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Fancy carved coffee table

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Guys
    Managed to cut my 1.500 X0.200X0.250 piece of kauri into 3 pieces to make the legs for the table. Had to do it with the hand saw as I had nothing in the way of power tools to deal to this big piece. Was pretty happy as I managed to get the cuts dead square.

    This is recycled timber taken from and old building that was pulled down The piece I have is just a small section of a huge beam that was taken out.

    There was a bit of rot in the end so I had to make 4 cuts in the end to get the 3 pieces I wanted.

    I have roughed out the tree part of the piece leaving some flat so I can clamp it to the bench. I was careful in the removal of wood so I could save a few blocks that will be good for small carvings at some stage.

    Am thinking I might do a small carving in the offcut first to get a "feel" for how the wood behaves having never carved it before. I have found that it splits easily along the grain which is very straight.

    I am finding it difficult to get my head around the laying out of the pattern to carve to. The problem is I can't get profiles at right angles to each other to work to.

    I welcome any advice on how to best approch caving the bear climbing the tree. This is a first so lots of thought going on here at the moment. If it all goes bad I can turn the legs on the lathe to look good and apply some contrasting dark timber for effect but that is plan B.

    Advice would be GOOD !!!!!!



    Attached Files

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    [QUOTE=DiLeon;n1209887]

    Ancient Kauri from New Zealand is the oldest workable wood in the world. Tsunamis leveled the mighty Kauri thousands of years ago and they have been preserved underground in the top half of the North Island of New Zealand for more than 45,000 years. What an honor to get your hands on such precious woods and put animals on it. I bet it feels wonderful to do this kind of work.

    Hi Dileon,
    Yes when I was standing there with a piece of wood that could be 60,000 years old I certainly felt I had a responsibility to Use the wood to best advantage as it is very special and unique. Also felt it should be treated with a degree of respect. When the last piece is dug from what little is left of our wetland swamps there will be no more.

    The kauri lifespan is estimated at between 1,500-4,000 years. The oldest living one we have today is estimated at being between 1,250 - 2,500 years old.



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  • DiLeon
    replied
    Originally posted by Glenn Jennings View Post
    Hi Larry,

    The side with the giraffe is rather long and the eye tended to want to look at the whole side rather than the individual animals. By making a centre piece different from the rest the eye tends to focus on that first then rove over the other two sides of the piece. I noticed this when I had all the patterns layed down on the wood prior to carving it. I thought it would bring more attention to the other individual animals on the long side. From your comment it looks to have worked hehehehehe. Thanks for your nice comments.
    It is great you understand this concept of what you see first, what you see second, and what you see third....your carving is really outstanding. I love the eco concept of the whole work!!!. Yes, we are massive losing the animals of our world in the last decade. It so fitting they are on such an aged piece of wood. Ancient Kauri from New Zealand is the oldest workable wood in the world. Tsunamis leveled the mighty Kauri thousands of years ago and they have been preserved underground in the top half of the North Island of New Zealand for more than 45,000 years. What an honor to get your hands on such precious woods and put animals on it. I bet it feels wonderful to do this kind of work.

    You know what Glenn you could take your wood chips and put them in a bottle and sell them to the tourist as the world's oldest wood.....LOL
    Last edited by DiLeon; 12-08-2021, 08:10 PM.

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Larry,
    Thanks buddy. Always had a "thing " for animals in general. Am really glad I managed to get them looking ok. It was important to me to do these beautiful creatures justice. The way the world is going we may not have some of them for much longer which will be a tragedy.

    Hi Dileon,
    The side with the giraffe is rather long and the eye tended to want to look at the whole side rather than the individual animals. By making a centre piece different from the rest the eye tends to focus on that first then rove over the other two sides of the piece. I noticed this when I had all the patterns layed down on the wood prior to carving it. I thought it would bring more attention to the other individual animals on the long side. From your comment it looks to have worked hehehehehe. Thanks for your nice comments.

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  • DiLeon
    replied
    The color in your wood is outstanding, the table looks beautiful with the carvings...just, one question why did you just burn the giraffe and carve the other animals? It is not bad but it does attract attention that he is different from the rest?

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  • tioga paddler
    replied
    Nice job Glenn. I really like your choice of animals to carve on the sides. Excellent job on the carving also.

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Merle
    Thanks mate. It has been a little bit of a battle of wills at time but not too bad in the end I think.

    Hi Tim
    hehe I didn't have the courage to go carving into the swamp kauri either so I got around that problem by making the sides out of flowering cherry and glueing them onto the kauri. Plus it adds just a little bit of contrast to the piece. Would like to see some photos of your fancy cherry piece. Just love nice grain patterns.

    Hi Sappy,
    Hehehe thanks for the nice comment mate. Funny you should mention the daisy bowl it occured to me also. hehehe.

    Hi Claude
    Thanks for the nice comment mate.
    Last edited by Glenn Jennings; 12-07-2021, 08:29 PM.

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  • Claude
    replied
    Beautiful work on that table top, Glenn! [that includes the sides, also!!!]

    Claude

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  • sappy
    replied
    Okay, I've got to find my socks, those pictures blew them off! Absolutely beautiful! Some how, I can visualize your "daisy"' bowl sitting in the middle of it.

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  • PittsburghTim
    replied
    Glen, the finished tabletop is excellent. Your carving details are superb.

    Like you, I have a few slabs of walnut and cherry that I just couldn't pass up because of the figure. I keep them until the inspiration to build something hits. I just finished a desk for my daughter in college. The top and hutch are both made from 2 inch thick cherry with a rather rare curly figure. Like your Kauri, the finished top almost looks like it changes as you move, almost as if you could reach down into it.

    Unlike you, I don't have the courage to add any carvings to it as my work could not compete with God's beautiful creation. I give you a lot of credit for taking up the challenge.

    Tim

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  • Merle Rice
    replied
    Hi Mate, You got to get an EXCELLENT all round , now don't Screw it doing the Legs. Ha,Ha. This Detailing can only be compared to your Guitar making . To improve on your next one you will definitely have your Work cut out for you. Enjoyed watching your work on this Piece. Merle

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Guys
    Well I have had trials and tribulations in getting the sides fitted to the top and getting a decent finish on it. The top had warped about a mm in the last couple of months so I had to sand it flat again which took a whole day. Having got it flat again It should be more stable with the sides all glued on.

    Then applied the sealer and sanded it back again then repeated the sealer and sanding. Took it down to 1000grit. Put the top coat on and wind blew dust all over it so another day of sanding to get it back to good again.

    Had another go and wasn't happy with the finish so back to sanding again and rather than spraying the tru oil I wiped it on this time for two coates. You could see some fine lines in the finish so I got some godards silver polish which is a very fine abrasive and spent a cou[ple of hours buffing it with that. Came up sort of ok. It wasn't the glass like finish I was looking for but it will do. Finished it with wax polish.

    Trying to get photos of it was a nightmare as the glare from the top was just killing the shot. Waited for an overcast day with reasonable light and tried again. Not Too bad but doesn't show the sides to best advantage,

    I took the photos from a lot of different angles so that you can see the kaleidoscope effect of colour change in the top as one moves around the piece.

    Comments and criticism are most welcome.

    I have another piece of swamp Kauri that I just could not resist buying so if I can make a better job of the next one that would be good. Always looking to approve.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Glenn Jennings; 12-06-2021, 08:07 PM.

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Guys,
    Well the last panel of the 4 is now cmpleted and has had 1 coat of sealer put on it.

    Comments and criticism welcome as usual.
    Attached Files

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Dirk
    Thanks for the nice comment mate.

    Hi Chuck
    You are dead right about the stepping outside the comfort zone being good for the development of skills. Am putting the finishing touches to the last of the 4 panels over the next couple of days or so. Then I will stabilise some minor cracks in the top and put the top together.

    I will put up progress posts on the legs as well so guys can comment on the method. Always looking for better ways to do things.

    Has been fun so far but will be glad to see the panels finished. These will have taken around 200 hours to do. A lot of it done under the 20 power microscope. Will be glad to get onto larger pieces I can take a decent whack at with a big gouge and mallet. The fine stuff is pretty hard on the old eyes. hehehe.

    I must be a masochist as I found another piece of swamp kauri with lovely grain patterns so might make another table that will fit under this one. Will see how it goes.

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  • bygeorge
    replied
    Hey Glenn I'm a little late to the party here and looked through all your posts here. Quite the challenge you put yourself up against! But then, when we challenge ourselves and step out of our comfort zones, that is when we grow and develop new skills. The panels are a clever way of presenting all of the various carvings and seem to be working out pretty well for you. I will be looking forward to seeing how it all comes together. The legs should prove to be very interesting too.

    Chuck

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