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  • Santa on a diet

    I'm making a Christmas scene as a gift for a friend of mine. Plan on doing a tree, some presents, maybe a reindeer, and mounting the bigger pieces with dowels on a rough, wood round (I have plenty of downed and dead trees on my place; I live on a farm)

    Anyway . . . this was the first piece. Figured Santa might be the toughest (most prone to suffer catastrophic mishap) so wanted to finish him first and take my time with the rest over the next few months.

    About 15 inches tall . . . and he could use a meal.

    Oh . . . a question. I see a lot or people mentioning finishing and/or antiquing after painting (using boiled linseed oil, Watco, tung oil, Danish oil, choose your poison). Is there a reason folks do this, other than personal preference in terms of appearance? Protection? Do these acrylic paints tend to chip, fade, etc?

    Thanks

    My Musical Instrument Website: http://www.ronmarr.com

  • #2
    Mrs. Clause isn't being as nice to him as you were.

    "finishing and/or antiquing" In my opinion, these are a personal preference sort of thing. If I use one of the oils you mention on a carving, I leave it with just oiled, no paints. Antiquing gives the color of the carving an added dimension, as it sounds aging it. You'll need to do some experimenting on your own to come up with YOUR style, just my 2ยข worth
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      Nice Santa there and great idea about doing a scene. Antiquing a piece will reduce the brightness of the colors and make it looked aged. Linseed oil will also protect it from the weather.

      Watch any of the paintings of a carved figure that Doug Linker does and you will get a good idea...although he uses an off the shelf acrylic antiquing solution. SImilar effect. The boiled linseed oil and a dab of oil color is cheaper than the antiquing solution...and I like it better, Rontana.
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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      • #4
        joepaulbutler

        Thanks. I've worked with a lot of finishes doing musical instruments (nitro, French polishes, lots of Tru Oil, etc) but acrylic paint is new to me. I think I'll experiment on some smaller pieces, before using anything on Santa.

        Woodburner

        I appreciate the tip on BLO and oil. Will give that a try on some pieces.
        Do you know if something like a Deft satin is compatible with acrylic paint? I may end up wanting to keep this Santa a bit brighter.
        Sometimes the Internet has too much info, and I'm seeing a lot of contradictory opinions on Deft +acrylic
        My Musical Instrument Website: http://www.ronmarr.com

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        • #5
          I've done a lot of oil painting and just started with the acrylics a few years ago, and that was because of all the carving books suggesting it. Many (most?) use a BLO and add a touch of raw or burnt umber to it. Not much at all. The BLO does have a very light color to it, so maybe start with just that and see if you get the desired effect. I'd just paint some of the acrylics on a piece of spare basswood then try variations of the BLO and add raw umber to it, in various amounts. I use about a pint of BLO and about a dime's thickness of raw umber right out of the tube.
          Bill
          Living among knives and fire.

          http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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          • #6
            Nice carving Rontana. First off, the antiquing is a personal preference thing and primarily is used to tone down the brightness of the paintwork and to produce an aged appearance. The acrylic paints are quite tough and durable. I think you will find that they have a long life and really do protect your carving work as well as provide a more interesting piece of work. For your final coating I would recommend you use a matte finish acrylic spray and then you won't have any compatibility issues. Minwax matte finish is an excellent choice for protecting your work and doesn't seem to have any adverse effects once applied over acrylic paints. That's my buck-three-ninety-five's worth and I'll step off the soap-box now.

            Tinwood

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            • #7
              I really prefer to use washes of paint (watered down...) on my carvings, but my customers seem to prefer them to be brighter colors. I only use BLO on carvings that will remain unpainted. Personal preference...

              Claude
              My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

              My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

              My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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              • #8
                Woodburner
                I'll try that soon. Am working on one of Doug Linker's little bears . . . so that'll make a good experiment

                Tinwood
                I really appreciate the Minwax matte suggestion, and the info on acrylics. That's a huge help.

                Claude
                Thanks . . . I imagine I'll try both/all as time goes on. Still just getting my feet wet with carving and painting, and really don't even know what I don't know at this point. But, I'm learning a lot via the generous help on this forum

                My Musical Instrument Website: http://www.ronmarr.com

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                • #9
                  The two latest additions to my Christmas scene.

                  Just curious, does anyone have any thoughts on where to find simple reindeer patterns - or better yet - a tutorial?
                  My Musical Instrument Website: http://www.ronmarr.com

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                  • #10
                    Nice additions. Look at these results for your reindeer ideas/patterns/tutorials: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=gene+messe...=v177-1&ia=web
                    Bill
                    Living among knives and fire.

                    http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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