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A barque under sail.

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  • A barque under sail.

    While my studio is being rebuilt, I have had to be content with carving on my lap or at the dining room table. I recieved an order of Basswood plaques that I had Heineke Wood Products make up for me, and I am deep into my first one here. This plaque is Basswood, 1 1/2" x 10" x 15", a nice size I figure for these sea scenes that I enjoy doing. I also had them do up some in 12" x 18" the same thickness and more in 7/8" thickness. I must say, what wonderful wood this is to carve, just sweet and not a flaw in it. Great folks to deal with there too.

    Have to do some burning now, to bring out the details.

    A barque, for those who don't know, is a three masted sailing ship, that has square sails on the fore and main mast and schooner rigged, gaff and boom sails on the mizzen or rear mast. They were very popular on the East Coast of Canada and the US late in the Nineteenth Century, as they did not require quite as many men to man them as a full rigged ship would. A full rigged ship has square sails on all three masts. A square sail requires men to climb the mast to handle the sail when setting or taking in sail, while a schooner boom and gaff sail can be handled from the deck. Though not quite as fast as a full rigged ship, they could carry just as much cargo so would take just a little longer delivering it.

    Bob

    Bob
    Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

  • #2
    Re: A barque under sail.

    Hi Bob,

    I guess it goes to show you can't keep a good man down. Even without your studio you're doing awesome work. The barque is beautiful and the sea is exquisitely carved.
    Ron T.
    http://stickcarving.webs.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: A barque under sail.

      Beautiful carving Bob, the water is just full of movement.

      Corey

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: A barque under sail.

        Incredible!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: A barque under sail.

          Hi Bob,

          this is looking great! another gem of a piece from the master. Keep us posted, please!

          Mark

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: A barque under sail.

            Finished it today, burned and sealed. I love the effect of the sea with this one. Brings it alive.

            The vessel is a Miramichi built barque, Competent, 1836, by William Mason master shipwright, in the J. Russell Shipyard, Chatham. She is seen here on her way to England, loaded with timber, where she was sold as was her cargo.

            Bob
            Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: A barque under sail.

              Give me a tall ship and a star to guide her by. VERY NICE!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: A barque under sail.

                Great job! I also appreciate the history of the vessel.
                KeithC

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: A barque under sail.

                  I'm with Keith here. I also enjoy the carving and the history. More More

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: A barque under sail.

                    fantastic job on this one, Bob! Well done!!!

                    Mark

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: A barque under sail.

                      Thats really beautiful.
                      The waves look alive... is that a seagull I hear?

                      Very well done, indeed!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Competent sailed for Bombay from Liverpool on December 29 1939 under Captain Robinson. A1 at Lloyds, 537 tons, newly coppered.

                        The following letter was received by my great great great grandfather, Dr William Sorby, surgeon, Manchester from their son Thomas:

                        Bombay. 17 May 1840
                        ¬
                        My very dear parents,

                        Before you read this letter may God Almighty spare you the Grief and
                        sorrow in reading it have in writing; it is the earnest prayers of
                        your undutiful son Tom Sorby.

                        As it was my own device in going to sea I shall say as little about it
                        as I possibly can, but I can assure you it will be as good a thing as
                        could possibly have happened.

                        But before I go any farther in my letter I must ask my Father's
                        forgiveness for the manner in which I left him when I was at Liverpool
                        which I assure him I shall never forgive myself for leaving 'him in
                        the manner that I did.

                        We had very severe weather in the Channel but after we left the
                        Channel we had most beautiful weather until we got within a few
                        hundred miles of Bombay I am happy to say everything went on well with
                        me, I enjoyed most excellent health and have very much grown and what
                        was better than all the Captain said he had not the least doubt but I
                        should be an ornament to my profession. I was very much liked and
                        respected by the mates who were very nice young men, but it, seems
                        misfortunes never halt, the Captain was taken very ill and was
                        confined to his cabin. and never came out until we got within sight of
                        land when he came on deck on the night of the 6 May and ordered that
                        we should lay to all night until we could get a pilot in the morning
                        which we did with a merry heart but what a shock did we receive in the
                        morning, the Captain came on deck again about 6 o-clock and ordered
                        all sail to be made which we had scarcely done when the once fine
                        majestic "Competent" struck against a rock and knocked her bottom out,
                        the Captain fell down against one of the poop sails and said 'All was
                        up' the mate ordered the boats to be lowered in readiness, which being
                        leaky they were all swamped alongside as soon as the were lowered down
                        and we were expecting every minute to go down but the pilot coming
                        along side we were a little more at ease and after working strenuously
                        and trying to sail up to our decks in water for 5 or 6 hours we were
                        at last ordered ashore and sent to the Sailors Home which is something
                        like a poor house where we were kept by Government until such times as
                        we got ships to come in.

                        I directly wrote that letter to Mr Fawcett but not being able to see
                        him he living two or three hundred miles in the country I saw Mr
                        Pennington who was very kind to me and promised me with money and
                        would not allow me to stay at the Sailors' Home but sent me on board
                        the "Ariol" one of the East India Company's ships were we lived in the
                        most fashionable manner: the Captain wished me to go with him as 2
                        mate to China but she going there to smuggle opium and likely to have
                        an affray with the natives and I not knowing anything about firearms I
                        declined the offer although I think if I had gone I should have made
                        many friends which would have been as good as a fortune in this part
                        but as Mr Biggs as began with me he shall end with me; the Captain
                        finding that I would not go then said he would give me some letters to
                        his friends in London, which I shall bring with me although they will
                        be of no use.

                        Please to remember me most kindly to Mr.& Mrs Biggs Mr and Mrs Baird
                        and all my friends. To all my dear Sisters and Brothers hoping they
                        are all happy tell them they need not¬ be afraid of me for I shall
                        out good lad.

                        And now may God Almighty bless you is the prayer of your undutiful Son

                        Tom Sorby

                        Tom was never heard of again, although I have found records of a Captain Robinson in India in the 1860s.

                        Any help in finding out his fate would be much appreciated!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=squbrigg;n21132] SNIP.

                          A barque, for those who don't know, is a three masted sailing ship, that has square sails on the fore and main mast and schooner rigged, gaff and boom sails on the mizzen or rear mast. They were very popular on the East Coast of Canada and the US late in the Nineteenth Century, as they did not require quite as many men to man them as a full rigged ship would. A full rigged ship has square sails on all three masts SNIP

                          Bob


                          Bob, do I understand correctly that the masts would be in the same location whether it was barque rigged or full rigged?
                          Arthur

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wow, that is quite a letter Bowerick, and so nice to be able to tie it in with the vessel in my carving. Thank you for sharing that with us. I would imagine there were a lot of similar letters like that one back then. Sons running away to sea after an argument with a father.

                            Arthur, you do understand correctly. The mast, in this case the mizzen, would still be in the same position, wither rigged as a ship or a barque. It was usually rigged as a barque to reduce the number of crew needed to work the ship, if the ship wasn't required to be shipping for speed, as the barque rig would reduce the speed slightly.

                            Bob
                            Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There must be something wrong with my computer, I have no pictures of this project at all....very disappointed
                              . . .JoeB

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