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  • Pumpkins

    I finished up the last two pumpkins in my little pumpkin party. These are a carved out of a 2 x 2 block of basswood, the little one out of a 1x1 scrap. This is my first attempt at painting and antiquing. I’m not too sure about the results. The antiquing looks rather splotchy. Maybe I should’ve put two coats of paint on before antiquing. Well, I’m going to call them done and move on to something different.
    Thanks for taking a look, comments always welcome.
    Mike
    13071C6A-8F4C-44FB-80E3-17FBE1ABE8F9.jpeg

  • #2
    Hey Mike, Your "beginner" style has me beat for a lot of Items..Those are great looking pumpkins.
    Chuck
    Chuck
    Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

    https://mewe.com/profile/5d6f213642db757a5dfb3223

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    • #3
      Nicely done, Mike. Great textures...I'd be proud of it for sure.

      How did you antique it...I don't see a problem.
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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      • #4
        Thank you Chuck, I appreciate the comment.

        Comment


        • #5
          Agreed. Nice looking pumpkins.

          Comment


          • #6
            Bill, thank you. I’m going to add a couple of photos. I turned one of the pumpkins around so you can see what I mean by splotchy. I also took a photo of the stuff I picked up to antique them. I’m thinking maybe the basswood needs to be sealed or primed somehow before painting. Or perhaps two coats of paint before antiquing, or I let the antiquing sit for too long before wiping it off. I did also lightly sand with 120 after they dried. Well, first try…

            A30F44CB-C761-4A98-B6DB-0F0D13FED1C6.jpeg
            968F7EFA-8A93-42BB-AF4F-718DF826AA2C.jpeg
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Hi Mike , did you seal over the Painting before Antiquing ? If not I think that's why you got Blotches . Still a good Job . Merle

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              • #8
                I think that antiquing is the approach that Doug uses and I have never tried it...so no help here. I use boiled linseed oil with some raw umber in it and then thinned a tad. It is very forgiving and I just apply it on liberally (basswood and butternut) and it gets soaked into the wood, no wiping. Never noticed a problem with mine...at least in my eye.
                Bill
                Living among knives and fire.

                http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                • #9
                  I think maybe you might have needed a little more paint and be sure it is dried. I use a similar product, with good results. Hey man you're off an running that is the important thing, I wish my first ones had met with the same results as yours
                  . . .JoeB

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                  • #10
                    Hi Merle, no I didn’t seal after painting. What sealer would you recommend?
                    Bill, yes, I was following Doug’s video. He had a tutorial for carving a pumpkin with a face, I left the face off but followed his paint and antiquing suggestions. Are you applying your BLO and raw umber over a painted carving?
                    JoeB, thanks for your kind comment. Yes, more paint and wait for it to dry. You might have hit the nail on the head. I’m impatient and might have pushed the process, perhaps too eager for the next carving.
                    Thank you all for your suggestions.
                    Mike

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                    • #11
                      Mike, you can apply the BLO and raw umber mixture over the painted carving. (For a darker antique look, mix a tiny amount of burnt umber with the BLO.) When I need to seal my painted pieces, I just use a matte polyurethane spray.

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                      • #12
                        I use the same antiquing medium once in awhile. I don't let it sit after applying...rub it right off. I also find that I can control where I want and don't want the antique to be with a damp cloth or paper towel. Also, sealing after painting with a spray lacquer or polyurethane is not a bad idea.
                        Keep On Carvin'
                        Bob K.

                        My Etsy page: https://www.etsy.com/shop/rwkwoodcarving


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                        • #13
                          Sammy, Thank you. It seems as if BLO is the "go to" product for a lot of those here on the forums. I'll get some and give it a try. Is the burnt umber an oil painters tube of paint, or something different? Thanks for the tip about the urethane spray too. Looks I've got to go shopping.

                          Bob K., Thanks for the tips. I may sand these down a little and start over. It was my first attempt, always a learning curve. I think if I would have sealed them first, like several folks suggested, they may not have ended up with the splotchy look. I don't know, I'll keep trying...

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike WNC View Post
                            Bill, thank you. I’m going to add a couple of photos. I turned one of the pumpkins around so you can see what I mean by splotchy. I also took a photo of the stuff I picked up to antique them. I’m thinking maybe the basswood needs to be sealed or primed somehow before painting. Or perhaps two coats of paint before antiquing, or I let the antiquing sit for too long before wiping it off. I did also lightly sand with 120 after they dried. Well, first try…

                            A30F44CB-C761-4A98-B6DB-0F0D13FED1C6.jpeg
                            968F7EFA-8A93-42BB-AF4F-718DF826AA2C.jpeg
                            As I see it Mike, there wasn't a problem with the antiquing, the problem came about when you tried to sand the piece. The sanding highlights the 'cut' facets that you created when you carved the piece. These are the high points on the carving so you sanded off the antique material revealing the original color and not the toned down color which appears after the antiquing is applied. But that's just the way I see it. If anyone has a different opinion then let 'er fly! I'd be interested in finding out myself.

                            Tinwood

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                            • #15
                              I see what you're saying. What do you think of this idea... I seal them with BLO (without sanding), repaint, and then try the antiquing again. Do you think that might work?
                              Mike

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