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Torching a feather

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  • BeckyN
    replied
    That looks waaaay prettier than mine

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Becky
    There was a fad a few years ago in NZ for burnt wood furniture. We used a gas burner which scorches the surface of the wood pretty quickly and you can control the colour easily.

    You can get a small gas burner from a hardware store for a few $ not expensive.

    For the fine work you are doing I would brush it off with a fine brass wire brush which is nowhere as harsh as the steel wire brushes. This way the finish will be smoother and then I would burnish it with a soft cloth to fill any small scratches with colour and give you a nice finish.

    Couple of photos attached of pine done this way with wire brush finish just to give you some idea of the outcome. You will see that the colour varies a lot on this wood.

    Hope this helps.

    Attached Files

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  • BeckyN
    replied
    They are an awesome breed, but not meant for everyone, they are severely territorial and very good protectors. We are hoping he is perfect for keeping the bears at bay, while I greenhouse.
    I used to be a great pyrenees fan, but always wanted a CO.
    Having a blast, and he doesn't mind being my carving company!
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  • woodburner807
    replied
    Never heard of the breed, Becky, but looked it up and a great dog and a nice big one also. We had St. Bernard's at one time but Leo looks like he will be a lot larger. We are dog lovers and he has captured our hearts. If younger we would think about one...too old now and not fair to the dog when we go.

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    Don't teach him to play fetch, if you do you'll never get anything done∙∙∙∙the voice of experience

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  • BeckyN
    replied
    10 weeks old today, a Caucasian Ovcharka. A few years in the planning, to get this big guy.
    His name is Leo

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  • woodburner807
    replied
    That puppy looks adorable and can see why your time was spent with it. What breeds? How old?

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  • BeckyN
    replied
    Sorry I took so long to reply, a certain something is taking up my time!
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  • BeckyN
    replied
    Tons if great advice!
    i do agree, way to dark for me too! Thankfully just a test try.
    i don't use or want ro try painting.
    i can burn in the bbq so fumes are not an issue.
    i used a brush yesterday, tub brush, lol, it is a bit better,but I definitely list a lot of the fine details of the feathering. The grooves are really hard to get burnt without over burning the entire piece.
    suze is 7 inches long and almost 2 inches wide . End result is intended to hang on rearview mirrors etc, with sinew ties.
    loving the input! Keep them coming! Carving out feather number 2, as another test!
    My original designs take too bloody long, 45 minutes each side of the feather, so 45 times 4, plus the 30 minutes to carve, wasn't financially feasible. This is the original design.
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  • Brian T
    replied
    Sorry. I thought that it was clear. Burn first, fix then finish.

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  • woodburner807
    replied
    Be careful burning over any finish because it can be toxic. Not sure exactly what effect you are looking for, but maybe just do it in oil paint?

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  • Brian T
    replied
    I think it looks fine. I like the smoothed appearance of the feather fiber.
    Q: how big is it? Don't hesitate to carve 24" and 36" feathers.

    A propane bottle torch is used here commonly to burn the fuzzies off a chainsaw carving (then wire brush) and/or to put black fur on a chainsaw bear. Spray the first poly coat out of a rattle can to "fix" the charcoal so it can withstand some brush work. Same as artists do to fix charcoal, chalk, Conte' and pastel drawings.

    Not all many big feathers are monochrome. Other than Ravens and Crows. Lots of different patterns might look more "acceptable" in the viewer's head.
    These are a bit complicated:

    RIMG0031.JPG

    A single feather to the First Nations here is emblematic of the speaker. Everyone else is expected to listen. The holder of the feather (usually eagle) must speak the truth.

    Tom Lafortune carved a "fist and a feather" as a gift for our Provincial Health Officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry. It is indicative of her work all during this Covid-19 mess. Must be 36" tall.

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    Becky, if you look at some of my latest carvings, look at the background, if this is a color that would interest you, let me know and I give the two-part stain that I use

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  • Randy
    replied
    As was shared do not work so close to you project. Also deferent woods reacted deferentially to heat. I would work with scrap from this wood you are using to learn what works best on it.

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    I'd go over what you have with a brass bristle brush, if you want to try to salvage this one.

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