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Drawing what is to be carved

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  • kiri
    started a topic Drawing what is to be carved

    Drawing what is to be carved

    Just wondering if drawing sketching on paper, what I will be carving would help me improving my carving skills.

  • cut up
    replied
    One of my last carvings was a man setting on a stump. I Found pictures of people setting on benches and chairs in different poses. All on the internet. I used some of those pictures to help me with the drawings that I felt like I needed for the carving. Then I traced it onto the wood.

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    We all got our ideas as to what helps in carving beside a sharp knife, but as was setting here carving (mostly busts type) I got to thinking about the time I've to spend studying the bone structure of the head. We are of course not carving the bone structure bu the skin covering it, and sure doesn't hurt to know a little about the bone structure-----just thought I would throw this into the mix

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  • kiri
    replied
    Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

    I think Di nailed it!
    I think so too.

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    Originally posted by Dileon View Post
    You do not have to be a pro to draw. We got tracing papers, we have the computers, we have printers that we can trace an outline and we have measure equipment to find out just the correct placement. Tons of information on the net. People use color book pages on the internet or illustrations drawing on the net. Then, you can add or subtract what you like and do not like. Sometimes I do not try and my sketches look like second-grade work as I am thinking out ideas... I even do stick figures. You would never know by looking at them I have eight years of fine art drawing classes.....but who cares how good you are? Thing is to get ideas. Figure out placement of things. Also drawing is good for details if you practice, you will get better.
    I think Di nailed it!

    Leave a comment:


  • Dileon
    replied
    You do not have to be a pro to draw. We got tracing papers, we have the computers, we have printers that we can trace an outline and we have measure equipment to find out just the correct placement. Tons of information on the net. People use color book pages on the internet or illustrations drawing on the net. Then, you can add or subtract what you like and do not like. Sometimes I do not try and my sketches look like second-grade work as I am thinking out ideas... I even do stick figures. You would never know by looking at them I have eight years of fine art drawing classes.....but who cares how good you are? Thing is to get ideas. Figure out placement of things. Also drawing is good for details if you practice, you will get better.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    I like to draw what I plan to carve to get the proportions right. I erase nothing.
    Instead, I make changes in different colors (red, green, purple, orange) so that I can compare them all.
    I use my balcony glass door for tracing drawings. Almost everything is done on 11" x 17" paper.

    I was allowed to go through a Haida carver's sketch books!
    He explained how to draw half, fold it, to get the left/right symmetry correct.
    How to stretch the shapes for the size of the material ( solid silver cuff, etc)

    My wood has to be smooth enough to trace the drawings with graphite paper = not greasy like carbon paper.
    I cut out templates of shapes to be drawn over and over again.

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  • Bob K.
    replied
    Even if your drawing skills are poor, it can't hurt to try...and the more you work at it the better you will get. Look at it this way...your carving will turn out no worse if you first draw a sketch than if you don't.

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  • Just Carving
    replied
    By drawing on paper, it will help to improve your drawing skills. i.e. practice makes perfect. So, at some point you may be able to sketch what you want to carve directly onto the wood. But sketching on paper will help you work out the uncertainties and give you a chance to practice the sketch before drawing on the wood. One other point, you can always make a copy of your paper sketch and trace it onto the wood using graphite paper, or just cut out the sketch and glue it onto the wood and carve it away. Another alternative is to glue the copy of the sketch onto cardboard like cereal box cardboard and then cut out the outline. The template helps to position the pattern on the wood and gives you some references to start with when drawing on the wood. You can also reuse the template if you carve repeat pieces.

    Bob L

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  • kiri
    replied
    I used to just carve with rough about what to carve or faint images of something I want to carve.
    And then they would turn out something totally different from what I tried carve.

    I was thinking about how to overcome this problem, and maybe trying to draw what is to be carved before starting carving would help?
    But as pointed out, my drawing skill is poor, so it could be problem.

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  • jderijcke
    replied
    Hi

    till a few years ago drawing lessons were part of woodcarving education and training here in Europe. It helped to get insight in the forms and proportions of design, ornaments and architetural structure. You can compare it perhaps with making first a clay model of what you will be carving.
    Now in Belgium it isn't anymore (timeconsuming) but they are deleting even the woodcarving education. Students (in secundary school, technical and professioanl formation) are only trained in working with machinery (sheets of plywood, MDF) and functional woodworking (roof and construction). Sad! Lucky that there are still good formations in academies, but without drawing, and in evening class for hobbyists or workshops with some private woodcarvers and of course in France, England ...
    Jos

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    There those among us who can just make the chips fly and end up with a great carving. But what has been said about drawing out your carvings can only help, without doing it I would consider my self a whittler, not a carver, ending up with a bunch of chips and marshmallow roasting stick, it will help organize your work. Speaking for my self, even after drawing out what I'm going to be carving and making a pattern, my carving is close at best.

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  • Dileon
    replied
    I find drawing major helps my carving, Although most of the time I do not, .....it is time-consuming and I am lazy. But if I need a good carving it must be planned out.

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  • Steve Reed
    replied
    Let me add my $.02 here. Drawing on paper can definitely help organize your thoughts about what you're going to do. Once you have a basic idea, then you can draw on the wood. Also, dividers can help you determine if things are in proportion, such as eyes, layout of a face etc. Keep at it, the more you practice the better you will become!
    Steve

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  • woodburner807
    replied
    Most of the drawing done, I use a compass, dividers, ruler, etc. You don't need much of a drawing talent...in my experience. Oh, a French curve helps also.
    Last edited by woodburner807; 10-07-2018, 10:02 PM. Reason: missing word

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