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  • Fur texture?

    I searched but did not have much luck. What do you use to create fur texture? Wood burner? Mini gouge? Anything to speed up the process?

    Thanks
    Dean

  • #2
    Re: Fur texture?

    This recent thread may give you some inspiration.
    http://woodcarvingillustrated.com/fo...6-Bear-in-Snow

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    • #3
      Re: Fur texture?

      I have used a White wheel stone to create hair or fur, and a \"V\" tool is helpful also.
      Larry

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      • #4
        Re: Fur texture?

        After carving the main main texture, sometimes I use one of my sabor burrs at a extreme low speed & lightly dust over the previously mention texture, just make it is a a sloooow sped. . .JoeB
        . . .JoeB

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        • #5
          Re: Fur texture?

          The first things to consider in carving fur: Are the hairs short or long, is the fur rough or smooth, thick or thin. The second and most important item is to pencil in the direction of flow for the fur. Do not slack off on the pencil marks. Make them close together and all over the carving. Follow this direction and keep it in mind as you create the fur.

          If I am carving smooth hair/fur such as on a horse, I depend mostly on the burner. If the fur is thick such as on a bear, I do my first work with a white stone (I use both a cone shape and a flying saucer shape. I carve only with the edges of the stones, so keep a lava stone nearby to clean off burns and reshape the edge. The secret is to vary the stonework in length, depth and direction of stroke always maintaining the direction the fur is flowing. To add thickness use the stone to bring two cuts to form < with the open ends in the direction of the flow. Keep looking for areas where too many strokes ended at the same point making a ridge or line.


          After the stoning, I do essentially the same thing with the burner, repeating everything in the above paragraph.


          If I am carving hair such as the mane on a horse, or want the fur to be raised such as the fur around the face of a fox, I do a lot of knife work to form clumps and changes of direction. I then do essentially the same thing in the two above paragraphs.

          Once the fur/hair is formed if to be left unpainted ─ the work is done. If the piece is to be painted ─ I use a hand held brass wire brush and go over the whole carving to remove as much of the charred wood as possible. After the wire brush, I use scotchbrite on a mandrel and a real slow speed on the micro motor to continue removal of charred wood. The work done by the stones and burning wheel are now clear and provide an area for the paint to rest without losing too much texture.

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          • #6
            Re: Fur texture?

            WOW! Thanks for the tips. Guess I need to look in to getting white stones. Thanks all. Much appreciated.
            Dean

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            • #7
              Re: Fur texture?

              Dean
              as with all processes, thee are many way and means of creating a effect. Pau as given you some great tips. Use this philosophy to determine the placement and flow of the hair.
              You can not only use a stone as indicated above but you can create a similar affect using a mini palm \"V\" or parting tool as well as a gouge. These will create something similar although similar.
              Were I you, I would try each of these methods on a trial piece or scrap and see which works best with your carving method.
              Personally, I use a combination of a 60 degree parting tool with a small #9 gouge for my pieces. I have also used a burner in the past. Don\'t limit yourself to just one method. Use what is best for the piece.

              Bob

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              • #8
                Re: Fur texture?

                Paul, where do you get your white stones and lava?
                . . . JoeB
                . . .JoeB

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                • #9
                  Re: Fur texture?

                  Joe, I bought a white stone kit years ago ─ before I knew better. As is true with most kits the majority of the stones have been used so little that I have never needed to use the abrasive rock. I am considering replacing a couple of those I use a lot and have researched suppliers. The best source for individual white stones, I have found is

                  www.jaymescompany.com

                  they are listed at $2.25 each. The ones that I prefer are listed as
                  ─ Abrasive Stone White - Inverted large
                  ─Abrasive Stone - Taper large
                  ─Abrasive Stone - Cylinder #5
                  ─Abrasive Stone - Disc #4

                  I have 2 lava (pumice) stones that are about 1 inch long by 1/2 inch square. I have had them so long that I have no idea where I got them. I did a little research and found pumice stones on several online stores (most were for cosmetic purposes - removing rough skin). I do not see why one of these would not work. I bought some ceramic texture sticks about 10 years ago. Paid a lot of money and hated them. I suspect I bought the lava rocks with them as they require dressing far more often than the white stones. I also found that the white stones do better.

                  My use of the lava stones is to remove build up of material from the wood and to keep the edges as sharp as I can for making fur. I push all of the tools ─ other than the disc ─ straight down onto the rock to keep the end flat and then clean up the sides.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Fur texture?

                    Thanks for the reply, got it bookmarked.

                    Even a blind pig can find an acorn if the rot around long enough .

                    I found this site http://sugarpinewoodcarving.com/
                    They have the white stones and the cleaning stones.

                    But I agree with you about buying a set, it is good to have your recommendations as to what stones that are most frequently used

                    Thanks. . . .JoeB
                    . . .JoeB

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