Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WIP "Okina Noh mask"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • WIP "Okina Noh mask"

    Attempting a difficult Noh mask, what makes these mask challenging is the precise angles needed to achieve facial expressions, this one will also have (kiriago) meaning a separate lower jaw. I will post images of my progress if people are interested.
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
    This gallery has 6 photos.

  • #2
    Really nice carving table and set up. Look forward to seeing your project develop.
    We live in the land of the free because of the brave! Semper Fi
    https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

    Comment


    • #3
      Agree with Randy, your set-up looks outstanding and very efficient.
      Did you build the table yourself?

      Comment


      • #4
        Look forward to the progress.
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.texaswoodartist.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Very ambitious project. One question! What's the background story on your interest in Noh Masks. Most Americans haven't even heard the term Noh.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes very interested in your work please post information and photos as you work. For those who do not know what Noh is.

            These wooden masks, used in an ancient form of Japanese theater called Noh, were made to be expressionless. But performers are charged with using slight and subtle movements to reveal the hidden emotions carved into each one.
            Dating back almost 1,000 years, Noh is a style of musical drama with plots ranging from Japanese legends to modern-day events. Its masks, carved from blocks of cypress, are a key part of the tradition, representing figures like demons and monks. Actors are able to portray their characters' feelings by changing the angle and orientation of their heads.
            . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JBright11 View Post
              Agree with Randy, your set-up looks outstanding and very efficient.
              Did you build the table yourself?
              Yes, the table I upcycled from and old oak kitchen table reinforced with 2x4s along with 4x4 cedar legs and 2x6 leg supports. This was my first time making mortise and tenon joints and first work bench, its all glued up no hardware to hold it together. Its been a sold first woodworking table.

              As for the carving vise. I was fed up with making jigs and using the pipe vise, so I used some scrap oak for the arm and maple mostly for the upright 1x6 I believe with one scrap of walnut maple thrown in. Three boards per side all glued up with scrap 1x6 in center. I used E-Z knife thread inserts on the bottom of the vertical piece for the threaded rod that was used to mount it too the table. I did have to add some weight to the table to keep it from rocking thus the addition of the Wilson vise at the bottom carriage bolt and clamp nut for the vertical movement of the arm, at that time I could only find a obscure metric clamp nut, it was around 3/8in it works good but the thread was not designed for repeated use and has become more difficult to loosen at times.

              This is my second carving table and vice I made from Ash. I made this one for my office. I found some better vice hardware. Moxon vise kit from taylor tools, 3/4 rod is very sturdy and was considerably cheaper vs benchcraft hardware. Once again no hardware to table, all mortise and tenon joints. I almost doubled my vertical arm placement by slightly recessing it into the table, once again used E-Z knife thread inserts 4 this time to mount the vertical guide to the table. The un-stained ash against the wall it anchored to the wall studs, this prevents all table movement. One thing to note with the Moxon kit, i used thread locker on the nut and inlayed the nut flush. Used glue and screws to assemble the arm.
              You do not have permission to view this gallery.
              This gallery has 8 photos.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Eddy-Smiles View Post
                Very ambitious project. One question! What's the background story on your interest in Noh Masks. Most Americans haven't even heard the term Noh.
                Honestly I'm not sure. Maybe it was timing? A few years ago I got my first tattoo "Japanese sleeve" this was not done on a whim, extensive research and understanding lead me into the Japanese Edo period and the fantastic art that was created during that time. At this same time I was just starting to wood carve. My first real major goal was to carve a Hannya mask for my tattooist as a gift.

                Once i started using full sized gouges I carved one, the amount of research and preparation was ridiculous. I only had pictures to go by and once it was completed I knew I could do BETTER! The research sucked me in and I guess I drank too much of the Kool-Aid because I'm seriously considering carving all 60 basic types. But truly want to master a handful with hopes to possibly teach it in the future.

                I have a deep respect and appreciation for anything considered "Timeless" and for me noh masks are just that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This will be really interesting to follow!! look forward to seeing the progress ay you work throught the piece.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Scott.L View Post

                    Honestly I'm not sure. Maybe it was timing? A few years ago I got my first tattoo "Japanese sleeve" this was not done on a whim, extensive research and understanding lead me into the Japanese Edo period and the fantastic art that was created during that time. At this same time I was just starting to wood carve. My first real major goal was to carve a Hannya mask for my tattooist as a gift.

                    Once i started using full sized gouges I carved one, the amount of research and preparation was ridiculous. I only had pictures to go by and once it was completed I knew I could do BETTER! The research sucked me in and I guess I drank too much of the Kool-Aid because I'm seriously considering carving all 60 basic types. But truly want to master a handful with hopes to possibly teach it in the future.

                    I have a deep respect and appreciation for anything considered "Timeless" and for me noh masks are just that.
                    Scott.... Very interesting. I thought perhaps it was because you had spent time in Asia. For many of us, civilian and military alike, it only takes a short visit to the Far East contract the Asian "flu!" During my 8-1/2 years I spent a good 4 of those years in Asian waters and spent 3 of those homeported out of Sasebo, Japan. I have since had a life long fascination with all things Japanese ; philosophy, religion, food, history, just a total emersion in the culture including over 30-years in the Japanese martial arts. Your talent and ability is remarkable and I look forward to seeing how your collection comes to fruition. Personally, I have neither the means to carve something as complex as you nor the artistic talent and simply settle for the whittling of small simple Jizo's when the mood and need to connect strikes. Keep up the great work!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have also a history of Japan been there eight times and would stay months at a time on the farms rice fields before Nippon got really modern. Also, like Eddie. I have martial art black belt in Genwakai. Even dabbled briefly in the study of the Ninja. My appreciation of the Asian arts is massive as I have lots of art I have collected from various Asian countries. Most of the food I eat is Japanese and Thai. The first time I went to Japan...we went to a place where no one had seen a white-blond, blue eye woman before....believe me that at night the drunk people were banging on the door to see what I look like and if the rumors were true. I felt like a monkey in the zoo, everyone wanted to touch my hair. LOL the history of Japan is rich and old. The mask and the art is also. I am sure you will do it much justice. Will look forward to the progression of your work.
                      . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I do have a history of spending time abroad, was stationed in Hawaii for a few years. I really miss the spicy tuna Don from KuruKuru. My mouth is watering just thinking about it. Retired after 26 years. Navy Dive Independent Duty Corpsman.

                        You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                        This gallery has 5 photos.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Shaping up nicely Scott.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            pretty much done with the top for now, time to clean out the back and fine tune the details.
                            You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                            This gallery has 1 photos.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Beautiful piece!
                              My Website: www.carvingjunkies.com
                              Instagram
                              : https://www.instagram.com/carvingjunkies/
                              Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carvingjunkies/

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X