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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    A few things to keep in mind:

    1.It's hard (but not impossible) to make small carvings with large tools;

    2. You can make the bottoms of your design smoother appearing by using a flat punch to mash down wood fibers, but a series of sharp indentations will tend to fill with the finishing stain and be less ragged looking...experiment on scrap... if you can't smooth an area to your satisfaction, use texture to make it part of your design;

    3. For the ragged edges on the raised design, try rounding over the edges of the weaves...making them more cord-like in shape... rather than leaving the edges squared off...this will also allow you to more easily access the bottom cavities to clean them up.

    Hope this helps.

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  • Donsexton
    replied
    That looks to me like a job for a small skew and or hook skew, you know what the pros use to do pattern type relief carving. Celtic knots and such not my thing but I have watched it done

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  • DLarabee
    replied
    Musok, Welcome to our passion! Good on you for starting out with a knot pattern (whether you go with Celtic or another source, the knot patterns exist in every culture and have often similar meanings and expressions.) I love doing the knot patterns myself and always have at least one knot project in the works for "fiddling around". I feel like they are really great for learning the movements, learning about the tools and skills, and helping my mind immerse into the art.

    First off, I didn't get a clear read on whether you are extremely happy with the Flexcut knives or not, but please don't hesitate to try other brands. I have learned the frustration in this art comes from one of three sources, and you need to be able to identify which one is the cause.
    1. You and your skills
    2. Your tools (wrong kind, or not sharp enough)
    3. The wood you are using (wrong kind or just a poor quality, even basswood can be a pain if it's too dry which many "cheap" pieces are.)

    Until you have worked on a variety of woods with a variety of tools and have done a lot of projects, you may be unable to 'whittle down' the source of the issue. Don't be afraid to get different brands of tools. None of the great master carvers that I've seen out there have all one brand or type of gouges. Even folks that make their own often have a few other people's knives in regular use.

    For this particular piece, I do believe that you will find a tool to help solve your issues with the sides. a 1/4e Pfeil looks like the answer to me, and you'll find an equivalent in other brands. I also agree that 'piercing' the work would help, too. If the design is pierced, you may still be able to mount it atop a box or urn after both pieces are finished. That would allow you to use thin strips of sandpaper to file the edges of your cuts inside the weave.

    Without piercing, there is one other possibility for flattening those bottoms. If you have a flat blade that is the same width as the opening, you can scrape the bottom across the grain. This is NOT recommended and will dull the edge of your chisel slightly. You can strop it back up, but don't try to carve other things until you do. I have one chisel that I do this with, but don't use it for other things.This is a bit of burnishing and can get those bottoms flat. Be ready to cut into the edges slightly to loosen the bottom pieces.

    Let us know if you try it and what you think. I hope that I've helped.

    Diana

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  • lionslair
    replied
    Maybe a scrop? or a loop looking side cutting in small size. Small might mean you make one after looking at a larger size. Maybe a tool man or machinist. I have seen 7 shaped cutters as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • pallin
    replied
    There is probably an "affinity group" for people who collect or make boxes. I have a cousin who makes "Heirloom Boxes" of exotic woods, often making the hinges and latches out of wood. The photo below is one such box with ironwood inlays in the top. Often there are interesting stories connected to the boxes. For example, the first photo in my recent message was a box that started as a monogrammed hanky box. The monogram was no longer correct, so I carved it off and replaced the letters with leaves. The second was a "vanity case" painted green. It was the right length for my carving gouges and made of butternut, so I stripped off the paint and carved the design (from Wayne Barton). The third photo was a box my son had made in a 7th grade woodshop class. The box is pine, with a redwood top - nice for trying a new design. It is now my wife's carving toolbox.

    154.jpg002.JPG

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  • musok
    replied
    Originally posted by pallin View Post
    Box lids offer many variations for carving. Here are some examples from my own experience: (None pierced)

    leafbox.jpgboxlid.jpgredwood.jpg
    Bloody hell, those are amazing. I hope I can create pieces like that one day! I'm definitely willing to put the hours in.
    Such beautiful work!

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  • pallin
    replied
    Box lids offer many variations for carving. Here are some examples from my own experience: (None pierced)

    leafbox.jpgboxlid.jpgredwood.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • musok
    replied
    Originally posted by pallin View Post
    Musok - Your latest photo shows you have a good understanding of the "weave." One solution to your "ragged square problem" would be to cut them all the way through the wood - to make a pierced carving. LOL That may not be suitable for a box lid. It's becoming a good learning experience.
    Ooo, I like the idea of punching the squares! It woul only work for a box that didn't need to hold anything securely or privately. As morbid as it may sound, my motivation for carving lids is to make caskets for cremated pets. Not really good for holes. Lol. But as a creative pursuit it's a brilliant idea.

    I've always been creative, so carving has always been something I've been interesting in and I planned to do wood turning but don't have the room for that kit, I currently paper cut, and will carve other things but, I want to get good at the lids for that sole purpose.

    Leave a comment:


  • musok
    replied
    Originally posted by honketyhank View Post
    musok, I think that's a great first 'stab' at relief carving. That is an art I have not tried, so I have no advice except to say that there are some great people-resources here. Welcome to the forum.
    Aw, thank you, and thanks for welcoming me to the forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • pallin
    replied
    Musok - Your latest photo shows you have a good understanding of the "weave." One solution to your "ragged square problem" would be to cut them all the way through the wood - to make a pierced carving. LOL That may not be suitable for a box lid. It's becoming a good learning experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • honketyhank
    replied
    musok, I think that's a great first 'stab' at relief carving. That is an art I have not tried, so I have no advice except to say that there are some great people-resources here. Welcome to the forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • musok
    replied
    Originally posted by pallin View Post
    These patterns of crossing bands exist in various cultures. They may be called knots or basket weaves or something else, but when used in carving the crossings are usually emphasized by making one band appear to go over (or under) the other. This is done by stop cuts marking the edges of the upper band where it crossed another band, then shaving the lower band down to those stop cuts. In most of these designs the bands alternate from crossing above to below, so the shaving of the bands curves from the high point of cross to the low point where it meets the stop cut.
    Ive not been able to get to the carving shop, I'll be going tomorrow, but thanks for informing me about the weaves, I hadn't thought about that or how to do it, but I have had a go in the last half hour and it's now updated to the following pic.
    I feel I should have done the weave before fully trying to gouge the recessed squares or define edges. It really cleared the space and highlighted how shoddy my lines are.
    Onward and upward, more so when I get the right tools for the stop cut and smaller chisels than I already have.
    Thanks for the tips on technique.

    Leave a comment:


  • pallin
    replied
    These patterns of crossing bands exist in various cultures. They may be called knots or basket weaves or something else, but when used in carving the crossings are usually emphasized by making one band appear to go over (or under) the other. This is done by stop cuts marking the edges of the upper band where it crossed another band, then shaving the lower band down to those stop cuts. In most of these designs the bands alternate from crossing above to below, so the shaving of the bands curves from the high point of cross to the low point where it meets the stop cut.

    Leave a comment:


  • musok
    replied
    Originally posted by pallin View Post
    Now that you've had all this discussion on how to clean up the squares, it looks to me like you should first finish the design. The carving is a Celtic design in which the lines go over and under at each crossing. You should first establish that over & under shaping before you trim up the corners and edges of the squares.
    Hi Pallin, it's not a Celtic pattern, it's a Buddhist eternal knot. I hadn't really figured out how to make that happen. Lol. But I'm going to research and watch as many videos as possible.
    Thanks again for everyone's help.

    Leave a comment:


  • pallin
    replied
    Now that you've had all this discussion on how to clean up the squares, it looks to me like you should first finish the design. The carving is a Celtic design in which the lines go over and under at each crossing. You should first establish that over & under shaping before you trim up the corners and edges of the squares.

    Leave a comment:

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