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First major Lichtenberg burn

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  • First major Lichtenberg burn

    Well, it has warmed up enough that I can open the sliding door and turn a floor fan on.
    It is a 2-1/2' x 3-1/2' table with the leaves extended. Type of wood, I have no idea. but so far it has not been that easy to burn.
    I've basically been working on it in the afternoons, 4-5 hrs. It took we 1-1/2 afternoons to get the one leaf done. I was using the probes and was having a heck of a time getting it to burn. The top isn't one solid piece, it is glued up pieces of 2-1/2" wide, varying lengths, about 1" thick. when I tried to burn, it would do a branch burn once a while, but mostly it was just want to burn straight up the grains,

    I got a short piece of metal about two inches long, removed one of the probes and clamped it to the table, and started adding the electrolyte with a spray bottle, a spitter. Seemed to work better. When I went to work on the next side, I got a piece of 24" x3/4" x1/8" brass strip. Clapped to the table used the spray bottle and in 1/2 an afternoon got the other side done. What is interesting how neat of a burn line it left where the strip was clapped down, got to start work on that area this afternoon.
    The third picture should be the first

    notice the febreze
    Attached Files
    joepaulbutler
    Senior Member
    Last edited by joepaulbutler; 04-10-2019, 05:27 PM.
    . . .JoeB

  • #2
    The burn patterns are great and shame the wood type isn't known. Kind of hunting blind but you are sure diligent and it pays off for you. Wonder if there is any correlation between regular wood burning and the lichtenberg burns? Meaning, in pyrography hardwoods usually require a hotter temperature or long pen exposure to get a decent burn.

    I really like the pattern and are you going to augment it with other items/painting, inlays, etc.?

    Nice effect!
    Bill
    Living among knives and fire.

    http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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    • #3
      Here's the end of day 3, The "X" comes in where the leaves come down. Tomorrow Drag it outside scrub the scoot out of the burns with brush and water, let dry, then bleach it. after it dries, wash it again, let it dry, sand, then apply the finish, with [probably polyurethane..
      Attached Files
      . . .JoeB

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      • #4
        Can't wait for the final finished pictures!
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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        • #5
          Nice job on the burn. Looks like you got nice depth and detail with it.

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          • #6
            Thanks, guys, will be able to tell more after the scrub and wash
            . . .JoeB

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            • #7
              Quite interesting JP, but, be careful dude, that thing will leave a mark if you aren't!

              Tinwood

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              • #8
                Here are the results of day 4. Scrub the burns, bleach the wood, rinsed, sanded and wipe with mineral spirits. Will let it dry overnight then add some Wipe-On Poly. Then back to the 4-seasons eggs.
                You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                This gallery has 2 photos.
                . . .JoeB

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                • #9
                  Your whole process just amazes me! I am absolutely loving your results.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks, Sammy, got the second coat of wipe-on poly this morning, will give it a third this afternoon, then take a look
                    . . .JoeB

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                    • #11
                      That is coming out very cool Joe. Glad you didn't get fried. Tom
                      If I took the time to fix all my mistakes, I wouldn,t have time to make new ones.

                      www.spokanecarvers.com

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, Tom, ya, you don't want any distractions & work a routine that you do will burning. Sure wish I knew what type of wood or woods this table top has in it. have given it fours coats of Wipe-On Poly
                        . . .JoeB

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                        • #13
                          wow, you have much more control over what is and what isnt affected by the burn, more than i woulda guessed. looks like you have a built in ahead of time talent for that type of art !
                          Denny

                          photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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                          • #14
                            Thank you Denny, but I'll tell you, you don't have much control over where the electric wants to go, it can be controlled, but only within a narrow area of control.
                            . . .JoeB

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                            • #15
                              It's great - electric goes to the path of least resistance. That is the end of my considerable knowledge in this.

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