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Edged tool vs power carving!

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  • Edged tool vs power carving!

    Since I do not enter carved pieces into competitions, I have a question. Are pieces that are carved with edged tools, judged in the same category as power cared pieces?

    If they are, or aren\'t; what are your thoughts on this?

    Tom H
    http://beginnerscarvingcorner.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

    Tom, I do not enter any competitions either, just the enjoyment and to keep busy.

    I use both. and I have found they both, to do a good job, take skill. Like I said I carve for the enjoyment of it. . .JoeB
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

      I have not done a show for a long time. But I never saw a separation of the two while I was doing them. I know all the carvers I know today use both unless they just have hand tools.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

        I entered one competition, Helvie knife handle competition. I would like to see knife only (whittling) as a different category.
        Buffalo Bif
        bflobif.com

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        • #5
          Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

          A long as the carver is guiding the power tool, I don\'t see a great difference. I\'ve tried a little of the power carving, and perhaps with the exception of bosting, I don\'t care for it...I like the slower, quiet use of hand tools, hearing the sound of a sharp blade moving through the wood...rather contemplative. If I were carving for a living, I know I would feel differently, but then it would be work and not pleasure. To each his own.
          Arthur

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          • #6
            Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

            BfloBif, you\'re not sayin there is a difference between power carving and knife carving are you?

            Arthur, you sayin you don\'t see a difference between the two since the carver is guiding each tool?

            Don\'t take offense anyone with my comments and questions. I am merely trying to get some answers to question that I have long not asked nor had answered. That and trying to get some lengthy and meaningful dialogue going.

            Tom H
            http://beginnerscarvingcorner.blogspot.com/

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            • #7
              Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

              I do not enter carving competition, but what I observe is many who want to break the contest into more categories to eliminate some perceived advantage by those who do it differently vs those who want it all judged as one activity, i.e. Best of Show. Wood carving includes a wide variety of styles, methods, tools, etc.

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              • #8
                Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

                I\'ve been doing 6 shows/year for a few years, some that have competitions and others that do, including Dayton. I haven\'t seen a power-carving category yet, only rough-out categories and instructor-assisted categories. It would be hard to imagine serious caricature carvers doing much power carving. I don\'t power carve; nothing against it but I really enjoy making chips.
                .
                Matthew

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                • #9
                  Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

                  I tend to think of \"power carving\" as the technique which finishes (or nearly so) the the entire carving process. Some very talented people working in antler, bone, bark and wood in my district.
                  Personally, I\'ll use whatever tools, power or otherwise, to bash off the big chunks, to get me to the point where I can settle down with hand tools to finish the carving.
                  Brian T

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                  • #10
                    Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

                    Tom I do not know about meaningful; but lengthy is something with which I am very familiar. Diana claims that my postings would be far more brief if I could deliver them orally with appropriate facial and hand expression.

                    More to the point, and my opinion of comments involving competition. I love woodcarving shows as an opportunity to view carvings and to socialize with other woodcarvers. I never have, and never will, enter a carving into competition.

                    My objection is to the quality ─ or lack of quality ─ in judging. This is not meant as a criticism of the individuals; but, of the system. I have yet to attend a competitive show with categories not ranging from chip carving, relief, animals, birds, caricatures many with several iterations of the genre. I have also yet to attend a show with more than a single judge. Inevitably through lack of qualifications by a judge or insufficient entries, I have seen quite a number of carvings with undeserved ribbons. I really believe that perusal of Chip Chats by any experienced group of woodcarver would reveal agreement with the statement I just made

                    The most egregious situation of an unqualified judge occurred to a friend. Elaine Mouser DVM, came up to me and said, Paul, I hope you have a bird identification book with you. I told her that I had one in my car and she said, Would you get it? The judge is refusing to allow me to enter my Indigo Bunting claiming there is no such bird. I was stunned, WHAT?. She repeated the problem and emphasized the urgency as the first call had been made.

                    We got the book and made it to the judging area before final call. All to no avail! The judge took a look at my bird book, out of curiosity I suppose. He then advised, I am from New Mexico and we do not have these birds there. I would not have any idea how to go about judging this carving! Show officials supported the judges position.
                    Dr. Arlene was a fantastic carver, holder of multiple blue ribbons, and was an instructor of bird and animal carving. She died a few years later I do not know if she relented on her vow to never enter another competition but I do know that she never attended this show again!

                    Why do shows limit the number of judges? Why do they not qualify the judges in the category for which they are accountable? If dog shows do it why not woodcarving shows?

                    I suspect that Pallin has a very valid point in categories being designed to eliminate a perceived advantage by those who do it differently. Specifically apropos to this discussion ─ edge tool versus power ─ I think should this be done the only thing that would be fair to all concerned is to add carved with some power, carved with power only, carved with assistance by power saws, carved from one piece of wood, etc. to most of the existing categories.

                    As stated in the beginning ─ brevity is not my strong suit.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

                      I should have added a mea culpa to my post. For me the finished product that I dreamed is the ultimate goal. I enjoy edge tools and will use them whenever I can. But, I will not redesign a piece so that it can be finished with edge tools only. I have never and doubt that I ever will complete a carving with edge tools or power tools only.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

                        Hi Tom. First to define whittling- knife in one hand piece of wood in the other- limitations on tools and size too. I think that is different than power carving or even carving with multiple tools- knives gouges, sandpaper, mallets, etc. Multiple bits for a power carver, multiple gouges, vee tools etc are similar disciplines. I recognize and embrace that the knife has limitations (at least it does the way I carve).

                        I DO NOT look down on power carving. I have two chainsaws, a merlin power carver, and an off-name-brand rotary carver- they are wonderful tools and I have seen some wonderful art created with them, and I am in awe those artists.

                        I can see the following categories of woodcarving as separate disciplines: power carving, chainsaw carving, relief carving, chip carving, multiple tool carving, and whittling.

                        Painting is another discipline, one that maybe should be judged separately from carving?

                        Did I miss any?

                        How would a judge know what tools may or may not have been used?

                        When does the rough out end and carving start?
                        Last edited by Buffalo Bif; 02-29-2016, 06:34 PM.
                        Buffalo Bif
                        bflobif.com

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                        • #13
                          Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

                          Arent all competitions broken down into categories? do break dancers compete with ballet? quarter mile cars with nascar? There is room for a best in show at Crofts- right after they finish best in class...
                          Buffalo Bif
                          bflobif.com

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                          • #14
                            Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

                            I\'ve never entered a competition so I really don\'t know. I\'ve never had an interest in using pwer tools for carving, except for bandsawing and drilling. I know some guys use those little sanding disks mounted on a dremel for finishing. Does that count for power carving?
                            Terry

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                            • #15
                              Re: Edged tool vs power carving!

                              14 posts to this thread from 10 different members! We\'re getting there...

                              TomH
                              http://beginnerscarvingcorner.blogspot.com/

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