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  • #31
    Well, in my opinion it's a two faces coin : on one hand you can define volumes and shapes before starting a carving, but then there is a temptation to stick too close to the model, and reefering ti it too much.
    at some stage you must forget the model.

    The advantage is modelling allows to add or remove material until you're happy with it.
    Also some might say it is not advisable to goo too far in details for a study, as your eyes will focus on them instead of the general shape... that's an other trap I fell in often ^^
    As the clay begin to dry, you can set very fine details if you want to.

    Take my recently carved pike :
    i did 2 clay models,
    a model of the head, with details.
    and a model of the general shape of the body, as i wanted it to be twisted and wavy.

    I was more confident when i started to remove the waste on the log.
    But at some point i left the model to avoid taking measurments and reefering to it all the time.

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    • #32
      Thank you. The use is understandable. I gave away a carving some years ago = Raven Stealing the Light, The first Raven with the box of light in it's beak.
      I want to carve another but somewhat larger with a wider (left-to-right) body and head. I will make one and change the body shape.
      Brian T

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      • #33
        if it's in the round you may need to build a solid 'skeleton' for a clay model to avoid clay to collapse under it's own weight.

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        • #34
          [QUOTE=copeau;n1092077]Well, in my opinion it's a two faces coin : on one hand you can define volumes and shapes before starting a carving, but then there is a temptation to stick too close to the model, and reefering ti it too much.
          at some stage you must forget the model.

          The advantage is modelling allows to add or remove material until you're happy with it.
          Also some might say it is not advisable to goo too far in details for a study, as your eyes will focus on them instead of the general shape... that's an other trap I fell in often ^^



          * I agree and if I was to do a complete clay model with heavy detail, I would lose the desire/excitement doing it as a wood carving.
          I think clay can be a very good tool to figure things out and pretty quick too. I just have to try not to do more than what I need... to get my answers.
          Last edited by GregGerard; 09-30-2016, 08:58 PM.
          Greg

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          • #35
            Thanks Copeau & GG: To carve another Raven for that story, it's the bulk body mass that I think that I need to see.
            The details, as few as there are in cedar, will take care of themselves. I have those in my mind, already.
            I have some coat hangers that I can cut up for an armature.
            Brian T

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            • #36
              Awesome job, simply awesome.... what else can I say.
              ~ Dwight
              "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

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              • #37
                Thank you Dwight !

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                • #38
                  Wonderful carving, I too am in awe of your talent.
                  Joe

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                  • #39
                    Thanks Joe !

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                    • #40
                      Always love your work-Such fabulous efforts!

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                      • #41
                        That's some very fine work. Expertly done.
                        Brandant Robinson
                        Woodcarving Blog - www.theoldstump.blogspot.com
                        Custom Folding Knives - https://www.therobinsonedge.com/
                        Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/brandant.robinson.1

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                        • #42
                          Thank you Keoma, comments much appreciated !

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