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Cane Handle - which grain direction ?

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  • #16
    Hi John
    Beautiful tools mate. Well done. I like the laminated rod in the snake handle. I think I would use stainless steel rod.

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    • #17
      Glenn - just wondering out loud here - - - - why stainless rod over steel or aluminum threaded rod ?
      I can understand the not rusting or corroding part. but, once fully encapsulated in epoxy, it would be airtight. is there another reason ?
      I do have a lot of 1/4" ss rod that will eventually end up as a replacement grate on my grill.
      Retired Dimensional Graphics Artist (a/k/a Sign Carver)

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Eddy-Smiles View Post

        Now I like that idea! That method allows for just about any design you could come up with. And it's just about got to be bullet proof. In construction the building codes allow steel dowels to be epoxied into existing concrete so if it's sturdy enough to meet the NBC it ought to be good enough for the reinforcement of a wood handle.
        Just a thought to ponder: I was told that in order for a strong cane on this snake you need to use fruit tree branch that has this kind curve ...not easy to find but doable. I was begging for years to cut a neighbors branch of a guava tree that had the perfect curve meaning the grain fit the movement of the work. I have seen them cut cobra snake canes using rather large curved branches using this method. Although I must say I have yet to try this method out.
        . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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        • #19
          well - the handle is done. I went with the threaded rod as pictured. the initial plan was for the 1/2" aluminum rod but when I got it out of my shed, it was actually 5/8", so that was a no-go. with a little testing, I am very confident in the common steel 1/4" threaded rod - a gorilla will not be able to break the handle in any direction. so that part is done. the rough-out carving starts this afternoon.
          photos will be posted in a separate "build thread" to keep everything together.
          thanks to all for your invaluable suggestions and kind words.
          John

          Edit: here is a teaser shot of how the project will go: (M&T joint for the shaft just below the rod).

          DSCF9093.jpg
          John Smith
          Retired Craftsman
          Last edited by John Smith; 11-09-2021, 10:55 AM.
          Retired Dimensional Graphics Artist (a/k/a Sign Carver)

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          • #20
            I agree, your 1/4" rod should be find for stengthening the handle. You may have your own thoughts I am just sharing. For connecting a cane handle to the shaft I use a 5/16th threaded rod. I drill a 19/64th hole in the handle and shaft. The small differents in the size of the hole let me thread the rod in to the wood holding ferm and giving a better hold with the epoxy. Also with the higher handles I go 3" to 4"in to the staff. less chance fo tearout with the leverage a taller handle can have.
            We live in the land of the free because of the brave!
            https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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            • #21
              Randy - I will be using both M&T and 5/16" threaded rod for the joint.
              I forgot I had a root in my shed that came from an old live oak tree that is the perfect size and shape for the shaft. (nice and wiggly). it has been curing for over 3 years - so it's good to go.
              thanks !!
              Retired Dimensional Graphics Artist (a/k/a Sign Carver)

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              • #22
                MetalHead Mallet a few years ago because I thought it looked cool. then another, and another and ........ Those are darn good-looking mallets. I love these mallets do to the fact I use them on knives and palm tools...because of extreme arthritis and limited thumb movement my grip is bad...but the light touch of mallet is great for pushing tools. If you ever decide to sell a few let me know....one of my favorite mallets.
                . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                • #23
                  Dileon - I have sold many of them that are not in the photo on E-Bay over the years.
                  I will send you a PM tomorrow with a photo of what I have left.
                  I also have several raw heads on hand in aluminum and brass in different sizes that can be custom made to the user's specs.
                  the style of metalhead for light hand carving is this one. it is not "swung" like a hefty carving mallet. but, held in the palm with gentle tap tap taps and it is indeed a relief for sore joints. (this is the only copper one I've made - it is just too hard for my old HF lathe to handle - so I stick with brass and aluminum. thanks for your interest !!!

                  Copper Tapper.jpg
                  Retired Dimensional Graphics Artist (a/k/a Sign Carver)

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                  • #24
                    Nice looking mallet, John!

                    Claude
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                    • #25
                      Hi John
                      stainless just takes any moisture issues right out of the equation. It does have a 34% higher expansion rate then mild steel but at 1.34mm per meter length at 82 deg C it isn't a major concern one way or the other.

                      Just to give you some idea of the issues that can come about (In the event you're not aware of it and you might well be)
                      Muzzle loader rifles that were made without slots for the barrel lockdown pins to move in with seasonal changes in expansion due to heat in both the metal and the wood had been known to split the the wood under the barrels around the pins. When I made my flintlocks I allowed about an 1/8 of an inch each side of the lockdown pin for movement so that the barrel floats in the wood section. no problem at all.

                      With the amount of work it is going to take to do a snake head cane I might suggest a 1/8 inch piece of polystyrene at each end of the steel rod. The glue won't get into is and it will easily compress with expansion so no strain goes on the wood.

                      Probably a massive overkill but again it just elliminates a potential problem no matter how remote.

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