kind of clunky but it weighs less than 3lbs with more to go!

    Leave a comment:


  • snickerbocker
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Heineckes did our roughouts for over 15 years and we never had a complaint, they are great people and are a joy to do business with, highly recommend them.

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  • JohnnyT
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    people toss wood into your front yard?

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    Lar: it's a lot of asking around, everybody you know who might know somebody else who knows somebody else and then there are days you get lucky.
    If you don't get the word out, nobody has any reason to know that you're looking for wood.

    I've had, what the owners called junk wood, tossed into my front yard at night in the rain = just to get rid of it.

    I hope to show you a result soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • medicinedog
    replied
    Re: Purchasing Wood (review)

    But what if you wanted to carve in cherry, butternut, sycamore,cypress knee,or some of those woods. Is there a source for those? Lar

    Leave a comment:

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