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Using a dremel flex shaft and keyless chuck

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  • Using a dremel flex shaft and keyless chuck

    Hello! I am not a woodcarver per say but I do carve on gourds, which is similar. I use a dremel 4000 with a flex shaft and keyless chuck. I’ve been using this to carve filigree, etc. on the gourd surface once the skin is removed to expose the underlying pulp. So, here is my problem: the carving bit has come out of the chuck several times today, while I am using it! I have never had this happen before! Yikes! After much fiddling around with the chuck, I cannot figure out what the problem is. Any thoughts/advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

  • #2
    Tell us all a little more about yourself and your carving.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      It may be that the chuck is dirty. My try blowing it out with compressed air ir cleaning it some how. If the bit comes out, then something is not tight enough or is loosening during use. If it has some type of collet inside the chuck, then that might need to be replaced or a smaller one used.
      'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

      http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
      http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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      • #4
        Hello mpounders and Brain T! Thank you for your input! As for more about myself: I am a 76 year old woman. I have used various types of power tools over the years and I am just starting to get into power carving on gourds. Of course, on gourds one carves only 2 dimensional or relief carvings. I aspire to carving more detailed work such as wildlife including birds, fish, reptiles and mammals. Right now I am just carving textures such as filigree, stippling, etc. which brings me to the current situation!

        I am a little nervous about taking the chuck apart to change the collet or for a more thorough cleaning. Thus, I have decided to just buy a new one! That basically eliminates the possibility of flinging another burr across the garage! Hopefully!

        I am am very glad I found this forum and hope that I can ask more questions here about burrs, power carving in general and other insights from your members. Again, thank you for responding to my question!

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        • #5
          I'm curious = I'd like to see more examples of your "power carving."

          I've had drill bits slip for no apparent reason. Then the next one cranks up tight for as long as I need it.
          The only thing that seemed to help was some 400 or 600 grit sandpaper to take the shine off the shank of the drill bit.
          That slight roughness cured them all.
          Brian T

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          • #6
            If your Dremel has a collet-type chuck, then Brian's advice is spot on. It it is the "similar to a Jacob's chuck" type that can accept different shaft sizes, then I suspect a) it's not tight enough, and b) shaft is too shiny (Brian's advice.

            Let us know if roughing up the burr shafts helps...

            Claude
            Last edited by Claude; 07-13-2019, 04:28 PM.
            My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

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            • #7
              I bought a new Dremel 4300 and that Chuck was in it . I thought it was a Good Idea but was wrong . The Bit would come loose and the only way I could keep it tight was to use Pliers to tighten it , then it held . Good Idea bad Design. Junk . I went back to Collet type Chuck . Merle

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              • #8
                Hi Brian! You asked to see some examples of my work, so here goes:
                this gourd is an example of the textures I do. The stones and ammonite are inlaid. The
                colors are ink stains. Some patterns are wood-burned.
                The unfinished gourd is the one I am currently working on.
                So, there you have it. Pretty simple but keeps me busy!
                Last edited by Gourdart; 07-13-2019, 11:27 AM.

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                • #9
                  Ho Gourdart , You have a Very Steady Hand and do Beautiful work . Doesn't look Simple to me . Thanks for showing your Work . Merle

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                  • #10
                    My experience with any rotary tool....they do not last....I have about ten of them sitting on my bench about four of them will not hold a bit or burr. They get major used....one of the main issue is the chuck or collet is going bad and needs to be replaced with a new one. I order mine replacement parts on Amazon. Until they wear out I tighten my with pliers.... when they no longer work....time to change them. I tried the ruff the bit up..but that does not always work in the long term. They do spin and wear out the inner metal until they no longer hold a bit in place. They seem to wear out fast these days....cheaper materials perhaps? The keyless chuck....is not a much better choice than the collet....they last just about as long. I find myself replacement of them just as often although I do not know if it is a salt rust issue on that one???? ... another issue I have with bits flying is the death grip on the bit ....which is a pain in the rear end to get out. But in all part replacements are part of owning power tools, just wish they were not so expensive. I have also oiled the keyless chuck....not sure if it does any good on tightening the grip....in the end means going an buying a new replacement.....

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                    • #11
                      I suggest doing what others have mentioned. Drill or bit take a piece of sand paper and rub it up and down the shaft.. Just a few times to help get rid of the smooth and put a bit of a roughness.. You don't have to see it or feel that rough..
                      Doing this will probably revive the tools you now feel are junk..

                      Willwog

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                      • #12
                        Nice work and really like the inlays, Gordart...thanks for posting.
                        Bill
                        Living among knives and fire.

                        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                        • #13
                          well, I just tried to post something and it came out plain gibberish. So I deleted it all. It looked perfect in my preview, but........
                          Last edited by Gourdart; 07-14-2019, 11:44 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Nice job on the gourds. Always nice to see something different on the forum.

                            Tinwood

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                            • #15
                              [FONT=tahoma, geneva, sans-serif][SIZE=14px]Thank you for input and compliments! After checking out some terminology, I realize I have a Jacobs chuck. I have tried keeping it
                              dust free, but it seems like I am just blowing the dust down into it! I will try ruffing up the bur shaft and see what happens, but I have gotten a new
                              one, just in case. I am also thinking about getting a micro carver. Much easier to hold and work with. The dremel hand piece and flex shaft are heavy and awkward for me handle. Gotta set my arm on a support for better control.

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