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Cheating or Common Practice

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  • #16
    If I were making something odd or different - I can use my Steel Mill to slot out sections or flatten area. Just watch out for oil and for wood dust in the machine. I could turn on my lathe custom metal or shaping spaces - metal lathe and a wood lathe much like our wood band saws and metal band saws. Then up to the big tools :-) I have some Osage Orange / Horse Apple/ Bois D’arc
    limb after storing it for 20 years into a cylinder on my metal lathe. It is tough when dry. I have it drying in that state before I try to use it. So as some say it isn't the path to the end, it is the end that determines the art. We all use rotary tools to carve, grind, sand and drill. I have a favorite 1.5mm diamond pointed rod I use as a plunge drill. Martin

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    • #17
      Cheating implies deception. How do you deceive yourself? We've had some extended discussions of working with hand tools vs power. Cheating is involved only when someone misrepresents their processes to others.

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      • #18
        suppose you bought a rough out, and finished it . that wouldnt be cheating either, yet a power tool hogged off the waste wood.
        Denny

        photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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        • #19
          Tim, I use a rotary tool all the time with my carvings. After I'm done carving, texturing etc, I use a 1" maroon Scotch Brite square mounted to a mandrel in my rotary tool. I turn it to the lowest speed and run the pad all over the carving and crevices. Does great at clean up.
          Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
          My FB page:https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...7196480&type=3

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          • #20
            seems logical to consider the patent law a bit - e.g. don't draw Mickey Mouse just like he is and give it to someone. Can do it for your self / yours. Or simply have different eyes (who is perfect) different this and that. Music has 3-4 notes in a row. Anything we do - is not perfect like the original so the game is on. If in a book that teaches - it expects you to copy. If my skin crawls, I don't. I simply use my head.

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            • #21
              Not to kick a dead horse when he's down, but it definitely depends on what you personally mean by "cheating." I buy wood that's pre-fashioned by someone else (with more skill, knowledge, and, yes, power tools) than me, then I never touch it with anything but knives, sandpaper, and brushes. That's my deal, and I make sure people know that everything they see (in the actual carving part) when buying is done purely by hand -- no computers, no electricity. For some people, they might prefer if I used power tools so it'd be more perfect. Other people like knowing that it was done so simply and can accept some imperfections for it. I personally just like the satisfaction of hand-tools-only, and do my best to make it so people can't even tell if I used power tools or not.

              So, as said, if you indicate (either implicitly or explicitly) that no power tools were used, then it's definitely cheating. Otherwise, it's up to you. If you feel guilty (i.e. like you cheated) about it, then I might suggest not using power tools. But if you feel unfulfilled with the results without the power tools, then go for it and enjoy the extra beauty and intricacy they can bring.
              www.AgainstTheGrainChipCarvings.weebly.com
              www.facebook.com/AgainstTheGrainChipCarvings/
              www.etsy.com/shop/AgainstTheGrainChips

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              • #22
                I've had to use Dremel and Foredom plus other type to achieve the results that I wanted.

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                • #23
                  There is a tradition among some native (First Nation, Indian) carvers that all of the wood surfaces have tool marks such as adze cuts, even on totems or huge sculptures. A machined surface or raw split would not include the "mark" of the person creating the piece. Still, we all see a distinction between raw, ragged cuts vs artistic tool marks.

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                  • #24
                    I like textured surfaces, sometimes just a part of a carving, not all of it. "Cheating" would be to break a rule of a wood carving competition.

                    Even poles (totem, mortuary, story) in this day and time are trimmed and roughed out with chain saws of several sizes as needed.
                    I like this as it allows for the FN artists to express much more dramatic content than was done even 2 centuries ago.
                    Brian T

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                    • #25
                      First rule of woodcarving, there are no rules! Use what ever you can to get the effect you want.
                      Steve
                      Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
                      My FB page:https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...7196480&type=3

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                      • #26
                        Hum - not a Taxi person - but working on a chipmunk! Past few days, I've seen Beaver, several wild cats, Elk, deer, Ibis, Moose and a family pet dog of all things. Bless them. We lost ours after 17 years and still feel it after 2 more years. Still jump thinking I'm stepping on him or waking him up. Friends collect collections from other passed friends and their collections grow.

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                        • #27
                          there is no cheating in creating art. Whatever gets the job done. I am a power carver 98% of the time- I have had people tell me i'm not a "real carver" but when you take those same people who only use chisels and ask them to carve with power tools they don't know the first thing about it- shrug- its only different schools of thought. I use whatever works and when I teach people to carve i say the same thing - just use what works for you. Its art. and your angel is lovely!

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                          • #28
                            I have a form of muscular dystrophy and am losing the use of my carving hand. Power for me maybe the only option available if I'm going to continue to carve. People with arthritis may in the same boat.

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                            • #29
                              My definition of carving is: to affect the change in appearance of a piece of wood or stone by whatever means is available (sans computers) whether it's is by chisels, gouges, mallets, saws, sandpaper (for finish), turning on a lathe is a form of carving utilizing a machine to spin a piece of wood but employing the use of similar types of tooling.

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                              • #30
                                Jmo fwiw!!!!

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