Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Second relief carving

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Second relief carving

    Hi everyone, started this relief carving over the weekend and have been slowly working at it when I have time. Still a long ways to go and have to clean up the fuzzies. Does anyone use a bent flat chisel to clean the bottom of the carved areas? Looking at the Hirsch micro detail 1.5mm bent chisel but its pretty expensive... Any tips are welcome!!
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
    This gallery has 2 photos.

  • #2
    You've created a wonderful relief in the Pacific NW indigenous peoples style. The use of ovoids, split U's, etc. is unique. I would argue for leaving tool marks in the low (background) areas, but it depends on the eventual use. Do you plan to use colors on portions of the design? Is this piece for yourself or a client?

    plaque1.jpg
    Last edited by pallin; 02-02-2022, 01:09 PM. Reason: added photo

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice intricate carving...well done.
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.texaswoodartist.com

      Comment


      • #4
        To answer your question first "https://hitechdiamond.com/products/flat-disc-diamond-bur" if you have a hand power carving unit, I use "Mastercarver Micro Pro"

        Secondly, what a fine job you're doing, it is going to be a striking relief that for sure.

        another plus, to me, using the flat-disks is that as your level out your different areas, you are also able to undercut the relief just a bit, might just be my imagination, but it seems to make the pop to me.
        . . .JoeB

        Comment


        • #5
          So how small is this?

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Jayson
            I sometimes use a really sharp chisel as a scraper and scrape the area clean going with the grain where one can or carve a bit of wood to the right size and shape and wrap fine grade sand paper around it and quietly sand away at it. Is time consuming but seems to work ok.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks all

              Pallin: You got it dead on! I think I might leave some tool marks in the background and would definitely like to paint it. Just a hobby piece for now. I have never sold anything yet but that might change

              Joe: I dont have any power carving tools but will look into the item you are describing. Maybe it would fit into my kit

              Nebraska: about 4 inches wide

              Glenn: Thank you sir! I did not think of carving a scrap bit of wood and wrapping with sandpaper but that will work great

              Comment


              • #8
                Got a chance to finish up this afternoon. Got a coat of tung oil on as well. Now to let it sit for a while before possibly painting (I’m not sure since I love the wood so much).

                What do you think? Traditional colours or natural?
                You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                This gallery has 3 photos.

                Comment


                • #9
                  That's a nice looking piece! There is nothing wrong with using a #2 or #3 gouge to leave a texture at the "bottom" of a carving, it's simply a choice one makes. Some carvings I make smooth as a moth's nose, some I want texture (especially so if it's a critter with hair).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    On some of the traditional painted "First Nations" carvings, some incised elements are cut into painted parts. I would suggest that you paint some major elements while leaving deeper parts as bare or stained wood. Note on the plaque I posted (above) that the rim and incised details are bare wood. The "traditional" design would have everything contained within a black formline. It's your carving, do what looks right to you.

                    PNW.jpg
                    Last edited by pallin; 02-06-2022, 10:38 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pallin View Post
                      On some of the traditional painted "First Nations" carvings, some incised elements are cut into painted parts. I would suggest that you paint some major elements while leaving deeper parts as bare or stained wood. Note on the plaque I posted (above) that the rim and incised details are bare wood. The "traditional" design would have everything contained within a black formline. It's your carving, do what looks right to you.
                      Thank you sir for the awesome guidance! I have been researching this art style but you are giving me other points to research, like ovoids and split U's. I am finding this art style and the history behind it fascinating. Planning on keeping colours fairly simple as to not take away from the carving itself. I'll be sure to post another pic once I get to that point

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Looking good, Jayson. I like the texture you put on the background. I'd paint selected parts and leave the background natural to catch the shadows...I y=think it would add an element of depth.
                        Arthur

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This turned out to be a fine project for you, something to be proud of.
                          . . .JoeB

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JasonIdz View Post

                            Thank you sir for the awesome guidance! I have been researching this art style but you are giving me other points to research, like ovoids and split U's. I am finding this art style and the history behind it fascinating. Planning on keeping colours fairly simple as to not take away from the carving itself. I'll be sure to post another pic once I get to that point
                            To get more familiar with this artform you should get a copy of Hilary Stewart's "Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast" from the University of Washington Press. In fact, if you PM* me your address, I'll mail you this copy (free). The cover illustration is the plaque above in its original form from Don Yeomans (Haida) *PM = private message (click on my username or avatar and choose "private message."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Jason, what you have done so far is Outstanding. Clean and Even Cuts are not that easy to do on Relief Carvings , but you did it . I know that Style Carving is Painted but it looks good to me the way it is . Merle

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X