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A journey into ship modelling.

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  • A journey into ship modelling.

    Time to get off my *** and get back to what I do best, ship model. This journey will take some time, probably a year or more, it is no over night project. For those who have followed along before, fasten your seat belts and get yourself a good drink, hot or cold and enjoy the ride. Ask any questions that you may like, this project is as much a teaching exercise as a carving exercise. The vessel is a French frigate of the period 1745, of the 8 pounder class, based on the draughts of the frigate La Renommee, but the vessel will be of "Le Castor", built in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, by the master shipwright R.N. Levasseur, at the Royal Dockyard.

    Bob
    Attached Files
    Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

  • #2
    Bob, it's always a treat to see your ship projects unfold. Thanks for sharing them with us.

    Just out of curiosity, where do you find the plans for your historical ships?
    Arthur

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    • #3
      It will be fun to follow and watch as you proceed, Bob. I built a few model ships from kits and they taxed my limited abilities. I will vicariously build yours with you. One of my ancestors was a captain on a whaling ship and he would be gone two years. He did some basic wood carving and some scrimshaw work...not building ships though. I do get the urge to build a copy of one of his whaling ships...maybe I'll try someday.
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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      • #4
        Hi Bob , gona be another fine Ride with you on another Ship Building Ride . I'm Comfortable and have my Drink and ready to go . Build on . Merle

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        • #5
          I will be following!
          Herb

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
            Bob, it's always a treat to see your ship projects unfold. Thanks for sharing them with us.

            Just out of curiosity, where do you find the plans for your historical ships?
            Arthur, The draughts for this ship come from a publication in France, Ancre, from a gentleman who wrote a series of books on French vessels built in France over quite a period of their sailing navy. The French have massive documents on their building history still in existence, so he researched the plans and redraw them for commercial use and sale. A number of English authors have done similar work of English or captured vessels , as their National Maritime museum have wonderful collections of their vessels, all available for copy and sale. There is a wealth of information available on just about any nations historic vessels if you know where to look. The American collection is housed at the Smithsonian. Canada has some in various museums, as do nations like Holland, Sweden, etc.

            Bob
            Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

            Comment


            • #7
              Great start, Bob - I'll be following the action.

              Claude
              My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

              My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

              My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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              • #8
                Me too. I always enjoy the process. What is the wood you are using for the hull?

                Bob L

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Just Carving View Post
                  Me too. I always enjoy the process. What is the wood you are using for the hull?

                  Bob L
                  The under hull I am using Clear/Select White Pine, from our local building supply store. It will be covered with Pear wood planking on the hull and Maple for the deck. The framing will be of Basswood, that part will be from the water line up. This method is called a combination method, half "bread and butter" and half "plank on rib/frame".

                  Bob
                  Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ok. Thanks Bob! I thought it was pine and was surprised. But I forgot you have the planking to do.

                    Bob L

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                    • #11
                      Continued to shape the hull today, got it roughed out and am ready to start sanding to get rid of the tool marks. Have the bow and stern shaped and ready for the keel to be installed. Have the deck sheer marked and will begin cutting away waste wood tomorrow to shape the deck. There is quite a tumblehome to this vessel, as it was built in the mid-part of the 18th century, about 1745, and a French design. She was the fastest frigate of her day, and would do 15 knots. While that may not sound fast, for that period it was ballistic! LOL

                      Bob
                      Attached Files
                      Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bob, please explain the term "tumblehome."
                        Arthur

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
                          Bob, please explain the term "tumblehome."
                          "In naval architecture, the tumblehome is the narrowing of a ship's hull with greater distance above the water-line. Expressed more technically, it is present when the beam at the uppermost deck is less than the maximum beam of the vessel." - Wikipedia

                          (Sorry if I stepped on anyone's toes)
                          Last edited by Unclescott; 08-06-2019, 12:39 PM.
                          Carving since 2017

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                          • #14
                            Good explanation Unclescott, in other terms, it is the fat part of the hull closer to the waterline and as the side of the ship goes up, it gets narrower closer to the deck. I'll see if I can find a picture to show it.

                            Today I spent as all good carvers do, sanding! Sanding, sanding, and more sanding! The hull looks better now, nice and smooth, ready for planking. Or it will be as soon as I cut the deck sheer, which is higher in the bow, sweeps low in the center, and rises higher in the stern. You can see the line I marked on the side of the hull where it will be cut.

                            Bob
                            Attached Files
                            Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This photo I marked to show you where the Tumblehome is. The tumblehome will be even more increased as the ribs are added and the sides of the ship rise higher.

                              Bob
                              Attached Files
                              Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                              Comment

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