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Pheasant On Birch

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  • #31
    Re: Pheasant On Birch

    Nancy that raccoon is outstanding! thanks Dave
    "Lif iz lik a box "o" choc lets, ya nevr kno whut yull git!"

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    • #32
      Re: Pheasant On Birch

      Hi Nancy your raccoon is lovely very soft I think you'd enjoy woodburning for sure. Yes, this has been a good discussion on tonal values. Susan is the real expert but I can tell you how I transform my color image to grayscale. I have a photo program on my computer called Photoshop Elements. I scan my color photo into my photo program, then I click on 'Image' on the top task bar. Then scroll down to 'Mode' and click on it--then click on 'Grayscale' click on the option to turn your color image into grayscale. Save your image and print it. Then you'll have an excellent tonal (dark to light or visa versa) reference for woodburning. My photo program isn't the best but does a pretty good job. I'm sure Susan and other will be able to help you even further--Hope this helps.
      Kathy
      LOL-Susan and Dave we must have all been answering close to the same time--because when I checked is see my answer you all had answered before me. Quick on the click--tee heeTalking

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      • #33
        Re: Pheasant On Birch

        Nancy great job on the Racoon, it looks like a photograph, good to have you back.

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        • #34
          Re: Pheasant On Birch

          I didn't ask my REAL question !! DUH.
          A gray-tone program would help on some projects but not at all on a sone starting from a pencil sketch, right?
          In my wildlife paintings - all done in tube acrylics on gesseoed masonite - I depend 100% on COLOR to get me anywhere.....layers and layers of color.
          Without color - just brown on brown - where do I start?

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          • #35
            Re: Pheasant On Birch

            Nancy! You can't have color without value!

            OK ... if I get to simple or too boring, my apologizes but I am assuming that others are also reading these postings. And to be clear, before someone blasts me I am only talking about color paints ... not the colors in light Smile

            Inside the human eye you have rods and cones. Now, I may get these backwards as it's been a while. But if I remember the rods see color and that's all they see. The cones see light, shades of gray, and that's all they see. The rods and cones send the info to the brain which puts the two pictures together. It overlays the color that the rods see to the black and white that the cones see. So you have a color photo transposed over a black and white ... everything that the eye sees contains both photos!

            Color, also called hue, include the primaries of red, yellow, and blue. In paint these are usually Cadmium Red Medium, Cadmium Yellow Medium, and Ultramarine Blue. The secondary colors are orange, green, and purple which are created by mixing two primary colors ... red + blue (both primaries) = purple (secondary).

            Value, also called gray scale, are how dark - how much black, or how light - how much white a color/hue contains. Value is determined by how much light reaches a particular surface in the painting as well as the color of the surface.

            Examples:
            Lemon Yellow is a pale value of primary yellow where Yellow Ochre is a dark value.
            Pastel blue is a pale value of primary blue where wedgewood blue is a dark value.
            Peach is a pale value of the secondary orange where burnt sienna would be a dark value.

            Now all that means is if you are painting an apple red you will have areas of peachy pink where the sunlight hits it and areas of burgundy where it is in the shadows. The peaches are pale values, the red is the medium value and the burgundy is the dark value.

            My "Orangeman" is a primary color painting. There were five colors on my palette - red, yellow, blue, white, and black. Every color hue is either directly from that palette or mixed from that palette. The changes in the value then come from the addition of black, white, or gray.

            So, If you give me permission I will "snich" a copy of your raccoon and gray scale him for you. You will quickly see that he has lots and lots and lots of tonal values !!!!

            Did I answer your question ?

            Susan

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            • #36
              Re: Pheasant On Birch

              OK ... this stupid forum ate my paintings !!!!!!


              Susan

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              • #37
                Re: Pheasant On Birch

                Nancy,

                As I must get my bottom in gear and get to work this morning and may not be able to get back to the forum until much much later I am going to assume your permission to gray scale your raccoon. Besides, when I did gray scale him he is a glorious example of tonal values through color

                Susan

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                • #38
                  Re: Pheasant On Birch

                  Opps ... it's still eating attachments!

                  Susan

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                  • #39
                    Re: Pheasant On Birch

                    Nancy your racoon looks really good in grayscale too.
                    Susan, good job on the explanation and color to grayscale you must have been exhausted.
                    One of my instructors said it to this effect and mirror's part of your explaination.
                    If we lived in a world which had light but no color, we would see everything we now see--houses, trees, flowers, people--but everything would be seen in terms of gray. Some objects would be light gray, some dark gray. Some objects would be white, others black. Objects would be seen only by the quanity of light they reflect. These measurments of light quanity are called 'light values'.
                    Since we live in a world of color, the value of a color is the amount of light that it contains. We tend to judge some colors as lighter than they actually are because of their warmth or brilliance. Because of the coolness of other colors, we judge them as darker than they really are. The color white reflects all color and it is the lightest value. The color black absorbs all color and it is the darkest value.
                    Whew.....off to burn some wood.....another thought our woodburns actually aren't black and white--they are values of sepia so I have to think darkest brown and palest creamy white. Hummm maybe making a sepia value scale would be a good exercise. But not right now I feel the need to burn some wood! I'm about 75% complete on my lantern will upload when it get it finished.
                    Kathy

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                    • #40
                      Re: Pheasant On Birch

                      Well done Susan, that is an excellent description. I grey scale quite often, using Corel Draw or Adobie Photoshop, but your explanation really helps me understand what's going on.

                      Nancy....I love the little critter! Beautiful job! Another lady of many talents.

                      We are so lucky on this board....having such an array of wonderfully talented folks who enjoy sharing their gifts with us all. The specifics are too numerous to try to identify......I would be sure to miss someone.....I am just thankful to one and all, that they are with us and willing share their God given gifts so freely.

                      Bob
                      Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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                      • #41
                        Re: Pheasant On Birch

                        Smile Agree with you totally Bob, and Cheers cheers to Susan for being so helpful!
                        Kathy

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