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  • #16
    Originally posted by Merle Rice View Post
    Hi Di , Boy when you decide on a Project you go all the way and the sign of a Artist . One comment though, I'm not to sure about the Size on a 16" Pueo . What the Hell is a Pueo ? Ha,Ha. You got my interest . Merle
    I just went and got my facts....about the size to make sure I did it right. Pueo wingspan from 33.5 inches to 40 inches extreme 45 inches. The body with tail length 13.4 inches to 17 inches. Via the University of Hawaii information.

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    • #17
      Hi Di , that's what I thought . smile . Merle

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      • #18
        Getting wood for this project was not easy....finally resources came through,... it was between camphor or Hawaiian primavera. Primavera was in the shop and being cut to size yesterday. It has been a long wait but worth it. I did not want a dark wood which is all I have on hand right now. primavera.jpg

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        • #19
          I am back in the studio ....I dug out myths of the Hawaiian Pueo.....it really gave me what we call here chicken skin or English goosebumps. The last time I worked on the owl was February and then the pandemic hit. In the myth the Pueo appears as a warning of things to come, providing safety in times of danger. So I am making a Pueo...and here comes a pandemic...wow talk about timing. Perhaps the Hawaiian spirts are talking to me in my sleep?? It has been a hard year, and lost my shop cat a few weeks ago, we are in lockdown, ....but the shop is clean and I am starting again. Hopeful nothing else bad happens. Right now I have to decide if the legs are folded back against the body or coming out.

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          • #20
            Hi Di, hope you make the right Decision on the Legs or you won't be able to get around . Ha,Ha. Glad to see you are back to making Chips . Gona be watching your Mind and Hands working . Merle

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            • #21
              Di - I admire the way you have approached this owl project: gathering information, sketching ideas. And it's driven by a personal experience. The overall project may have many starts & stops, but I sense a strong drive on your part to make this one of your best. We'll be watching. . . Phil

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              • #22
                Keep us posted with frequent photos of the progress, Di. I love to see your work!

                Claude
                My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                • #23
                  Love the photo I did quite a bit of bird photography and it takes a lot to pull off a shot like that. Good luck with the project. Will be watching with interest.

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                  • #24
                    Owl basic shape is cut on the bandsaw. I spent the day study owl anatomy. Meaning looking at bird bones all day long and study the whole thing. Which is a must if I do not want to look like a fool..... Nothing worst than putting your work in a show and someone goes
                    hey you put the legs on wrong the only way that the legs would look like that is if they were broken.


                    Bone structure matters a lot of time even when you can not see it. I took an anatomical drawing class, we had to learn the muscle and bone structure of human being ....meaning the final test was a real skeleton put into a position and you had to draw the whole thing with the muscles on it in the right position. It was not a fun class. But you learn, bones and muscles matter if you want to do the basic 3 D the right way. Pinterest has
                    today
                    wonderful anatomy drawing photos and diagrams, so lots of resources. I have an illustration book on owls and tons of pictures for references and google research. For someone who has never see an owl up close, this will have to do. I am not looking for 100 percent perfection, as an artist, I may change a few things for design reasonimages.jpg but it will be by choice and not non-education. This photo is a wing of an owl found on Pinterest. It shows where the joints are, where I can bend things and the direction of main feathers.

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                    • #25
                      Holey snicklyfritz. I have been off line for a while and love owls too. You have my attention. Plus I have a wonderful native Hawaiian gal friend that lives here in the Tri cities WA. one of her sons just started carving,, and get this 2 months ago sent me a picture of his first carving??? Yes his rendition of the Pueo, and his mom had seen one when she was a child. Of course I just had to look up this wonderful bird and found out the rarity of it also.

                      We have just moved into this home this past month and one of the neighbors told us one of the professors or teachers would come to our large Spruce trees and observe an Owl that would roost it one of them. Then just the other evening on the deck the wife and I were sitting there having a drink and this large owl came swooping through.. .. I can hardly wait to see your progress and great job so far on those drawings too.
                      Good luck
                      Chuck
                      Chuck
                      Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

                      https://mewe.com/profile/5d6f213642db757a5dfb3223

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                      • #26
                        I like your choice of Primavera, really neat wood, then I like to carve mahogany. I hope you have carved some of that before?? Sometimes that interlocking grain can be a bit frustrating. Are you planning to woodburn the feather detail or are you going for a softer look? Sorry, Wednesday is always question day...
                        I found that using a woodburning tool, kinda like a cautery tool, to burn some of my boo-boos, was a huge advantage. Have a little misstep and the cut wants to "glide" and cut a little deeper? Burning it will level it out without fear of cutting deeper. If you are going to paint? The singe marks won't matter. Good luck and please post progress pics.

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