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  • drhandrich
    replied
    thanks Di, and now i am curious enough to have a go at making my own lightweight pounder.

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  • Dileon
    replied
    123633.2.jpg
    Originally posted by drhandrich View Post
    Well said Dileon, I was wondering if you also sometimes use a nonskid sheet under the carving while tapping away at it. it seems like it might add just a hint of shock absorber to the method. the anti-slip stuff found for use in cupboards.
    I use a variety of things under my carving, depends on the wood I am using and what kind of cut I use...somethings are super fragile. I use a mat that I bought for non-skid....it is thicker but looks like the shelf mat. it is called Non Slip Sanding Router Pad for Woodworking,
    which is used most of the time.... except the cats' love to pee on it. cleaning it is not fun. I have those pads that are foam that you put on the floor to stand on...those are also great for things like this. Also I use old pillows to support and even to brace areas. I have a super thick canvas that was used for clay work ...it is nice for thin areas that can not have hardly any give. And the bad do not do what I do, my lap... Basic anything that will help absorb the impact of the hit and often I use a combination of these things. It is noted 99 percent of the time... I do not brace my carvings because I am non stop turning them to carve...Nonskid router pads are best for making sure they do not slide, cheap and on Amazon. Photo is a woodworker non-slip mat from Woodcraft best thing they do roll up nice to be put away.
    Last edited by Dileon; 01-11-2020, 06:57 PM.

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    I ordered the Shop Fox D2809 8-Ounce Brass Head Mallet that Di mentioned, to replace a much heavier lignum vitae mallet I bought many years ago when first starting out (a newbie mistake).

    This little tool is a gem, just the right weight and shape for palm tools...I've used it continuously since I clawed open the package yesterday. I can't imagine that I'll be doing any relief work in the future without using it.

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  • drhandrich
    replied
    good to know about the no slip mats. especially under a bench hook. thanks

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  • woodburner807
    replied
    I get the no-slip cabinet style for $1 per roll at the Dollar Store. It works fine for my applications.

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    Originally posted by drhandrich View Post
    Well said Dileon, i was wondering if you also sometimes use a nonskid sheet under the carving while tapping away at it. it seems like it might add just a hint of shock absorber to the method. the anti slip stuff found for use in cupboards.
    Denny, I use one of those mats when carving a relief that's too large for my bench hook. It works fairly well, but I find that the panel still moves enough that after a while I have to move it back into position. I also use the mat when carving a bark-on panel to keep the bark being knocked off by the bench hook.

    Also, when using my bench hook, I always have the mat under it.

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  • drhandrich
    replied
    Well said Dileon, i was wondering if you also sometimes use a nonskid sheet under the carving while tapping away at it. it seems like it might add just a hint of shock absorber to the method. the anti slip stuff found for use in cupboards.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dileon
    replied
    Other small mallets come under leather mallets and jewelry mallets. They come in every kind of material you can think of from leather, plastic, nylon, wood ...there is steel wrapped in leather or string and other soft materials. I have a rolled leather mallet that is shaped like a hammer and super lightweight...which I will use on occasion because it is soft I do not have to worry too much about damage to the tool. These mallets are used on making leather design or jewelry come in small sizes and weights often. They are made to use on various small size tools...and they come in all kinds of shapes. It depends on what kind you need to get whatever kind of job you have. When you look at these mallets often you can make your own. These tools can easily be used on a small carving tool. The ones in the picture are unusually shaped. Most are shaped as a normal mallet, maul or hammer. I do not have the grip to push tools, but I can handle a mallet that will do the work for me. When ordering you want ounces. vs pounds and shape that you know will work for your kind of carving. I did see one online which was brass wrapped in leather, that will be my next purchse>softhammer-4.jpg

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  • Dileon
    replied
    images (3).jfifThese are various kinds of wood carving brass mallets. It is noted there are also copper and steel ones. Each various sizes and weights and shapes. They are made lightweight, small short handles, and because of shape easy to move, unlike the full-size wood mallets. They are used on various kinds of the chisel, and small kinds of tools. You can find them by doing a search on your search engine such as google.... brass carving mallets then go to the top of the engine and push Image or photo....and you can see the various type photos ...next you see the bottom of the photo is normally the place you can purchase them. I go to Amazon...these mallets can go from ten dollars to a hundred. It is noted I prefer the brass ones and use them major on both carving knives and palm chisels...it is noted again do not hit our tools with a hard hit...you just want enough to push through the wood much the same as a chisel. But there are tons of other kinds of small tool mallets next post. When ordering make sure you note the weight and the size of the handle which will work best for you.

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  • Dileon
    replied
    Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

    Di, if I understand correctly, you say you use the small brass head mallet for taps on palm tools, but then say you have a leather head hammer for tools not made for mallet work. Since palm tools are designed to be pushed, and not made for mallet work, I'm confused.

    I currently use a lignum vitae mallet (rather heavy) when needed with palm tools, but would like a lighter one...wondering which do you recommend, the brass or leather for palm tools?
    Carving knives and palm chisels are not made for mallet work, especially with a big mallet. If you use a mallet on such an item the manufacturer will tell you to take a hike if you report the damage. But there are mallets made for small jobs or different kinds of tools. A wood tool such as brass mallet is ideal if you do not wack the tool too hard that you are using to cut. Again political correctness states both palm and knives are made to used by arm power push only,... by the people who make these items. But I am going to use mallets on the tools any way with this understanding.

    A leather mallet is a leather design tool ideal for the usage of smaller less stable tools due that it has some give in the head. Both have pros and cons which I will state in the next thread. Bigger, heavier, and hardwood mallet are to use with chisels and used for major hit...although they are made to swing in order to cut hardwood. They are also awkward, too big, and hard to move while doing small projects...and the size of mallet gets in the way of the visual site of the object to be cut. I read somewhere there is a mallet for the right job, and that is why I have all kinds and all sizes. Two posts below about the smaller mallet.
    Last edited by Dileon; 01-08-2020, 12:45 PM.

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    Originally posted by Dileon;n1170879 [B
    SNIP I use a small mallet on my palm tools...just a light wack is enough to get them to push through the wood. I have several small brass woodcarving mallets.... I love them for things like this. SNIP I even a have a leather head hammer type which is used on chisels that are not made for mallet work. SNIP
    Di, if I understand correctly, you say you use the small brass head mallet for taps on palm tools, but then say you have a leather head hammer for tools not made for mallet work. Since palm tools are designed to be pushed, and not made for mallet work, I'm confused.

    I currently use a lignum vitae mallet (rather heavy) when needed with palm tools, but would like a lighter one...wondering which do you recommend, the brass or leather for palm tools?
    Last edited by Arthur C.; 01-08-2020, 05:52 AM. Reason: Typo

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  • Dileon
    replied
    Originally posted by Sagitta View Post
    Claude;
    Exactly what I was thinking on my way into work tonight. Using a light mallet on the palm gouges. So my plan is to obtain a much better piece of wood for this project, then go at it again. I did learn tons by trying to carve on the basswood round with my first attempt. All part of the learning....Plus all y'all here have been a great source of information and guidance, thanks to all !!!

    Chris
    not sure if you got this per message....Shop Fox D2809 8-Ounce Brass Head Mallet is 11 dollars on Amazon and bigger one is double the price. Just search amazon small brass mallet. Narex 500 gram Brass Carving Mallet w/ Hornbeam Handle by Narex is 32 dollars on Amazon which is a nice brand....but these mallets do not break easy
    Last edited by Dileon; 01-07-2020, 02:12 PM.

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  • Dileon
    replied
    My fingers are extremely cripple from arthritis I use a small mallet on my palm tools...just a light wack is enough to get them to push through the wood. I have several small brass woodcarving mallets.... I love them for things like this. And I will also note that I have also used these for carving knives when the fingers are sore. Light hits so you do not damage the tools. I have about ten different kinds of mallets from huge to tiny each one is different wood or different materials depending on the job...I even a have a leather head hammer type which is used on chisels that are not made for mallet work. images (2).jfif
    Last edited by Dileon; 01-01-2020, 03:22 PM.

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  • Sagitta
    replied
    Originally posted by Randy View Post
    Great suggestions. I would just add I find the use of a chip carving knife to do the straight line of lettering works best for me. Then ,as has been shared, I use a gouge that corresponds to the shape of the curves when possible.
    I was pondering this one also. I Dabbled in some chip carving and like the feel of the chip knife and the control. I will definitely give this one a try...Thanks....
    Chris

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  • drhandrich
    replied
    many times i would prefer to use a good chip carving knife to get things started.

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