Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cracking , bark or no bark

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • CW308
    replied
    Kadiddle
    I was in Tannersville for a few days , love the mountains . Have cousins in Albany, l just love the forest , finding canes to carve is a great hobby . Ticks are a problem in my area , I make sure I use the spray before going in the brush . Be Well .

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • CW308
    replied
    Bowinhand
    Thanks for the listings , l make sure every time I'm walking through a park I have my saw . Getting a nice collection , wish I knew trees better . Thanks again.

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Kadiddle
    replied
    Trees of New York field guide by Stan Tekiela. Walkabout size. I live in upstate New York. How far up do you come? Stop in and load up, cherry, oak, maple, apple, ironwood, birches and a ton of pine. Bring your loppers. Welcome to the forum.
    Carve On,
    Kadiddle

    Leave a comment:


  • bowinhand
    replied
    I found this on line thought you might like it. https://www.treeremovallongisland.or...n-long-island/

    Red maple makes great sticks. Carves and paints well. Get hard but not like rock or sugar maple.

    Leave a comment:


  • CW308
    replied
    Thanks Claude
    I plan on reading up on identifying different woods and trees , I hit the book store every other Friday. I just got into making walking sticks , my next one I'm going to try some wood burning . Thank you for sharing .

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Claude
    replied
    Here are a couple of links for you, Chris.

    Dendrology at Virginia Tech shows bark, buds, leaves etc.

    The Wood Database | The Wood Database Shows the wood and gives lots of stats about each (Janka hardness is the most important to me - describes how hard it is to carve - high numbers = hard wood)

    Claude

    Leave a comment:


  • CW308
    replied
    Thanks Ron
    I looked up the ratcheting lopper , it's going to be another tool I'll be driving around with .
    Thanks again.

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Rontana
    replied
    You might look into getting a compound bypass lopper . . . saws are good but I'm lazy.

    I use one when out looking for material (mine cuts stuff up to 2" diameter). If you've not seen them, they're just limb loppers with a ratcheting mechanism for easier use. They're pretty handy, and usually run between $30-$40.

    Leave a comment:


  • CW308
    replied
    Rontana
    I'm a country boy at heart , I'm living on LI NY. When I go upstate NY with the mountains and trees it's like I died and went to heaven . Just love the out doors . I'm going to read up on trees but in my area there isn't much to choose from . As long as it has the right shape it's mine, I even have one of those fold up saws in my car , I'm turning into a Mimi lumberjack . It's a nice hobby for me . My friends get a kick out of it and rag me , but when they see the finished product I see that spark in their eyes , hopefully the hobby doesn't spread , there's not a lot of trees on LI . Be Well

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • CW308
    replied
    Bill
    I plan on experimenting with different oils and stains , I like the natural wood grain look . Will attempt some carving and wood burning images . The last canes I carved I would burn in the park and date I cut them from , but now that I'm all out hooked it's a new ballgame to me . I'm really enjoying it . Plus I enjoy talking with you guys on my new hobby .

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Rontana
    replied
    hey Chris . . . part of the fun (to me . . . and I'm pretty new at this as well) is experimenting. Woods, finishes, just did an acrylic paint wash on one stick (acrylic mixed with water) and it turned out surprisingly nice.

    I mostly just know the trees in my area and on my place (I'm on a farm). Mostly by leaves, some by bark . . . but it's just stuff I grew up with. Put me in a different part of the country and I could only say . . . "well . . . I'm pretty sure it's a tree."

    Leave a comment:


  • woodburner807
    replied
    You are in a high level of humidity and kind of like here, and it takes forever to dry as opposed to inland areas. To dry the sticks it is best then be laying down and has adequate airflow through them.

    WW1 era rifles were finished with linseed oil and then they went to tung oil. My Dad was an antique/furniture restorer/refinisher and I've tended to replicate what he did...since he knew. However, there are many more finishes available out there and everyone has their favorite. I like about 3 coats of tung oil to give the finish some "depth."

    BTW, thanks for your military service.

    Leave a comment:


  • CW308
    replied
    Bill , I live in Nassau county LI, NY. Was originally from the city but after serving in the Army I love being with trees and grass . Now retired I got back into working with wiid . I will bring my stick out side , I will give tung oil a try also linseed oil . I have a covered deck in the back , is it best to have the sticks standing or laying down ? Thanks again Bill.

    Rontana
    Thanks for answering , how or where did you guys learn the types of wood ( trees ) I my neck of the woods I don't think there are many varieties . LI , NY. The leaves are off the trees , can you tell by the bark ? The term we used when I was in the service was FNG now I'm one of those . Sorry for all the lame guestions . I thank you all for the help . Be well .

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Rontana
    replied
    I can't add much to what's already been said, but I notice that some species seem to crack more easily than others. I've got a bunch of hackberry on my place, and while it looks cool as a stick (lots of bud bumps) it frequently seems to often crack in lengths of feet, rather than inches (it's a very wet wood). Birch and willow . . . they seem pretty stable. Eastern red cedar . . . somewhere in the middle. I have great hopes for some hedge I cut in early fall . . . but time will tell.

    I suspect much of the cracking also has to do with the climate where you live, and when you cut, so your mileage may vary. I've learned quickly to keep the sticks hanging out in the shed, and not bring them into the house or garage until they're ready. I'm generally leaving bark on until the stick is dry . . . partly because it seems to slow the cracking factor, and partly because I'm starting to like sticks with a lightly sanded bark.

    There's definitely a need for patience in terms of allowing the stuff to dry on its own terms

    Leave a comment:


  • woodburner807
    replied
    I like to finish my sticks with a few coats of tung oil and when dry (about a day) I apply Johnson's floor wax. I like the finish and have been addicted to it. Many other options but haven't found a reason to change.

    Where are you located, Chris? I was blessed to be in the AZ desert area for a while and the sticks dried faster than needed. Mesquite wood. Here along the Oregon coast, it seems like forever.

    Unless you make a kiln or make some type of dryer, no way to rush the process. BTW, sometimes "flecked" bark on sticks looks nice, especially lodgepole pine. Basically you skim off small areas of bark. and leave a "flecked" look. I've made several but prefer another style.

    Making sticks covers a broad area of knowledge and you just need to poke around and ask questions. Oak can be tough but birch is nice.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X