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Walking Away

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  • #16
    Re: Walking Away

    I agree with Tony, It just drew me in to it. Excellent Bill.

    What type of finish is on it and if it don't have any what are you going to put on it?

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    • #17
      Re: Walking Away

      Originally posted by Kenny_S View Post
      What type of finish is on it and if it don't have any what are you going to put on it?

      Tony and Kenny, thanks for the compliments.

      Kenny - I used two fairly heavy coats of "Krylon UV resistant Acrylic Coating" in the Gloss finish and then a final coat of the Same stuff in a Matte finish.

      I like the product because it claims (and as far as I can tell) that it doesn't yellow, and that it dries fairly quickly.

      I use the gloss coats so I can tell that I have full coverage, then top coat with matte for a natural look.

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      • #18
        Re: Walking Away

        To echo everyone else: great job. But I have to ask how this was done. I can't help but to see a burn done so well like this one and feel very much a beginner.
        How do you get the image to look so much like a photograph? Do you tansfer an image and then burn over it? Or is this free-hand? If it's free-hand, I think I'm quitting!
        Thanks for the tips.
        Pol

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        • #19
          Re: Walking Away

          Originally posted by Pol View Post
          To echo everyone else: great job. But I have to ask how this was done. I can't help but to see a burn done so well like this one and feel very much a beginner.
          How do you get the image to look so much like a photograph? Do you tansfer an image and then burn over it? Or is this free-hand? If it's free-hand, I think I'm quitting!
          Thanks for the tips.
          Pol
          Pol,

          I have been using photos that I've taken over the last several years, and here's how I've been using them for burning. I keep a copy of the photo handy and refer to it while completing the project.

          I print the photo to the appropriate size and use graphite paper to transfer it to the piece of wood. I transfer outlines and major features and generally sketch a line where major wrinkles and such are located.

          In the case of faces and clothing, I usually use a 1mm ball tip and completely burn the base tone to the object I'm working on. In this case, I started with the jacket, then went to the jeans next.

          After burning the base shade, I over-burn the dark shadows just enough that they stand out from the background color. I then continue darkening the shadows and blending them to the background color, until all that's left of the background are the very lightest highlights. While doing this, I employ a little "artistic license" by eliminating, adding or re-shaping some shadows until they look right to me. In this case, the jeans were pretty faithfully reproduced with the exception of eliminating some minor wrinkles, and believe it or not, thinning out the baggy areas (the young nowadays sure do like their baggy clothes). In all cases, I may burn over some areas 10 or even 20 times, until I'm satisfied that the shades are dark enough and full blended.

          One of the problems with translating photos to pyrography, is that many similar shades are differentiated by color, but have the same tonal value. You have to make judgments on how to differentiate the adjacent areas by either lightening or darkening one or the other. In so doing, this will impact the remaining area of the object, so that it also has to be adjusted to look correct. I do this simply by playing with it until it look right to me. In this case, the shadows of the sleeves had to be darkened to make them stand out from the background. If they were made lighter, they would have blended into the remainder of the jacket.

          The path he's walking on had many more divots then I depicted, but I just used the ball tip to randomly place shadows until it looked right to me. There was also litter (some leaves, twigs, etc.) that I attempted to reproduce, but I wasn't happy with the initial results, so I scratched them out and left just the divot shadows.

          The brush on the sides of the path are a general representation of the actual, that were done primarily with a shader tip held at a very high angle to give the impression of stalks and dabbed to give the grain head impression at the tops.

          The railing was actually galvanized pipe, and I didn't like the look, so I substituted a board rail using a skew tip to draw the grain pattern and a shader to give some mre "life" to it.

          The trees in the background bear no resemblance to the trees in the photo. I simply sketched in the major shadows with the shader and after some trial and error, ended up just sub-dividing the shadows with the ball tip until I was fairly satisfied that they were as far as I could take them.

          I hope this response wasn't more than you bargained for.

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          • #20
            Re: Walking Away

            No, that was great, and I really appreciate it. I'm in awe of some of the burnings I see here and I want to perfect my skill to get close. Thanks so much! It was really helpfull!

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            • #21
              Re: Walking Away

              Bill, very nice burning! Thanks for the explanation on how you did it. Mixed blessing going back to work! Hope you keep carving, burning and posting!Glad you are able to work though!
              My ETSY shop:
              https://www.etsy.com/shop/WoodforddellDesigns

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              • #22
                Re: Walking Away

                Wow Bill that is a fabulous piece.

                Nedra

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                • #23
                  Re: Walking Away

                  Sharon and Nedra, thanks for the compliments and well wishes.

                  Although I have to go back to work, I'll still find some time to carve and burn. I just won't be posting quite so prolifically.

                  As for the explanation of how the piece was done, that's just my method - a lot of trial and error. I love to pass on things that I learn. I also hope to pick up pointers and techniques from other pyrographers on these forums.

                  One thing I'd like to pass on is the use of the relatively new ball tip from Colwood. I picked up the 1 mm version and fell in love with the things you can do with it. I urge others to pick up one and give it a try.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Walking Away

                    Bill, it's nice that people develop their own style of burning. One teacher I know used to tell her students her style was the only way to burn and actually ridiculed other styles. I found that very narrow minded. I always encourage students to learn what they can from everyone, experiment and find what works for them.

                    The ball tips are not new, just new to Colwood. I applauded them when they finally agreed to make them. I primarily use the small ball tips (their 1 mm and Razertip .8 mm) but I do love them for their versatility and I always recommend them to people. Most that try them love them.

                    I know it's tough working and trying to find time for everything. When I retired from my job with the VA I went full time with our business and teaching. I could never figure how I found the time for anything when I worked.

                    This year I finally decided it was time to set some priorities. Since I didn't have enough time for everything something (s) had to go so I kind of retired from teaching so I could spend more time on my art and I don't spend much time on message boards anymore. No regrets but I still don't have enough time in the day.

                    I still do a little teaching but now I focus more on working with gourds which I find to give me more freedom of creativity and I can burn or combine other techniques, such as carving and painting and ause variety of mediums. I think that living in New Mexico has definately impacted on my art and I want to go with it.

                    Anyway, enjoy and hope to see more of your work from time to time.

                    Nedra

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                    • #25
                      Re: Walking Away

                      Bill, your pyrography is absolutely awesome. Thanks for the detailed explanation of how you did it. I'm glad you're well enough to go back to work, but I, too, will miss seeing as much of your work. At least you will be continuing to burn and can once again carve, so we'll still be able to enjoy seeing some of your pieces.

                      Beth

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