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  • #16
    Like it a lot. You should carve some more of this style!

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    • #17
      He looks great Steve.
      Carve On,
      Kadiddle

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      • #18
        joepaulbutler, no, It's the base coat I use on all my carvings. BLO, Raw Sienna and Yellow Ocher. It reminds me of the woodcarvings I saw in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. To your other question, mostly I paint with acrylics due to the quicker drying time. I do love the look of oils on wood, and the ones I do for my wife I use oils.
        This one was done with oils Several years ago. It is near life-sized.
        SantaLg.jpg
        Last edited by Steve Reed; 11-20-2021, 01:02 AM.
        Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!

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        • #19
          That a good Santa Steve. I didn't phrase my question very well, I was wondering if the paints you used with the BLO were oil or acrylic
          . . .JoeB

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          • #20
            Very Nice Steve! I have a question similar to Joe B. I have always sealed my carvings with BLO, painted with acrylics, then antiqued with watered down burnt umber acrylic. I started thinking about better ways to do the antiquing and I came across an old post you had about your BLO mixed with raw sienna and yellow ochre. I am going to try this with thin acrylic washes on top to allow the antique highlights to show threw. Is that what you usually do? Also I have never been happy with acrylic flesh tones. Just wondering if you use your BLO mix as your flesh color? Have you experimented with any other colors to tint the BLO? Any other tips are appreciated. Thanks.
            Jack M

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            • #21
              Jack M, not to jump in on your question to Steve, I still waiting to see what his reply will be.
              I'll let you know what I'm doing right now....I paint my carving with acrylic paint, using "flesh tone" after drying overnight I buff it with lt, gray non-woven abrasive pad. I then add the antique solution 1"burnt umber oil, 30ml mineral oil, get the oil paint well dissolved in the mineral oil, then add 60 ml BLO.

              Like I day, waiting for Steve answer, always use more arrows for my quiver
              . . .JoeB

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              • #22
                Joepaul, Yes, I use the BLO and oils that I mentioned as a basecoat for all my carvings, whether I'm using oils or acrylics. Jack Moran, that is exactly what I use. As far as flesh tones go, it depends on the wood. Some look just fine with only the base coat. Like most of you, I'm less than pleased with the commercial "fleshtones", so I have an almost empty bottle of "Caucasian Flesh" that I lay down first. I thin it down so that it's real transparent. (A quick note, if you're thinning your paints I find that using an acrylic medium, and water, looks good. Sometimes if you thin with just water, the paint can dry "chalky" looking.) I'll evaluate it after a while and either do another coat of the same mix, or use "Highlight Flesh" thinned down to make things lighter. I then go back and use the CF again for areas like under Santa's Hat, under the nose, and the temple areas. This works for me. I think building up layers of color give a depth to the carving. Just my $.02. Experiment for yourself and see what works for you. If you look at my post 'nother Santa, this is exactly what I used.
                Steve
                Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!

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                • #23
                  Looks great to me Steve!! Nice work!

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