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Guitar D28 build

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  • #46
    Just finished watching the video, What are the braces made from? Didn't know if you sent it to Jeff or not, but I sent the video address to him. This is quite a process, Thanks for sharing
    . . .JoeB

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    • #47
      Hi Glenn , On the Neck , are they Flying Eagles ? If so ,a God name for the Guitar would be , Flying Eagle Guitar . Just Saying . Ha,Ha. Merle

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      • #48
        Hi Joe,
        The braces are made of top quality Alaskan Sitka spruce as this wood is one of the best in the word for transmitting the vibratios thet create the sound over the top. I am keepin Jeff in the loop. I asked him if he was going to have a go at a build but he said he didn't have a workshop as yet. I told him to take a break and go visit Dad and beg to use HIS workshop for a while hehehehehehe.


        Hi Merle
        You are right on the money mate. I decided to build my guitars with bird themes. The archtop was humming birds this ones Eagles. I think your eagle thing is rubbing off on me hehehehehe. Hey with this guitar I am just going to HAVE to learn to play Hotel California by the EAGLES hehehehehehe.

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        • #49
          Hi Guys
          The top is now finished as good as I can get it. Note that the tone bars have all been trimmed down and shaped to a rounded triangle profile. Doing it this way reduces weight, increases top response and doesn't lose strength in the brace. Note that the outside edges of the braces are trimmed down to almost paper thin. This in creases flexibility and respone in the top. Some tap tone notes were the same so the braces were trimmed until one of the notes changed to a new one. where the braces fit into the big x brace the tone bars were trimmed to improve resonance and tone qualities.

          When done I had 14 nice musical tap tone notes coming from the top with a good ring to them. This should make it REAL good if the guitar building theory proves true.

          The back Is not generally treated with the same degree of care as the top as the top does most of the work in creating the sound. I want to wring every good note possible from this beast so decided to treat it the same as the top.

          I thinned the wood to 100 thou as per the specification and glued on the bracing. Result was a dead sounding back on tap tone test. I thinned out the braces and the tap tone improved considerably and I started to get a bit of a ring from it but I wasn't happy with it. Working on the theory of just keep going until it doesn't get any better I then started thinning down the top a thou at a time by sanding. It got way better and was ringing nicely by the time I got down to 95 thou. It is amazing what 5 thou can do to tone and response on these things. Its the difference between make or break.

          To give you some idea of the different density of the two woods The Sitka top is 125 thou thick weighs 298 grams. The Pau Ferro back at 95 thou weighs 454 grams

          The total weweight is 652 grams which to put thing in perspective is slightly less than two 330 ml cans of beer.
          Attached Files

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          • #50
            Hi Guys
            Back after a successful hunt.

            Have started bending the sides of the body. The Pau ferro is real hard to bend so I'm kind of glad that I went a bit far with the sanding of the sides. Rule of thumb is about 90 thou for sides at max and 65thou at min. I'm pushing the boundaries a bit here at 50 thou at the tight bends of the top of the body to 75 thou at the base of the guitar.

            To bend it I use a butane burner shoved into the end of a piece of stainless steel pipe 40mm. I get it hot enough so that if you put a few droplets of water on the pipe it sizzles and bounces off. I then thow a piece of old water soaked towel over the pipe and roll the wood over it until the steam penetrates and brings the wood up to temperature where it starts to become pliable.

            It is then clamped into the mold so that as it cools, and any water left in it evapourates, It will settle into the shape of the mold overnight and become fixed in this position.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by Glenn Jennings; 02-15-2021, 09:16 PM.

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            • #51
              I'll stick with a cigar box ukelele if I ever try to make a stringed instrument. It sure looks like you got things well in hand
              . . .JoeB

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              • #52
                Hi Joe,
                Oh come on you know you like a challenge hehehe. As for having things in hand I sometimes think it is more good luck than good management going on with some of these projects. This is a sharp learning curve type project. Everything I do I have to figure out how to go about it for the most part. I certainly have a lot of how do I put this right moments hehehehe. The feel /instinct thing we talked about plays a big part in things.

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                • #53
                  Hi Guys
                  Got the sides bent to shape and the neck and tail blocks glued in The neck block has to be spot on as both the thickness of the top and the body sides where they fit in behind the neck affect the fitting of the neck dovetail join. I spent a lot of time making sure I got the neck block right on the centreline of the guitar body.

                  With the sides all clamped in place The kerfing was glued in place and held in place with clothes pegs. Rubber bands are wound around the end of the peg to give it more clamping power. They work very well for this application.

                  Tomorrow the top of the side will be sanded level. Then the top can be fitted and glued in place.

                  That's about it for now.

                  Cheers
                  Glenn
                  Attached Files

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                  • #54
                    Hi Glenn , that is quite a Process with all the Clamps and Jigs that are needed . Your Patience for Detailing and Guitar making Remarkable . Looking good . Merle

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                    • #55
                      Your patients and attention to detail on this is commendable. Interesting process, and explains why some instruments are so pricey. You must have really good hearing to know when it is where you want it. It is going to be a beautiful piece! We will need a video of you playing an Eagles song.

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                      • #56
                        Kep, my cigar box is looking better and better. All the effort you're putting into the rackle, I'm betting a great tone will come forth!
                        . . .JoeB

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                        • #57
                          Hi Merle,
                          Thanks Buddy.

                          Hi Sappy
                          Thanks buddy!! It is all in the lap of the gods as to how she will sound. Yoyu can pick good quality wood and of the types that will give you the sound you hope to get. But it all hangs on the getting the top dead right. I think I got it pretty good but the jury is out until the strings go on.

                          Hi Joe
                          You can only do your best and pray a lot for a happy outcome hehehehehehe.

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                          • #58
                            Glenn, that is really a great looking progress, wow, think ill invest in some clamp stock, never seen so many in one picture.
                            Mark N. Akers
                            My Etsy Store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/KarolinaKarver

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                            • #59
                              I'm enjoying following this. Thanks for sharing your expertise with us.
                              Joe

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                              • #60
                                Hi Mark
                                You can never have too many clamps hehehehehe. It is a long process as all has to be done by hand and that takes ages.


                                Hi Joe
                                Glad you are enjoying following the build. As for expertise this is the first guitar of this type I have built so is a case of the blind leading the blind if you know what I mean hehehehehehe. A real case of learn as you go but that is the challenge and it keeps the brain ticking over. hehehehe.


                                Hi guys
                                Well today was a bit of a trail of oops!!!! Forgot to fit the side bracing before I glued the back on and then found I had taken out the slight curve the back was supposed to have in it in the sanding down to fit the body to the back.

                                Had a look at my Martin EC and the Takamine acoustics and neither of those have side bracing anyway so have decided to go without and if I look to have any issues I can put some in later. Will be a pain but can be done.

                                Well the Tap test with the body glued up sounds to be as good as any of the 3 quality acoustics I have so as the politicians say " I am cautiously optimistic of a happy outcome at this point"

                                I did rememeber to glue a piece of cloth over the centre of the x brace as recommended and Before I glued the back on I coated the entire inside of the body with a shellac solution to seal it up against humidity. This is important with the wood thickness on this build being pushed right to the limits.
                                Attached Files

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