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  • knot so bad!





    My first Celtic Knot! Power carved using my amazing Micro motor! I am quite addicted to it's, and my new capabilities!

    This is Apple Wood. Super hard and very nice to work with!

  • #2
    Re: knot so bad!

    That is beautiful!

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    • #3
      Re: knot so bad!

      I agree with Lynn, beautiful in deed. Ginny

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      • #4
        Re: knot so bad!

        Very nice. Whats that in the middle?

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        • #5
          Re: knot so bad!

          Well done Keoma. The tines remind me of the ones on the combs my students used when I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Malawi, Africa. Time tested design it seems.

          I was never exactly sure why they used these combs as they much as they did. They had them with them all of the time. I was puzzled because the photo taken in 1964 shows that they all wore their hair very short.

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          • #6
            Re: knot so bad!

            Very beautiful combo!
            Steve

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            • #7
              Re: knot so bad!

              THOR! SO good to see you!!! <3 Thank you so much!
              Paul- I have done lots of research on combs from around the world, with a lot of time spent on African Combs-Turns out that they were considered stylish at one time if they were just stuck in the hair...like on the side- in the very short hair. Kinda like a few decades ago when it was familiar to see the afro comb sticking out. The traditional African comb is the grandfather of That particular style Is that comb in the picture yours? What a treasure! And to have spent time there with the people, THAT is a treasure for certain! Thank you for sharing!

              Peter- In the center is a handmade Lampwork bead (Cabochon) by my amazing and talented friend Claire Morris. She has a company called Rowanberry Glass Art out of England and I can tell you that her work makes me just drool!
              Ginny and Lynn- thank you both so much!

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              • #8
                Re: knot so bad!

                Paul- I found this picture surfing just now, it is from the early 20th century. Super stylin' eh?

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                • #9
                  Re: knot so bad!

                  Keoma, you have enlightened me about the comb. I had not considered them to be decorative. It is one of the treasures I brought home from my time in Malawi. A treasure because of the way I came to receive it.

                  African society, a half century ago, was conservative with roles being well defined. Teachers were the door to life beyond subsistence living the door to hope, for Africans. We had 35,000, qualified students applying for the 3,000 secondary school places. Teachers were considered to be at almost the top of the social order. They could not be allowed to carry anything when being accompanied by students. On the other hand, teachers were expected to maintain the dignity accorded their position.

                  For example, one of my projects between semesters was to assist a missionary in building a new classroom. I could assist with instruction to the point of laying bricks a few bricks; but I was not permitted to go beyond that and help with actually laying the bricks. Photos are of our making the bricks and starting the building.

                  A teacher visiting a remote village was considered an honor and had better be prepared to leave with gifts the villagers could not really afford. I once headed back to the school with all my pockets bulging with fresh eggs. To receive a gift from one of the 150 students would have required accepting a deluge of gifts. I had admired the combs used by my students was smart enough not to say I would like one.

                  I was at the African market buying a handful of roasted groundnuts (peanuts) when I noticed the seller had one of these combs in her hair. I tried asking if they were for sale anywhere in the market. Her English was not up to the task. I tried to explaining in Chinyanga, "Mpunzitzi pa Malosa (I am a teacher from Malosa)". The lady became extremely excited and tried handing the comb to me. Luckily, for me; before any major social faux pas (such as my refusing the gift) occurred, a young girl, an elementary student, stepped in as translator. The "groundnut vendor" had a child at Malosa and wanted me to accept her comb as a gift of appreciation.

                  You are so incredibly correct Keoma, " And to have spent time there with the people, THAT is a treasure for certain!". These years, for me, were transitional. I use this allegory for explanation, "Mother Africa said to America, 'The Paul Guraedy you sent me no longer exists. I am sending home the new Paul Guraedy.' " I have been asked if I would like to go back and my answer is, "Absolutely not! That time was my Camelot. The bad has long since gone and the good has morphed into something beyond reality! I have no intention of bursting that dream."

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                  • #10
                    Re: knot so bad!

                    Oh wow, Paul! Thank you so much for sharing with me! I was so moved with the visual you gave me! How beautiful! There is no one quite like a grateful mother! I am sure she was honored to give it to you regardless of tradition.

                    I am so impressed with what you did there-and glad you have those memories to hold onto.

                    It would make a great story though-or movie!

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