Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How is the silver overlay done?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How is the silver overlay done?

    Hello all, I have a question.

    Occasionally I see a burl/briarwood cane with a silver overlay over a portion of the burly handle.

    It is fitted so well that it could have been spray-painted on, but it is (thick(!)) silver and it can go all the way around the handle, but for a few 'windows' displaying the burl grain! Shaping is always.. 'organic'.

    How is this done, please?

    An example follows;

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/18276264633...84.m1436.l2649

  • #2
    That is very curious! It appears to be copper with a silver plating applied to the copper. Do you see any seams? A wax mold could have been made of the stick and possibly a copper casting made? Then silver plated? But I would think some type of seam might still be visible, even if soldered. Unless there would be some method of casting it in place. You might get more educated guesses from someone working with metal or silver.
    'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

    http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
    http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      This is will explain it better than anything else. http://metal-artist-sculptor.blogspo...rming-and.html
      Next it was silver plated.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mpounders View Post
        That is very curious! It appears to be copper with a silver plating applied to the copper. Do you see any seams? A wax mold could have been made of the stick and possibly a copper casting made? Then silver plated? But I would think some type of seam might still be visible, even if soldered. Unless there would be some method of casting it in place. You might get more educated guesses from someone working with metal or silver.
        I have seen sterling overlay.
        I thought of the wax casting but whatever the manufacturing method, there would still need to be numerous soldering on the wood. No burns are ever visible, nor any seems!
        Considering the eccentricity of the surface texture of the burl, a simple casting couldn't be 'slipped' over.
        I thought that I was such a clever monkey, but I am flummoxed!
        It seems almost like 'pattern welded steel', a 'lost process' until 'reinvented', and we have taken it further than the ancients have dreamed.
        This is not supposed to be rocket science!
        If I can put on some silver overlays like this, in 100 years I, too, can sell them for outrageous sums on ebay!
        And I have such a nice collection of naked burl/briar sticks.
        *__-

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Dileon
          just a guess....there are silver and copper clays that can be solder or kiln fired. These clays have a high percentage of metal. The clays are super expensive....and used by jewelry makers. The wood was then cut to fit in two places....top wood piece was fitted the same way that you would a stone? The seam could be solder but how they did it without catching the wood on fire is a mystery. Also....There are resin with silver powered also used .....in jewelry making.
          The wood remains one solid piece.
          No metal clay when these were made.
          No burn/scorch marks on wood. Ever.
          The only 'mysteries' that I like are the ones that I 'choose' to let remain a mystery!
          Not this! ha!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dogcatcher View Post
            This is will explain it better than anything else. http://metal-artist-sculptor.blogspo...rming-and.html
            Next it was silver plated.
            I don't think so.
            I am a metalworker (ret) and no one forged this metal to fit so well. No one.
            And even then, it would have needed to be soldered in numerous places. Nope.
            Many have been sterling, not plated.
            I thought that one could 'electroform' the silver to the wood, but wouldn't the acids be harmful to the wood?
            And the electro-formed surfaces would need a lot of work to make it look like sheet metal.
            Another... nope.

            Comment


            • #7
              This is the description of the pic of the cane.
              A Victorian walking stick, the silver coloured metal pommel chased and repoussé decorated with scrolling foliage surrounding shield shaped vacant cartouche, malacca shaft, lacking ferrule, 91.5cm high

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dogcatcher View Post
                This is the description of the pic of the cane.
                Apples and oranges.
                Those are hollow-ware, and shaft shoved up it's hollow.
                Very different than my form fitted problem.
                Check my link.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What I think it is - thin copper - like 100% or with a metal that makes it softer. It is simply sheeted over and 'tapped' into place. Wood sticks like an orange stick - smooth and push into areas. trimmed to design and pushed into shape. Then the copper is flash plated with rub on silver.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Knowledge = experience!
                    We can keep guessing till doomsday, but there is someone, or another, who Knows!
                    We should hold a raffle to see who, if anyone, comes closest.
                    There are good arguments against all the guesses, so far.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X