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Face practice project 6”

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  • #46
    Hi Joe, Ed.
    my wife put a small dent in my pristine as new winchester antlered game rife. (unfired) It stayed there for a year until I plucked up enough courage to remove. it.

    I removed the varnish and sealer from the area down to bare wood and soaked water into it for about 3 hours to get good penetration. In that time. NOTHING HAPPENED hydrating the wood fibre didn't change the ding at all.

    Based on that I think crushing the wood fibre to create a line or dent is a pemanent thing unless some form of pressure from within is exerted to push the fibre back out to form.

    To fix the dent I flooded it with water then laid a thick piece of soaked cloth over it , Cranked the iron up to max temperature and waited until it was super hot then plastered it hard down over the ding area. The steam pressure created blew the fibre back out to fill the ding. It took several goes to get it all out.

    I let it dry for a couple of days then loaded the area with 50% thinned true oil so all the fine voids in the fibre were filled. Did this a second time then finished with tru oil. You can't see where the ding was at all.

    So yes I think the lines will stay without deterioration.

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    • #47
      Thanks for the insight Glenn, Always great to hear the experience of others
      . . .JoeB

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      • #48
        DiLeon : many thanks for the site https://www.sightsize.com/buy-a-nose/

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Glenn Jennings View Post
          Hi Joe, Ed.
          my wife put a small dent in my pristine as new winchester antlered game rife. (unfired) It stayed there for a year until I plucked up enough courage to remove. it.

          I removed the varnish and sealer from the area down to bare wood and soaked water into it for about 3 hours to get good penetration. In that time. NOTHING HAPPENED hydrating the wood fibre didn't change the ding at all.

          Based on that I think crushing the wood fibre to create a line or dent is a pemanent thing unless some form of pressure from within is exerted to push the fibre back out to form.

          To fix the dent I flooded it with water then laid a thick piece of soaked cloth over it , Cranked the iron up to max temperature and waited until it was super hot then plastered it hard down over the ding area. The steam pressure created blew the fibre back out to fill the ding. It took several goes to get it all out.

          I let it dry for a couple of days then loaded the area with 50% thinned true oil so all the fine voids in the fibre were filled. Did this a second time then finished with tru oil. You can't see where the ding was at all.

          So yes I think the lines will stay without deterioration.
          Glenn, Dad was an old wood worker back in the 40's -early 60's. And any wood that had those nasty dents in a shop was treated basically the same. HE, stole Moms iron and used wash clothes, dampened them and laid them on the affected area, then with the iron just started moving around in a circle on steam heat .
          Usually that worked real well. Recently our oldest son reconditioned some old shotguns did the same thing.

          But it sounds like yours must have been quite the damage.. WHEW!!
          Cheers
          Chuck and thanks for your sharing that one too.
          Chuck
          Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

          https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

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          • #50
            Japanese label that wood-raising technique "ukibori." Might not have spelled it correctly.
            Apparently possible to create raised and textured skin (toads) and fish scales.
            Brian T

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            • #51
              Had to look up what Brian was say


              "The technique for wood goes like this: using a hard punch with a very smooth rounded end, the wood is depressed a small amount beneath the surface. This often requires a firm tap with a mallet. The surface is then carved down level with the bottom of the depression formed by the punch (I like to place a pencil dot in the bottoms of several depressions to keep track of the depth), and the area where the depressions were is wetted with boiling water (use a small brush). Wetting the surface should be done soon after punching. The longer you wait, the less chance you have of succeeding."
              . . .JoeB

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              • #52
                This is Ian Norbury video on the technique ...he has it in one of his books also.
                Last edited by DiLeon; 01-26-2022, 08:40 PM.
                . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                • #53
                  I stand accused of losing my marbles. So be it. I can still recall all sorts of niche carving tricks.
                  Brian T

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                    I stand accused of losing my marbles. So be it. I can still recall all sorts of niche carving tricks.
                    Lately what opinion is time tested... in more often than not... the person who is doing the accusing is just backward or uneducated in the subject matter.....lots of judges and juries out there speaking loud these days and most belong in the funny farm with tape on their mouths.
                    . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                    • #55
                      Never thought to use the method to creatre an effect. Think it would be easier to just carve it.

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                      • #56
                        I've seem articles about getting the warts on a toad this way - think it was some netsuke from Japan. Press in the wood, then sand down to the bottom of the depressions. Wet/steam and the warts pop up into prominence. Would be difficult, I think, to carve such a surface...

                        Claude
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                        • #57
                          One down three to go.

                          4A4A009A-F61F-472B-BC82-2228614F3B35.jpgAdd water 09294F53-5637-41D2-817E-A4B9BD25B6A5.jpg
                          Last edited by Nebraska; 01-29-2022, 03:50 PM.

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                          • #58
                            Nice work Ed!!! That is a very good likeness!!! Are you going to detail the hair a bit??.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Glenn Jennings View Post
                              Nice work Ed!!! That is a very good likeness!!! Are you going to detail the hair a bit??.
                              Thanks Glenn I think it is too, pretty happy with how it turned out.

                              Re Hair: No hair, since these are just practice pieces to work on doing better faces I’m not going to spend time on the hair. I have a grand nephew/guitar player who is really into 60’s and 70’s rock thinking he will probably end up with these if he wants them.
                              Last edited by Nebraska; 01-29-2022, 04:07 PM.

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                              • #60
                                Boah, you got the right expression.

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