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The Incredulity of Saint Thomas

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  • The Incredulity of Saint Thomas

    As many of you know, I am not one to try to hide my inadequacies or one that is afraid of placing his ignorance in full view of my friends on the W.I. forum. I think that the full value of this forum is not realized unless a person, such as I, is willing to expose all of his flaws and inabilities in order to learn and take his carving to another level. What better way is there to do that than to draw on the skills and knowledge of some of the better carvers here??

    With that said, I'll jump right in and show you what I am working on and humbly ask for any help or insight you can give me here as I attempt to carve my rendition of Caravaggio's painting of "The Incredulity of Saint Thomas". Incredulity 004.JPG It is a small carving - 8" x 10". This may be my initial mistake!

  • #2
    We all have our inadequacy's , our flaws, weaknesses and skill levels. I am happy that you have the courage to display your work here, as I do, so we can learn and improve. Saying that, I cannot point out anything in this piece that I would offer as a improvement, much too soon. You look to be on track to me. Keep up the good work.

    Bob
    Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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    • #3
      It looks to be coming along quite nicely. I'm looking forward to seeing the progress on this one.

      Tom

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      • #4
        Cottonwood, your skill far out classes mine. I think you are doing a wonderful job and will be interested in seeing it finished.
        Larry

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        • #5
          This is truly a learning site, boy be afraid like you were the first time your invited a girl or boy out
          . . .JoeB

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          • #6
            Hi Millard,....It is the only way to learn how to do it... make tons of mistakes and learn. Hopefully, you will learn a few new tricks with each work. In art school all the way up .....that was the theme...those teachers wanted masters works and they would even throw your work in the trash can. No joke.....after a while you learn it is part of the whole process. I am forever looking for what can I do better.... Love your subject matter....great start.
            Last edited by DiLeon; 06-28-2018, 09:48 PM.
            . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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            • #7
              This isn’t the kind of carving I enjoy doing but man it looks like you’re off to a great start!!! Please post photos as you complete it!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by squbrigg View Post
                We all have our inadequacy's , our flaws, weaknesses and skill levels. I am happy that you have the courage to display your work here, as I do, so we can learn and improve. Saying that, I cannot point out anything in this piece that I would offer as a improvement, much too soon. You look to be on track to me. Keep up the good work.

                Bob
                I can't add much more than Bob has said here. You may, as you have already noted, pay a price for the diminutive size of the piece in achieving all the fine details, but having seen other works by yourself, this should be something, I am certain, you can solve quite readily. Such a nice work to try to emulate, and like others, I really anticipate seeing the progress and final result. Great start.

                Tinwood

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                • #9
                  Millard (Cottonwood) - Your feelings of humility while doing a relief carving of a subject "borrowed" from the work of a grand master (Caravaggio) is understandable. JJF has been showing us his work on "Padre Pio." I have been doing reliefs of M. C. Escher's designs for over forty years. But be careful! Perhaps the greatest woodcarver in English history, Grinling Gibbons, was discovered when he was carving Tintoretto's "Crucifixion" in his modest cottage in Depford in the 17th century.

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                  • #10
                    Pallin, my friend, I don't think that I have anything to worry about, but will keep the shades drawn just the same.

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                    • #11
                      Like life I have only grown in my carving though trial and error Cottonwood. As well as the grate tips and guidance from those who share their talent and knowledge, often members of the forum who share their skills with everyone. I applaud you work so far. I am not much of a relief carver but admire the skills required to do the job you are doing.
                      We live in the land of the free because of the brave! Semper Fi
                      https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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                      • #12
                        Having admired your work for several years and captured a few photos you have put on here, I have no doubt you'll pull this off extremely well. For your sake, I wish it was double the size, just to make it easier on the small details I know you will define on this carving. As for help, yeh--right, I might say be sure and hold the camera steady so I can see the detail more clearly---big grin! You got this one too.

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                        • #13
                          In a work of that size and complexity, a lot must be suggested rather than obsess over details...in effect, use it as inspiration rather than attempt a slavish reproduction. Each medium has its inherent characteristics and limitations, and any attempt to replicate a work of one medium in another medium must make modifications to accommodate those differences if the work is to be successful. Just MHO.
                          Arthur

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                          • #14
                            Fantastic piece of work!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
                              In a work of that size and complexity, a lot must be suggested rather than obsess over details...in effect, use it as inspiration rather than attempt a slavish reproduction. Each medium has its inherent characteristics and limitations, and any attempt to replicate a work of one medium in another medium must make modifications to accommodate those differences if the work is to be successful. Just MHO.
                              Arthur C. makes a good point. If we consider the eventual placement of a carving, some of the detail may be "wasted." If it hangs on the wall ten feet from the viewer(s) the details you slaved over from one foot away cannot be seen. On the other hand, a good relief will draw the viewers closer. They may want to actually run their fingers over the details.

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