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Best fine line drawing nib(s)

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  • Best fine line drawing nib(s)

    Ok so I'm getting into more detail. What are the best drawing fine line nibs? For Colwood or that will fit Colwood. How is the smallest ball nib?

  • #2
    Hi Pyro
    The smallest ball tip is ball # 1, visit Colwood web site, they have actual size pis of all their tips, I use the removable tip as they are a lot cheaper then the fixed tip pens
    Hope this helps
    Bruce

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    • #3
      I use a small skew that has a rounded heel for fine lines. You can also lightly hone them for a sharper edge. I think they are meant for doing straight lines on primary feathers? And don't forget that you can bend different spoon shaders and other tips for the right angles with a pair of pliers.
      'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

      http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
      http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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      • #4
        What would be nice is Colwood show wood burned with all their nib styles. I still need to know how fine a line the ball makes visually etc...

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        • #5
          I like the RT-KR (5/32 inch) Rounded Heel and the 1mm ball tip. These are my most used tips for fine work.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pyro View Post
            What would be nice is Colwood show wood burned with all their nib styles. I still need to know how fine a line the ball makes visually etc...
            I think it might be hard to do that, as the temperature setting and the force applied when using it, and how long it was held in one spot would probably cause quite a variation in the line or how it appeared. I don't have a ball tip of any size, so I can't help with that. But I would think Carver33 has some good suggestions. I took one of the Colwood "writing" tips and ground it to a sharp point that I use for stippling; but the size varies with heat and pressure and it isn't a tremendously fine line like you may be used to with pen/ink. It is more like a dull pencil in size and I suspect the ball tips will perform similar. I use the skew for fine lines, like bird feathers, which may be several hundred per inch. I find it works closer to a fine ink nib, but you have to practice to be able to use it for curves effectively.
            'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

            http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
            http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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