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WIP salmon relief...

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  • WIP salmon relief...

    Hey all I’ve recently put my two resent homebrew carving knives to use adding details to one more copy of our P.N.W. First Nation peoples carving, a salmon.

    The finished color combination will be black, red and green. The wood is basswood and measures 5/8” x 3-5/8” x 13”, the salmon relief is 1/4” proud of the background surface.

    C&C?

    WIP salmon.jpeg



  • #2
    Good. Your carving is really smooth and curved. Better than mine. Those knives are magic.
    Given the design of the eye, you'd be better off with North Coast (Haida, Tsimshian, Tlingit) red, black and white paints.
    Green is Kwakwaka'Wakw Mid Coast but that would mean changing the eye to look in a direction rather than being centered.

    You ever consider using seashell or copper as inlay for things like eyes?
    Brian T

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    • #3
      This is a situation where the eventual use of the relief may determine the final colors and details. Brian (Robson Valley) is correct in the distinctions between various Pacific NW artforms, but if you are not representing your work as an example of a particular tribal group, you are free to do as you like. I have done several carvings in the Pacific NW First Nations style, but have intentionally mixed design elements because I am not a First Nations artist. It should be obvious to knowledgeable viewers that these carvings are "outside the tradition."

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
        Good. Your carving is really smooth and curved. Better than mine. Those knives are magic.
        Given the design of the eye, you'd be better off with North Coast (Haida, Tsimshian, Tlingit) red, black and white paints.
        Green is Kwakwaka'Wakw Mid Coast but that would mean changing the eye to look in a direction rather than being centered.

        You ever consider using seashell or copper as inlay for things like eyes?
        Brian, happy you appreciate my carving and thanks for your comments.

        The First Nation art work that I see and like, I try and mimic as close as I can, color and all. There original colors are a big part of what makes them attractive to me.

        I see I errored giving credit to the wrong area this style of artwork represented. My apologies, from now on it's just "First Nation".

        Did I inadvertently mislead about the use of my 2 homebrew carving knives? They were used to "chip cut" the accents in the carving, not the whole carving.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pallin View Post
          This is a situation where the eventual use of the relief may determine the final colors and details. Brian (Robson Valley) is correct in the distinctions between various Pacific NW artforms, but if you are not representing your work as an example of a particular tribal group, you are free to do as you like. I have done several carvings in the Pacific NW First Nations style, but have intentionally mixed design elements because I am not a First Nations artist. It should be obvious to knowledgeable viewers that these carvings are "outside the tradition."
          Pallin, thanks for your comments.

          Nope no misrepresenting here. I even mark any such work as "Non tribal art" even if I don't intend to sell it. Case in point. Selling any non-tribal art items as tribal art is illegal and a federal crime. With very,very stiff penalties. If I interpreted my source correctly you can copy/make such items but don't try and sell it as original tribal art.
          Source:http:// https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Arts_and_Crafts_Act_of_1990

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          • #6
            Nice relief carving looking forward to seeing it painted.

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            • #7
              The best popular reference for the art and carving styles of the Pacific Northwest native communities is:

              Learning by Designing. Pacific Northwest Native Indian Art by Jim Gilbert & Karin Clark, vols 1 & 2.
              Hundreds of illustrations, side-by-side to show the styles of North Coast, Mid Coast, South Coast and West Coast.
              There are even drawing lessons!

              The gold-standard reference books are probably those by Bill Holm, such as Northwest Coast Indian Art,
              and just about anything written by Hillary Stewart, such as "Cedar."

              I found these and many more in the process of researching a small 4-figure pole that I inherited.
              Dead end beyond MidCoast and pre-1955. Beautifully carved, might be a week before you find any knife marks.
              If the carver's name is on the pole, it's in the style or hidden in a figure somehow.

              Brian T

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              • #8
                Finally have the salmon painted. I would have liked to have matched the red and green colors closer to the original but I didn't quite get a match, yet. Still like the results though.

                FWIW, after posting this image I noticed the green looks more aqua in color then a green for some reason.

                0514171427-01 (640x211).jpg

                ​​​​​​​

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                • #9
                  Beautiful work Frank! Very nice.
                  Terry

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                  • #10
                    Oh this is REALLY beautifully done. The smoothness is very appealing and colour choice is brilliant. It's truly stunning Frank.

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                    • #11
                      Clean, Frank. The choice and placement of the head colors is just right.
                      Brian T

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                      • #12
                        Well done, Frank!
                        Arthur

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