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  • Daroc
    started a topic Sanding

    Sanding

    I read in Wayne's Chip carving book that he sands before chipping. Is this a must do - just got the knives yesterday and started practicing.

  • brent
    replied
    Newer sandpaper is not as bad as the old, usual garnet paper. As you sanded, bits of the garnet would chip off exposing newer surfaces thereby leaving the grit it in or on the wood which could then dull your edges. I tried sanding after chip carving only to lose the sharp edge of the cuts. Using an erasure a little hard can cause pieces to pop out. I found that using graphite paper, then chipping, if any marks were left, I used an electric (battery) draftsman eraser. Worked great. Used light pressure. No pop outs. Swiss type sandpaper is what I know a good many carvers use because of its pliability and it doesn't leave much if any residue to dull the edges. No personal reason for the next statement other than being a satisfied customer, I purchase my Swiss (hold) sandpaper from Klingspor's Woodworking Shop.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    I see the need to keep a very flat surface.
    I'd use a cabinet scraper to cut that surface flat.
    They are very easy to make and cost me nothing but a little time.
    Sandpapers can only shred the wood fiber.

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  • BobD
    replied
    There's a couple reasons to sand before chip carving. First, these intricate patterns depend on an accurate drawing (or tracing). If the wood isn't smooth (at least 220-grit), the rougher wood can interfere with your lines. Second, unless you are very careful, it's easy to sand off the sharp corners of the chips you're carving. Some folks sand off any remaining marks from the pattern, but others use an abrasive eraser (Tombow Sand Eraser for example). These erasers are abrasive enough to remove the pencil/graphite marks without changing the shape of the chips. Third (and this really doesn't happen much) rough spots can affect the cuts. Chip cuts need to be smooth the length of the cut, and rough spots can affect your cut, especially if you're making a long cut and drawing your hand across the board.

    Best Regards,
    Bob Duncan
    Technical Editor, Woodworking/DIY

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  • Azelwood
    replied
    Just a thought - If you must sand before your carve make sure to use good quality paper with well bonded abrasive. And if sanding afterwards do the same but with paper mounted to a proper sanding block so you don't loose the definition of your carving....

    If carving regular section timber then a thicknesser might provide a good enough finish on which to start carving....?

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  • lionslair
    replied
    I suspect the reason is to remove the oxidized surface that is harder than under. Might try Green pads used to clean kitchen pans - no grit and the plastic might give a go on the surface. Just a thought. One side is hardened and the other softer. Be sure to keep the metal scraping stuff off as it will rust and stain wood. Not the copper but steel and maybe the SS - depending on the wood and SS.

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  • Steve Reed
    replied
    I'm with papsar, I always sand before to get the surface really smooth. After carving, I do a light sanding with 400 grit.

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  • Daroc
    replied
    Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

    What's your opinion of EZ Board? Do you like carving it as compared to wood?
    It's seems to be good for practice and perfect the technique. I don't have to worry about grain cuts and the hardness of the wood.

    I am using it cause I bought 4 boards - it's good for that. Cost is depending of how you get wood. Once it's gone I don't think I will buy more unless I need to practice something else. I have http://www.craftsmensupply.com/ near me and I will be getting most basswood from that source cause I can drive there. S&H costs are my determining factor. I spent $50 just on wood and the shipping cost would have added another $20-30.

    Hope this answers you're question.

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    Originally posted by Daroc View Post
    This sounds like the way to go I have a bunch will use them up and go from there. I got the knives last week and about to start using wood as soon as the ez board I bought is used up.
    What's your opinion of EZ Board? Do you like carving it as compared to wood?

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  • Daroc
    replied
    Originally posted by pallin View Post
    At the suggestion of my wife I have switched to using the foam sanding blocks used for shaping acrylic fingernails. They come in various grits and don't seem to leave any abrasive on the wood.
    This sounds like the way to go I have a bunch will use them up and go from there. I got the knives last week and about to start using wood as soon as the ez board I bought is used up.

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  • pallin
    replied

    At the suggestion of my wife I have switched to using the foam sanding blocks used for shaping acrylic fingernails. They come in various grits and don't seem to leave any abrasive on the wood.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arthur C.
    replied
    If sanding dulls my tools, I sharpen them. I don't sweat the small stuff, I just want to enjoy my carving.

    I have no doubt that those who caution against all sanding before or during carving are correct, but I'm an imperfect creature who's not always rational. I just want to chill when I'm carving and don't really care about the unseen consequences of my faulty reasoning in pursuit of relaxation. Let the chips fall where they may (Ha, ha.).

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  • papasar
    replied
    Always sand my cc plates with 400 and then 600 grit and then dry wipe. Never had a problem with dulling the blade
    Bill K.

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  • Bob K.
    replied
    I would personally caution against sanding before carving as the fine dust and grit (which you cannot see) left behind after sanding will tend to dull your tools.

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  • Daroc
    replied
    Originally posted by Dileon View Post
    They say,... do not sand until your finish that ... it is hard on the tools. Me I sand.....I need to see the shape of item so I can see what next needs to be shaped or cut....the more the detail, the more I sand. I never yet hurt my tools...it is rocks and metal in the wood ....that has made chips in my tools.
    Wayne says that it helps with doing the chip carving so that is why I asked.

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