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  • arbotech durability

    Hi, it looks as if the forum is working better. Good maybe I can spend more time here again, but in the meantime i ahve a guestion. I have a automach 100 that just took a dive. the handpiece is kaput and the cable broke. They want rought 190 for a new handpiece and 100 for the cable. I am thinking for that much money it should run forever anyway I dont wnat to spend that much when i can get the arbotech chisel for roughly 250 but I am concerned about its durability. Anyone here have one and have there been any issues. I dont like things that break. The power carver is my go to tool as I carve a lot of bowls in maple, and cherry. So power is important.
    If someone has a review on durability of this tool I would appreciate sharing. I will give you my email as it is still a bit difficult to log in this forum for me.

    [email protected]

    I would appreciate any comments pro or con and I usaully use the power chisel quite a bit, about 3-4 hours a day so it will get worked. thanks for any help anyone wants to provide. My assumtion is that they are a very strong machine.

  • #2
    Re: arbotech durability

    You might want to consider something like an Ingersoll-Rand air-hammer ($50) with a quick-change chisel set. If I needed that, I\'d be fully prepared to \"modify\" some gouges to weld onto shanks for the I/R.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      Re: arbotech durability

      yeah robson i tried a power chisel off the air compressor and it cuts [after i spent a half hour puting a edge on the chisel] but it like jumps all over the place. there seems to be little control which might work for knocking off big chunks of wood but for any type of getting close to the line work its too unwieldly. of course maybe its the tool and a better tool would work better.

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      • #4
        Re: arbotech durability

        Seems to me that tools in that class are meant for shaping, not finesse and finishing work. I\'d want a couple of bent gouges to kiss off the ridges and take it to the line.
        Brian T

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        • #5
          Re: arbotech durability

          Rick, have you got this corrected yet? How have you been?
          Carve On,
          Kadiddle

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          • #6
            Re: arbotech durability

            Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
            You might want to consider something like an Ingersoll-Rand air-hammer ($50) with a quick-change chisel set. If I needed that, I\\\\\\\'d be fully prepared to \\\\\\\"modify\\\\\\\" some gouges to weld onto shanks for the I/R.
            Hi.

            As always, Robson\'s posts always intrigues me, mainly because he always seems to thing outside the box. I am in for some Hernia operations today, and looks like I will have to curtail my present penchant for larger projects like Renovations, building decks, Deck roofs and carports for my 4wd plus the normal building jobs and landscaping you do for your grown up kids.

            Fortunately, I should have more time now for Woodcarving.

            What Robson said about the Air hammer intrigued me. I never thought it possible to use it for Woodcarving. I have a small air hammer gathering dust. Perhaps Robson might like to do a separate post regarding his thoughts.

            Pete

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            • #7
              Re: arbotech durability

              I was wondering if a more industrial/production tool might be more durable for the rough-out work, lots of it, in hard woods. That has to beat the hello out of any tools. I would have expected better control over the action. . . . maybe different gouge shapes?

              I do a pattern of Forstner holes, about an inch down with each pass, and bash out the webbing then go again. But the hardest wood I\'ve carved so far has been birch and that doesn\'t say much.

              Been quite an exercise but my striking accuracy with both the elbow adze and the D adze is steadily improving. I look to find reasons to use them as often as I can (Kestrel Tool blades.)

              I\'ll get a little further into a big feast dish then show&tell.
              Brian T

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