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Mystery project vessel.

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  • Mystery project vessel.

    A lot of work in a short period of time, a "quick and dirty" model, to say the least. Tons of shortcuts, but I will reveal the reason in good time. (If you are interested?)

    It's coming along, should be finished by the end of the week, I hope. I had planned to be finished by today, but we had contractors in putting in new flooring, and I don't handle confusion and noise well, so not much done for three days.

    Bob
    Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

  • #2
    Re: Mystery project vessel.

    Awesome BoB ,

    and yep i want to know , it looks fimliar but can't place it.


    Also I want a close up of the dragon .... PLease =)

    Garry

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Mystery project vessel.

      Hey Bob, it looks kinda like that "gold Vessel" they salvaged a few years ago...The "AMERICA" or something like that....Lookin great though. Tom H
      http://beginnerscarvingcorner.blogspot.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Mystery project vessel.

        Bob,
        Beautiful, as always! I'm more curious about where this vessel is going than what it's named. Any hints?
        Wade

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        • #5
          Re: Mystery project vessel.

          I should be so good as to do such a job, much less a 'quick and dirty'

          Not sure about the "Monitor-Merrimac" theory... I am curious... can't wait for the reveal!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Mystery project vessel.

            You do fantastic work Bob! Want to see it when its finished!Talking
            "Lif iz lik a box "o" choc lets, ya nevr kno whut yull git!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Mystery project vessel.

              Sure is turning out pretty!!! Really taking shape now, and showing her lines. I'm quite happy with it, for a quick and dirty one!

              Bob

              PS: I attached a close up of that dragon for you Garry, sorry, I though I had posted it before.
              Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Mystery project vessel.

                A few more of detail.

                Please, don't mind the shortcuts folks, is a quick one.


                Bob
                Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Mystery project vessel.

                  Getting down to the small bits and pieces. The brass work looks good, set off by the dark hull well. Rolled the sails and soaked them with white glue and water to set them, held up waiting for them to dry. Tomorrow I carve the sea, I hope!

                  Bob
                  Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Mystery project vessel.

                    When you get it done Bob you might try and discribe it to me. It sounds like a great ship though.
                    Ron

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                    • #11
                      Re: Mystery project vessel.

                      That's a beautiful ship Bob! The detail is amazing. Wow , what patience you have ! Thanks for showing it to us.. Charlotte

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                      • #12
                        Re: Mystery project vessel.

                        Ron ..... good idea, let me give it a try.

                        The vessel is one of the early steamers, still has the masts of a sailing ship, three in this case, barque rigged, but has two big paddle wheels amidships on either side. The vessel is the Royal Mail Steamer Britannia, the first vessel to begin regular mail service between Great Britain and North America. She was 207 feet long, had a breadth of 34 feet, and graced a beautiful clipper bow and much bright work (carvings painted or gilded).

                        The model is based on the book cover, that has a portrait of the Britannia, copy of an original painted in 1841. It is a waterline model, scale of 1/8" = 1 " approximately. The hull is carved in Pine, the deck is planked in Basswood, stained in Teak, the bulwarks are built up of Pine, and I have tried to match the hull colour.....kind of a brown/black, with pale yellow trim. The bow has scroll work (also in pale yellow) on the cheeks, and head rails. The bowsprite and jibboom are varnished. On the forescasle is an anchor lashed to the rail and some brass bollards for securing the ship alongside in port.

                        The fore deck has a capstain in brass for raising the anchor, and several hatches for stowage below decks. There are also cabins serving as cookhouse, sailmakers, carpenter, bosun stores, engineering office, and passanger service, all built in Pine with Mahogany roofs.

                        The paddlewheel boxes are framed in Pine and thin aircraft grade plywood facia has the went openings cut out on a jug saw and the scroll work painted on in pale yellow. The top of the paddlewheel boxes are used as a bridge, so each has brass rails, with copper wire threaded through the rails, to represent the stantions and three wire rails.

                        Aft are the lifeboats, mounted on brass stanchions and have blocks ready for lowering, the blocks are boxwood. The boats are apinted in Brown/black with white trim. On deck are the deck cabins, framed in Pine, with Mahogany roofs, that match the bulwark railing. At the stern are quartergallleries and windows for the lounge and in a row along the outside of the hull running fore and aft, abouth half way between the waterline and the top rail. are portholes for the cabin windows.

                        The masts and spars are built but not perminanately installed yet, and I was attaching the sails to the yards just before I came upstairs for the night.

                        Just have the sea left to do, I'll carve it in Pine and paint it, maybe using some epoxy putty for along the side, bow wave and paddle foam. Hope it works. Once the vessel is in the window display I get picture of it and describe the whole scene to you.

                        Bob
                        Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Mystery project vessel.

                          Thank you Bob for the great description. The way you told me about made me feel like I was on deck getting a tour. It sounds like a fantastic project and I hope you win. But either way it is a project to be proud of. Again Thank You for taking the time to tell me about it.
                          Ron

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Mystery project vessel.

                            Bob, sure am glad Ron asked for the description. Before you went into that detail it was a very well done and pretty carving. The description made me appreciate it much more than just seeing the pictures.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Mystery project vessel.

                              Attached the sails (rolled to the yard and painted with glue/water mix to retain their form, then glued and tied into place) and began carving the sea. Using a 1" X 11" Pine board about 48" long (the ship is 35" from the end of the bowsprite to the end of the spanker boom), I have to first carve out the hole to set the vessel into. To do this you position the ship on the board and trace around the hull onto the Pine with pencil and stop cut it, then gouge away. You could use a router or Forstner bit on a drill press, but I enjoy peeling off those shavings by hand.

                              After I rest up a bit, I'll start carving out a sea. Just like bird carving, I'll draw out the waves and swell and make it correct for the scene, though with no sails set I could get away with just about any kind of sea, but I'm a stickler for accuracy.

                              Bob
                              Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                              Comment

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