Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lathe tips

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Lathe tips

    Retired woodcraftsman giving me a medium size lathe with all parts and tools....I know zero about them. Right now major clean up of shop and making space. I am looking forward to learning an new craft of small bowl making and pens and canes......yes we are going to do the UK canes in the future....but this is another major learning curb...I am excieted about!!! . Will be reading books and watching You Tube videos but any pointers, things to watch out for, safety issues and any experience will be super appreciated!!! There are a few wood craftmans down sizing and they are giving away tools.... so I got all kinds of things coming in. God is great...smile.

  • #2
    There are a couple of woodturning clubs in Hawaii, the best way to shorten the learning curve is to join one of them. Woodturners like most woodworkers are more than willing to mentor a new person. "Check the American Woodturning Association for the contact info for the clubs. Welcome to the woodturning deep hole, you will never be the same if the "bug" bites you. A woodturner since 1962.

    Comment


    • #3
      Last time I was at a WoodCraft store, I noticed they had woodturning classes. One of the best things I could say is make sure you get some good instruction as far as how to chuck your wood, what speed to turn various woods, and making sure your tools are sharp. Also, no loose clothing close to the woodturning is another thing I recommend.

      Comment


      • #4
        At this stage of moving things to make space for the lathe, be sure it is anchored down well. A chunk of wood, even for a small bowl, can be off-center and cause the whole machine to jump around. Once it is secure you don't have to worry about it again.

        Comment


        • #5
          A1 on the classes at woodcraft. They used to offer free pen turning classes and would make pens for our service men and women. You can learn a lot in these classes.

          Comment


          • #6
            first, get some instruction.
            Second, get some instruction!
            Did I mention you should get some instruction?

            The lathe is one of my favorite tools, but is is DANGEROUS if you don't know what you are doing. there are so many things you can do wrong, and it is so simple to avoid them all if you get someone who knows what they are doing to show you the way.

            I picked up my first power tool at 8 years old, my dad taught e how to use them all- he got a lathe when I was 12 or so and would not let me touch it until I learned how to use it in shop class. I can tell you for sure he saved my butt from some serious pain.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Di, when you get to the point of Turning a Piece Wood , you must remove all your Rings and Watches. Merle

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dogcatcher View Post
                There are a couple of woodturning clubs in Hawaii, the best way to shorten the learning curve is to join one of them. Woodturners like most woodworkers are more than willing to mentor a new person. "Check the American Woodturning Association for the contact info for the clubs. Welcome to the woodturning deep hole, you will never be the same if the "bug" bites you. A woodturner since 1962.
                Actually the only condition of getting the lathe was that I had a master craftmans who turns bowls...... show me how to use the lathe ...take it apart and put it together....and how to use the tools correctly. . So instruction is coming, Bob turns bowls that can be four feet across. . I know in any kind of learning from someone....... it is still nice to get pointers from other people although.....in cases he forgets some things. Almost all my learning from power tools is self taught although....believe me .....I learn things the hard way. It is a wonder I am not dead...... So I am super happy about the whole thing, and looking forward to learning a new power tool.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tbox61 View Post
                  Last time I was at a WoodCraft store, I noticed they had woodturning classes. One of the best things I could say is make sure you get some good instruction as far as how to chuck your wood, what speed to turn various woods, and making sure your tools are sharp. Also, no loose clothing close to the woodturning is another thing I recommend.
                  Actually I got the best person in the whole islands, he is not an instructor although.....master craftsman who actually turns award winning bowls in the islands. He will be teaching me the basics and ect....but I learn a very long time ago. The more people who tell you what to do and what not to do from their learning experiences the better it is. I have gotten so many awesome tips over the years from people on here, and I continue to learn new things all the time...... So thanks so much for your tips. This is some of his work.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pallin View Post
                    At this stage of moving things to make space for the lathe, be sure it is anchored down well. A chunk of wood, even for a small bowl, can be off-center and cause the whole machine to jump around. Once it is secure you don't have to worry about it again.
                    Great thing to know thanks a bunch Phil......

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Merle Rice View Post
                      Hi Di, when you get to the point of Turning a Piece Wood , you must remove all your Rings and Watches. Merle
                      I do not wear, ....learn that using the die grinders and angle grinders....it is amazing what can get caught in your power tools....hair, clothes, jewelry of all kinds, even some gloves.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I don't know a turner named Bob in Hawaii, but the names Kelly Dunn and Emiliano Achaval do ring a bell with me. Both are production turners. The latter is or was the President of the
                        Maui Woodturners Association. The other club's name escapes me at the moment.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=dogcatcher;n1127476]I don't know a turner named Bob in Hawaii, but the names Kelly Dunn and Emiliano Achaval do ring a bell with me. Both are production turners. The latter is or was the President of the [LEFT]Maui Woodturners Association. The other club's name escapes me at the moment. [/LEFT

                          Here is a bio....Goes by Robert at times or RW Butts or Bob... ... belongs to Hawaii Craftman.
                          http://www.rwbutts.com/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Looks like you are in good hands. Best of luck on this new adventure.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Remember the lathe has to be level in both directions. And if it is not a heavy heavy one, the internal base or legs are often weighted down with sand bags. You don't want a lathe moving as you are. Catches can be demanding and sometimes stains the wood. Be careful and be watchful. Learn by Doing. I have turned since I was a teen. I have some turnings I've done through the years, cups, bird houses, gavels and the like. I've turned bowls and platters. My Uncle (now passed) turned Cowboy hats. Yes wide brim. We have them in 3-4 types of wood. He was in a club and the club members took a road trip from North Carolina to Indiana (maybe near by but seems to me) to buy and tote home a big lathe with options. It was a 3-phase power speed controlled machine. Mine is a 1947 cast iron that is on a metal frame with a 2" thick wood top. I bagged it. It was heavy but when turning large out of shape logs or blocks you need all you can get.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X