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  • Goose bowl

    DSCN8899.JPG
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  • #2
    Interesting project what kind of wood?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Nebraska View Post
      Interesting project what kind of wood?
      Hi Ed!

      Its my grandpas idea RIP he made one maybe 25 years ago and said its the first and last one he would ever make ahah he used to make hunting decoys but the goose bowl as far as i know is the only one ever made but a lot of animals are made into bowls i plan on making others for sure.

      Its eastern white pine thats been sitting for 2 years big cut worms and bacteria have gone threw it but its still intact and a bit moist hence the more or less even edges and bottom to resist cracking.

      This one will be a gift.

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      • #4
        That should clean up very well. Beginning to look a little like the magnificent food and feast dishes which are carved by First Nations here in the Pacific Northwest.
        You need to make a couple of crooked knives to make finishing easy.
        Brian T

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        • #5
          Help, I'm a little thick between the ears. I don't make the connection between the two pictures. will the bowl be the bottom of the goose?
          . . .JoeB

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Brian T View Post
            That should clean up very well. Beginning to look a little like the magnificent food and feast dishes which are carved by First Nations here in the Pacific Northwest.
            You need to make a couple of crooked knives to make finishing easy.
            Hello Brian thank you that is one of the nicest compliments i could ever get because i think native art 'formline' i think its called is amazing and from videos i seen of totem pole making,masks and bowls i consider it all one of the best art forms ever and a lot of these carvers are some of the best in the world.
            I respect the fact its art they created and dont do it myself as i am not native descendant but maybe some day i will work with them it would such an honor.
            Yes crooked knives are on the menu if i don't make them i will get those crocked blades on lee valley and make handles.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
              Help, I'm a little thick between the ears. I don't make the connection between the two pictures. will the bowl be the bottom of the goose?
              Hi Joe you got it and the neck will be screwed inside the bowl, The angle on the bottom neck will make it so the head is strait up.

              Neck and head is two parts for grain orientation.

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              • #8
                Eric B: before you buy PacNW FN crooked knife blades, shop around.

                The new kid, Jamie Sharp, is in Mission, BC and is making some good tools, finished, for a very reasonable price. I have a couple. They needed tuning up on the edges. So be it.
                https://www.jamie-sharp.com/

                Kestrel is a leader but their delivery times have slowed to a crawl, partly Covid and partly popularity.
                http://www.kestreltool.com/
                I'd buy a 'C' blade, haft that and see how I got on. It's a really big blade.
                Both Jamie and Crescent Knife Works (Lee Valley) blades are 2/3 that size. Which for a dish is OK.
                Dish 06.JPG

                Frog E.jpg
                Brian T

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                  Eric B: before you buy PacNW FN crooked knife blades, shop around.

                  The new kid, Jamie Sharp, is in Mission, BC and is making some good tools, finished, for a very reasonable price. I have a couple. They needed tuning up on the edges. So be it.
                  https://www.jamie-sharp.com/

                  Kestrel is a leader but their delivery times have slowed to a crawl, partly Covid and partly popularity.
                  http://www.kestreltool.com/
                  I'd buy a 'C' blade, haft that and see how I got on. It's a really big blade.
                  Both Jamie and Crescent Knife Works (Lee Valley) blades are 2/3 that size. Which for a dish is OK.
                  Dish 06.JPG

                  Frog E.jpg
                  Good evening Brian

                  I did not know crooked knives could be so big thank you for the heads up!

                  Kestrel looks like the real deal did you have any trouble ordering from the states?

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                  • #10
                    Really like the concept of this piece . Will be watching with interest. Best of luck with the project!!

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                    • #11
                      Over the years, I have never had a problem with ordering anything from Kestrel. A little bird tells me that Gregg and Charlie have been very indulgent when my kids come calling for blades for the old man.

                      Lee Valley markets blades from a Vancouver smith: Crescent Knife Works.

                      #06D1034 is the Haida #4 carving blade. It's quite springy and needs fine sharpening.
                      #06D1045 is the Hogging blade. It looks like the 1034 but it is 3/16" not 1/8". Much stiffer.
                      Tune it up and it cuts as well as the 1034.

                      The Kestrel 'C' blade is big. It doesn't look out of place on a pole but the smaller blades would be more versatile in a dish, like old farrier's hoof knives.

                      I use a #68 and a #72 from Jamie Sharp. Tuned up, they are little flakes of steel for working into carving details with little effort.
                      Brian T

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                      • #12
                        DSCN8906.JPG
                        Last edited by Eric B; 03-02-2021, 03:16 PM. Reason: Roughed out holes filled with glue/sawdust mix then finish sand and paint black with white cheeks and eyes.

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                        • #13
                          DSCN8907.JPG
                          Last edited by Eric B; 03-02-2021, 03:18 PM. Reason: Burn finish for the brown body and will paint ends white.

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                          • #14
                            I see a wonderful feast dish in the making. Don't worry too much about defects in the wood. You weren't going for plastic perfection in the first place. Next, you can plan some relief carvings for the sides.
                            Brian T

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                            • #15
                              Taking shape nicely !!!!

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