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Which of These Micromotor Tools Should I Consider?

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  • Which of These Micromotor Tools Should I Consider?

    I am considering purchasing a micromotor tool to replace an expired RAM Microtorque II unit. My choices include a RAM icube and a RAM 45. The only difference between the two alternatives is the icube power supply is a 50 watt unit and the RAM 45 is a 60 watt unit - both have a max speed of 45,000 rpm.

    My question is this: In your opinion(s) is a 10 watt differential a significant contributor to torque , or are these units basically the same?
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    Last edited by Trapper John; 01-19-2022, 04:52 PM.

  • #2
    Assuming motor efficiency is the same, more watts means more power. Not sure how to ascertain motor efficiency without a test on the ground. And we all know about "assume", right?

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    • #3
      I have the Icube and love it, but have never had a different micro-motor so I have nothing to compare too. I use it for detailing only, so not sure how important "power" is in a micro-motor. I carve birds, and occasionally find it a bit of a hassle to get in some areas with the hand-piece being in the way relative to other part of the carving...I would look at hand-piece design more than raw power if I ever replaced my unit. Just my opinion.

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      • #4
        I have the RAM 45 and I have no problems with it, the only time it will bog down and turn itself off is when I get carried away and apply way to much pressure. Remember this is a micromotor, not a shaft drive so it won't hog out material like a Dremel or Foredom. I used it on a piece of oak firewood this weekend to make a wood spirit and never bogged it down. I think either would work well for you.

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        • #5
          Thanks for your advice, guys. I have a RAM Turbotorque II that has died and I am looking for a replacement. This unit is used for fine detail and I use my Foredom to "hog out" material when I first turn to my blank. It is almost intuitive that more watts equals more torque. I simply am trying to match my budget with the results and the extra "oomph" needs to justify the incremental price difference between the two. At present the icube seems to be the winner, but the jury's still out!

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          • #6
            Way I see these units are so fragile more watts equal the sooner the sucker will kick the bucket.
            . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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            • #7
              So, DiLeon, what do you suggest for an alternative? (Not trying to be contentious; just eager to get back to carving.)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Trapper John View Post
                So, DiLeon, what do you suggest for an alternative? (Not trying to be contentious; just eager to get back to carving.)
                I will jump in here and wonder? I have looked at both of the items and it seems that the power unit is in your hand. Powered by a foot controller ? I have 2 different units, one is a cheapy from harbor fright and the other is a Dremel, both have a cable drive and hand held. I do a lot of my carving sans knife with these 2 guys than I have a large battery hand held Dremel unit for heavy grinding out. But I do a lot with my trusty knives.

                I agree with DiLeon on one part about the fragility of these units, and when they break I just saw a tuber showing how to rebuild a RAM 45 unit. Now a 300.00 unit and you have to rebuild it. ?
                And as it is said the jury is still out, like an engine in a car is bigger really better.
                Good luck in your venture and choice.
                Chuck
                Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

                https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Trapper John View Post
                  So, DiLeon, what do you suggest for an alternative? (Not trying to be contentious; just eager to get back to carving.)
                  That is a hard question... as for me...right now... I am using cheap Chinese micromotors for manicures that do not last...using them for the most limited usage. The micromotors are so fragile she can not hold up to my environment even when they have their own toolboxes this includes the expensive ones. As I can state they are no Makita which is about the only tool with the lasting build. When I want extreme detail it is the air compressor etcher, which is a major investment for any beginner. Foredom of Blackstone industries has the best tools still and yet their new lower end micromotor is five hundred dollars and got a three-star rating which says a lot...that nothing has changed

                  Honestly, the bottom line needs more experience with using the mini dockyard chisels sets, (which do not break down) and I still have them after eight years.... which equals time for example Ed is learning how to get better with the design and tools. This means learning how to do extremely small detail work is a matter of not the tools but the person using it. I can hand sand those areas with a chuck bit grip shaped like a pencil using my diamond bits. Honestly, power carving is a big investment that does not last the years due to machine repairs and break down. I am slowly moving toward all hand tools. As I have seen carvers in third world countries carve extreme detail work with only regular chisel tools and just a few. They are sanded not power carved for a finish. Micromotors are great while they last and if you got money to throw away or to play with. So the alternative is mini dockyards chisels and gouges, pencil grip for diamond bits, and experience.
                  Last edited by DiLeon; 01-22-2022, 09:28 AM.
                  . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                  • #10
                    Thanks, Di, for your detailed response to my query. I have decided to replace my micromotor control box with a similar unit. I see your point, but at my age I would need to spend too much time learning how to detail using hand chisels and then researching and ordering the "correct" micro-detailers.

                    I count the number of years I think I have left and conclude it is wiser to spend now on familiar tools than to invest time learning yet another skill. (That is to say I have trouble enough with my carving skills as they are currently found, lol.) It's the age-old problem of staying or straying from one's comfort zone. I guess I'll stay with what I know at this late date. So the RAM Microtorque has been replaced with a similar unit.


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                    Last edited by Trapper John; 01-22-2022, 03:09 PM.

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                    • #11
                      I have the Icube and have had no problems with it at all. I also have the Mastercarver micro and it is great also no problems. The Icube is cheaper. I like both of them!

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                      • #12
                        I bit the bullet and just unboxed a replacement control box - a Microtorque. (0-45k rpm, foot/manual control, reversable, 110v.) When my 1/16" burs arrive I will see how they perform for fine detailing of my wolf carving. In the mean time I'll use a variety of hand and power tools before I get re-acquainted with my painting skills. I plan on using a layered approach with acrylic paint.

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