Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help please, is this how to do it?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Thanks again for all the help. Funny, Dwight, I made the same experience with the Pfeil knife!! Great idea on the driller! I will keep posting the final. Thanks Robson on the wood and the tools, I will look for this crooked knife, sounds interesting actually. I watched some videos on YouTube and realized they use quite different tools. Cheerio, Elke

    Comment


    • #17
      I thought I'd share this, I just fell over this book and this sculptur, Andrew Thomas. He uses diamond rotary burrs, by hand. I attached a screenshot of the page. Kinda interesting.
      You do not have permission to view this gallery.
      This gallery has 1 photos.

      Comment


      • #18
        Yes.. I use rotary burs all the time, along with ruby burs and ceramic stones. All work great for woodworking.
        ~ Dwight
        "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

        Comment


        • #19
          I use them in a bur removal handle, easier to hang on to
          . . .JoeB

          Comment


          • #20
            Oh, now that is a great idea. I was wondering about how to even hold or apply pressure enough with these burrs. Handles makes total sense! Thanks!

            Comment


            • #21
              Elke, do you not use a Dremel or some such tool with your burs?
              ~ Dwight
              "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

              Comment


              • #22
                One thing....basswood fuzzies....bring me to hair pulling fits. Some people swear they do not have an issue but I hate basswood because of this issue. I use a Dremel on basswood for details, diamond burrs, and stones to produce a smooth surface.. The I have sanding sticks that go to a 500 grit.....tons of sanding will get rid of almost all of them. I have micro tools which I use to cut off the ones that are stubborn. I have used a wood burner on fuzzy wood areas. Perfect angles take time....lots of it....I use extreme small chips using a knife and then I sand down to where I want. It is noted with sanding.....and the reason why most carvers do not sand....if you do a good job it will take as long as it did to carver it ....to sand it. Nothing is fast ....unless you have carved the same thing at least 25 times.
                . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

                Comment


                • #23
                  Another way is with a bar-b-que lighter, very carefully . or you'll be sanding of the burns
                  . . .JoeB

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Hihi, on the burning. I probably would set it on fire!! I don't have a Dremel, but that might be a good idea to get. What Dileon here describes is exactly what I am going through. I also have superfine rasps, that helps in small areas. I am sanding way more on that thing then carving. And every time the light hits it differently I see new things, ugh. I'll let it be now, and just put sanding sealer on. Then finish. Will post when done!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I am lucky if I can get the bark of the wood, let alone carve anything realistic, anyway a Dremel is a good starting point. I started with a box knife, then bought a good knife, than a dremel and now a foredom... work your way up.
                      Last edited by Dwight; 12-16-2018, 06:11 PM.
                      ~ Dwight
                      "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Alright, I am done. I put on three layers of Deft sanding sealer. It did act a bit like thick wax in pieces and sealed nice little holes, but not all of them. I read that I have to completely sand off the whole sealer so it just sticks in the holes. Which makes sense, but I found that article after I had the third layer on. I only sanded a bit but not the whole sealer. Then in end I put beeswax&walnut mix on. I bought that for cutting boards. I just did not want to spray anymore. I think I am still having problems with white residue on wood, which I assume is the dust. Probably could have done a better job sanding out the little holes, but I carved this in three days and sanded for 5 days, I am not joking. Time to move on. Thanks everyone for the help!
                        You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                        This gallery has 2 photos.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          you will find that for inspecting it, you will be the one who is most critical. as for me? i absolutely love your carving. it is very very good !
                          Denny

                          photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Hi Denny, thank you! I actually have not seen any carvings done by carvers in real, except an Austrian sculpture from my mom, so I don't know how precise cuts need to be and so on. Still learning here... Have a great day!
                            Cheerio
                            Elke

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Have you ever tried these radial bristle discs? They are Scotch Brite made by Foredom, in three different sizes, (3/4", 1", and 2"). They produce quite a variety of grits: Brown (36), Green (50), Yellow (80), White (120), Red (220), Blue (400), Pink (1,200), Peach (3,000) and Light Green (14,000). I use them often, especially on ornaments with beards or fine lines where it is difficult to sand. They get rid of those nasty fibers quick and easy. The 3/4" is used in my Micromotor Foredom, the 1" in my Foredom SR, and the 2" in my electric drill. The only problem is they wear out quickly, but the price is reasonable, so I just figure it into the price of what I sell.

                              Bob

                              You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                              This gallery has 1 photos.
                              Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X