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Relief carving on an easel

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  • Relief carving on an easel

    I do all my relief carving flat on my carving desk, but I just saw a carver on another site who carves at an angle such as you would have on an easel. Does anyone here do that? Wondering what the advantage would be...suppose it might be less tiring on the back. I don't see any of the pros I know of doing it.
    Arthur

  • #2
    I have seen a carver use the same pow-r-arm I use for relief carving allowing it to be rotated and tilted as needed. He glues a piece of pine on the bottom to screw into.
    Ed
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
    Local club
    https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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    • #3
      Pyrographers use an adjustable easel sometimes. Not sure about how well it would work for carving. Probably ergonomics for wood carving working, Arthur. What ever helps the carving process is good. Worth a try...
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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      • #4
        The Rolls-Royce of carving platforms was made by Veritas (Lee Valley).
        I looked, I don't think that they make it any more as it was really expensive.

        You could sit or stand, lift the platform from zero to 90 degrees AND rotate as well.
        So, easy on the neck and easy on the back.
        You will need at least a square yard/square meter of floor and it looks like it weighs a ton.

        Attach a 3" thick x 36" circle of yellow cedar (eg from Karmanah) and get busy.
        Some Pacific Northwest First Nations carvers are using it (those who can afford it).
        Brian T

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        • #5
          If the carving tools you are using are similar to pencils, pens, or brushes, the easel worksurface might make sense. Most of my relief work is done clamped flat on a waist high table, almost all while standing. Sometimes I do light detail & incised lines holding the piece in my lap.

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          • #6
            I found it listed under Veritas, not Lee Valley. All 150 lbs of fit.

            http://www.veritastools.ca/Products/Page.aspx?p=174
            Brian T

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            • #7
              Aurthur If you google "tilt top carving benches youtube" you will see a number of diferent tiltable carving benches that work like an easle. I like that you do not have to bend as much I have used on a friend has. I have thought of making one that I could clamp to my bench but I just do not do that much releife carving.
              We live in the land of the free because of the brave!
              https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Randy View Post
                Aurthur If you google "tilt top carving benches youtube" you will see a number of diferent tiltable carving benches that work like an easle. I like that you do not have to bend as much I have used on a friend has. I have thought of making one that I could clamp to my bench but I just do not do that much releife carving.
                Randy, I was thinking the same thing...I could make one to clamp to my bench. I just don't know that it would find it helpful. It may be a solution in search of a problem.
                Arthur

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                • #9
                  I have seen a few people that used something like that, but most probably don't own or have anything set up for that. But I think one advantage would be that it would help with shadows. Most carvings would be displayed in a more vertical position, rather than flat on a table, so it would seem to help the process if you carved it in a similar position and was able to light it in a way for the shadows to be more natural? just a thought by someone who doesn't do relief and has no experience with it!
                  'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

                  http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
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                  http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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                  • #10
                    I do very little relief carving but I made me a small board with raised edges to hold the wood being carved in place. Carving Board.jpg

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

                      Randy, I was thinking the same thing...I could make one to clamp to my bench. I just don't know that it would find it helpful. It may be a solution in search of a problem.
                      I think it is more practical for those who do relief with rotary tools. I use a vise that holds small flat projects at a angle. I use it when doing jewlery or belt bucks and other small rotary relief carving. As pallin said pencil or marker shape tools. The one my friend made is 18" x 24" he made it out of two 3/4" plywood with a piano hinge attached to a 2"x 6" that he clamps to a workmate. And a triangle made of 2"x 6"attaches to the back. cheap and seem to work well.
                      We live in the land of the free because of the brave!
                      https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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                      • #12
                        If you visit Fred Zavadil's site, he has some videos of working on relief carvings. He has his carvings held upright as if on an easel while working with gouges.

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                        • #13
                          I looked at Fred's carving Santa YouTube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pa82jMqB0w0&t=11s I remembered watching it before. I speak from my experience in drafting when I say I couldn't carve like he does. If any of you know, the drafting board can be set at any angle for the user. I used to set mine somewhere around 15 to 20 degrees off the flat. Hmmm...same angle as sharpening. I wondered how I knew that angle so well.

                          Anyway, I've tried carving at different angles with mallet and tools and it's just not for me. I like carving by hand. So, If I was to carve relief--which in a sense I have just at a smaller scale--I would carve in my lap--or if it was too large, the wood piece would be slightly elevated on a table. It would be easier for me to rotate the piece and just keep on carving.

                          BobL

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                          • #14
                            IMG_0003.JPG IMG_0002.JPG Here is one I made years ago . With the Clamps it is designed to hold the Piece for carving . It can lay Flat and go up to almost Vertical . For me I use it for Woodburning , I can get better flow of lines without Stress on my Wrist. I find that in itself is Worth having . I bought the Clamps from Lee Valley , 3/4". Made from Cherry. Merle

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                            • #15
                              I have the Veritas carving table. It is excellent (commensurate with the cost). Though you can't stand at it (unless you are really short). It's about 35" off the floor when top is fully horizontal. Being able to rotate and tilt is such a great luxury. I think the weight posted is just for the leg kit, as you can just buy the top if you want. Altogether with top and leg kit, I think it weighs way more than 150 lbs. It's rock solid. Comes in 4 separate boxes. When not carving, it can be used as a clamping surface or assembly table. Just have to watch what you are doing if you use long holdfasts on it.

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