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  • Removing Ink

    Does anyone have suggestions for removing ink after completing a burning? I have burned a number of items including the mona lisa and the constitution but always there is the nice brown burn but there remains some black ink. I use ink transfer because the pictures are too complex to use tracing paper. I had poor results with heat transfer and now am using acetone. It works great but I can't get rid of the annoying residual ink. And suggestions?

  • #2
    I don't know about Ink , but to remove Pencil and Carbon Paper Marks I always do a LIGHT Sanding. If the Ink doesn't penetrate to much that might work. Merle

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    • #3
      I wonder what the carrier was for the pigment in the ink.
      Any possibility to scrape it off? (cabinet scraper-style?)
      Any kind of a juicy solvent and it might just soak in further.

      If you have to do that, every different alcohol dissolves different things.
      Genuine "rubbing alcohol" is isopropanol. It will dissolve dried acrylic paints (and clean out airbrushes).
      Make up a fake scrap of wood+ink and try it.
      If the "rubbing alcohol" they try to sell you is only denatured ethanol, it won't work.
      Brian T

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      • #4
        Alcohol sometimes helps in like shirt pockets ?????????
        . . .JoeB

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        • #5
          Sanding and returning along the line if needed is your best choice. The problem with most liquid options is they will most likely just turn an ink line into a larger ink stain.
          Randy

          WE LIVE IN THE LAND OF THE FREE BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE!

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          • #6
            Are you suggesting completing the burning and then sanding over the ink and reburning in the areas affected?

            I will check if I have isopropranol.

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            • #7
              Isopropanol is a better solvent than even denatured ethanol or methanol.
              The deal is, you have to mess with this to match the ink (mystery to us) that you used.
              Just experiments to learn that 'X' solvent will dissolve brand 'Y' ink.

              Maybe you best use graphite and not ink??? I have red, blue and white transfer papers.
              I have graphite transfer paper. I have sooty, greasy carbon transfer paper that has to be carved off.
              Brian T

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              • #8
                Keep in mind that if you use graphite tracing paper most markings can easily be erased by an eraser. Never use copy carbon paper.

                Depending on the ink, sometimes ink can be removed with a typewriter ink eraser.


                Bill
                Living among knives and fire.

                http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                • #9
                  The burning pattern are too precise for me to use tracing paper. I had a new thought- has anyone ever sealed the wood prior to an ink transfer, then burned? I wonder if sealing the wood would prevent the ink from penetrating and thus make it easier to remove.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by majer1898 View Post
                    The burning pattern are too precise for me to use tracing paper. I had a new thought- has anyone ever sealed the wood prior to an ink transfer, then burned? I wonder if sealing the wood would prevent the ink from penetrating and thus make it easier to remove.
                    What type of transfer paper do you use...or just a pen?

                    Warning: most sealers are toxic to burn on/over.

                    I am a pyrographer and founded a newsletter and also a member of several large pyrography forums for years. We have discussed transfer techniques constantly and there are some more complex methods of transfer (Ink Jet printer, acetone), but in the end it came down to Saral graphite paper. The poor person answer is to just rub a pencil over the back side of a pattern and use it as a graphite transfer paper.

                    We had pyrographers from all over the world beating the same question to death. Final answer was the graphite transfer paper just about every time.

                    I'd suggest not trying to re-invent the wheel...but if you do, please post since many are interested.

                    Good luck.
                    Last edited by woodburner807; 01-31-2019, 08:22 PM.
                    Bill
                    Living among knives and fire.

                    http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                    • #11
                      I agree with the graphite paper 100%. I have to say, I too was wondering if you where just drawing the pattern with ink. If so, why ink? Why not soft lead? A cheap graphic pencil and some "F" lead, dark lines and eras-ability. Anyway, do let us know what you decide to do, maybe we will learn something.
                      Is this what you are doing? https://www.instructables.com/id/Ima...nsfer-to-Wood/ If so, that changes things. I have no experience with this, maybe some one else does?
                      Last edited by sappy; 02-01-2019, 12:49 PM. Reason: curiosity caused web creeping

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sappy View Post
                        I agree with the graphite paper 100%. I have to say, I too was wondering if you where just drawing the pattern with ink. If so, why ink? Why not soft lead? A cheap graphic pencil and some "F" lead, dark lines and eras-ability. Anyway, do let us know what you decide to do, maybe we will learn something.
                        Is this what you are doing? https://www.instructables.com/id/Ima...nsfer-to-Wood/ If so, that changes things. I have no experience with this, maybe some one else does?
                        I'll have to try the harder lead , I've alway used 9mm-4B or softer, thanks for the the other info.


                        . . .JoeB

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                        • #13
                          "F"lead is one grade softer than HB. I use 4B (4 grades softer than F) art pencils and/or graphite sticks from an art supply place.
                          The really soft lead didn't leave a dent groove in the soft woods that I like to carve.
                          Brian T

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                          • #14
                            I use .5mm HB leads and guess I could go softer but no engineering drawing places here...but I will check on Amazon for the 4B...good tip.

                            When I was in the engineering world I actually used .3 mm but it broke off the mechanical pencil easily. I write with a lot of force, so the 4B is something I should try.

                            But you are correct Brian, pressure will mark the wood as a scribe/stylus does...especially basswood. Again, I write with a lot of pressure. OK off to Amazon.

                            Bill
                            Living among knives and fire.

                            http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                            • #15
                              I must not have been clear- I am doing ink transfers using a laser jet printer with acetone as the transferring agent. I have found that I can't trace complicated patterns- such as famous paintings and even if I could- I haven't found a tracing paper that erases with an eraser, maybe I am using the wrong brands. I did experiment with sealants and found beeswax allows the ink to wipe cleanly off but unfortunately when burning using the beeswax the ink sinks into the wood as the beeswax melts and can not be removed. I did try Krylon, oil, shellac and butcher block wax. None work very well.

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