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  • Brian T
    replied
    I'm storing images as as My Pictures (MS).
    LC to open with Picture Manager lets me do some editing, cropping & resizing.
    Save with a different name and they fit right in here. "Internet Large Presize" 640x480 works every time.

    SweepsA.JPG

    Leave a comment:


  • woodburner807
    replied
    Originally posted by JKill View Post

    I'd love to see how your carving turns out!

    I started a hillbilly following Doug and after 4 hours I barely have the feet shaped out. going to put that one on hold for a little bit I think and take on a few smaller, more simple projects to start with. i'm open to suggestions if anyone has any?

    ive tried the 5 minute wizard and 5 minue owl carvings with decent success, as well as one of Sharonmyarts little people. i'll try to figure out how to get a picture of it under 2mb so i can upload it.
    I usually make a bunch of carvings and then take pictures...more interested in the carving aspect.

    Doug's rendition of the wizard he calls something like "The Most fantastical Carving," or a similar name. In the back of him, he shows a bunch of modifications to the wizard and think he shows some of his adaptations. I also adapted the basic carving to make sea captains, etc. Also, Doug has a great tutorial on making bears which are easy and fun to do.

    Seems you have to do many carvings in order to develop an approach that you like...at least for me. I started out with some of Sharon's little people but her technique was too detailed to fit my needs.

    Stick with it JKill and you will discover what you enjoy best.

    You can make the image a medium JPEG for size compression...if you have a decent graphics program. GIMP is a bit complicated but free. Also others out there.

    Leave a comment:


  • JKill
    replied
    Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post

    I'm currently doing a few "Native in a Blanket," and find it takes a few tries to nail it down. Really like them and have done several of the "hillbilly" carvings which are a lot of fun. Mike Shipley has several good books and one is "Whittling Country Folks," and it has a character in it that he carved...which is the basis for Doug's character. All his books are great and easy. BTW, Mike Shipley is/was the originator of the OCC carving knives.
    I'd love to see how your carving turns out!

    I started a hillbilly following Doug and after 4 hours I barely have the feet shaped out. going to put that one on hold for a little bit I think and take on a few smaller, more simple projects to start with. i'm open to suggestions if anyone has any?

    ive tried the 5 minute wizard and 5 minue owl carvings with decent success, as well as one of Sharonmyarts little people. i'll try to figure out how to get a picture of it under 2mb so i can upload it.

    Leave a comment:


  • woodburner807
    replied
    Originally posted by JKill View Post

    I might try another one of sharonmyarts little people today with the new mora, If I do i'll report back on how it handled,

    10-4 on the carving glove, its already saved my fingers a couple times! haha

    I agree on Dougs videos, I enjoy his the most - I really love his "native in a blanket" and "hillbilly" carvings he does. definitely something i'm going to strive for in future carving projects. i've tried 2 carvings now with out using patterns and just shaping the wood. Neither of those went well haha- for now I think i need the guidence of a pattern. even though i'm sure there is parts to them I dont understand/ am not reading correctly.

    thanks again for the reply!
    I'm currently doing a few "Native in a Blanket," and find it takes a few tries to nail it down. Really like them and have done several of the "hillbilly" carvings which are a lot of fun. Mike Shipley has several good books and one is "Whittling Country Folks," and it has a character in it that he carved...which is the basis for Doug's character. All his books are great and easy. BTW, Mike Shipley is/was the originator of the OCC carving knives.

    Leave a comment:


  • JKill
    replied
    Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post
    I don't recall if Doug ever mentioned a source for pine...your stores/sources might be different than here in the US. Heck, even most of the hardware store's wood comes from western Canada anyway.

    I have a Mora and it is certainly sharp but found it too big for the carving I do. Doug actually started out with one a few years ago, You might just ask in the comment section for his videos on Youtube.

    Make sure you at least use a carving glove and thumb/finger guards. Doug doesn't and has had some nasty injuries and suggests all wear a carving glove but he doesn't. The glove helps protect you from blisters, as well as cuts. Not 100 percent but has saved me on many occasions and does help to hold the workpiece.

    BTW, I find Doug has the best tutorials out there and explains things well without patterns, doesn't use a saw, and creates interesting characters. Gene is fine but doesn't usually use patterns. Sharonmyart is great but she only covers one type of character which gets a little boring after a while. If you do like those small characters then there is Jack Price CD's out there with a great variety. It looks like that is where Sharon got her knowledge from.

    For knife sharpening, I use oil stones and work my way up to a black Arkansas for the final sharpening...then my file folders for honing. Many people say to hone every 20 minutes or more frequent, but after a while, you can tell when a knife needs honing by the way it cuts.

    Lots to learn but the sharpening is as important as the carving. Doug also has a video on that but uses a belt machine...I don't.
    I might try another one of sharonmyarts little people today with the new mora, If I do i'll report back on how it handled,

    10-4 on the carving glove, its already saved my fingers a couple times! haha

    I agree on Dougs videos, I enjoy his the most - I really love his "native in a blanket" and "hillbilly" carvings he does. definitely something i'm going to strive for in future carving projects. i've tried 2 carvings now with out using patterns and just shaping the wood. Neither of those went well haha- for now I think i need the guidence of a pattern. even though i'm sure there is parts to them I dont understand/ am not reading correctly.

    thanks again for the reply!

    Leave a comment:


  • JKill
    replied
    Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post
    Not sure you have seen this, but Gene has a Youtube video on a review of Beaver Craft knives: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezR8TGPKt-I
    Hi Woodburner807! I havent seen this video. Thanks so much for linking the video, I havent seen it and Gene gives an indepth review.

    thanks! worth the watch for sure

    Leave a comment:


  • woodburner807
    replied
    Not sure you have seen this, but Gene has a Youtube video on a review of Beaver Craft knives: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezR8TGPKt-I

    Leave a comment:


  • woodburner807
    replied
    Also, Arleen "carversWoodShop" has a lot of tutorials and here is a list: https://blog.mischel.com/arlene-carv...arving-videos/

    Leave a comment:


  • woodburner807
    replied
    Here is a list of Doug's videos, not sure it covers all: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...XLbgFxGfPH7tHW

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  • woodburner807
    replied
    I don't recall if Doug ever mentioned a source for pine...your stores/sources might be different than here in the US. Heck, even most of the hardware store's wood comes from western Canada anyway.

    I have a Mora and it is certainly sharp but found it too big for the carving I do. Doug actually started out with one a few years ago, You might just ask in the comment section for his videos on Youtube.

    Make sure you at least use a carving glove and thumb/finger guards. Doug doesn't and has had some nasty injuries and suggests all wear a carving glove but he doesn't. The glove helps protect you from blisters, as well as cuts. Not 100 percent but has saved me on many occasions and does help to hold the workpiece.

    BTW, I find Doug has the best tutorials out there and explains things well without patterns, doesn't use a saw, and creates interesting characters. Gene is fine but doesn't usually use patterns. Sharonmyart is great but she only covers one type of character which gets a little boring after a while. If you do like those small characters then there is Jack Price CD's out there with a great variety. It looks like that is where Sharon got her knowledge from.

    For knife sharpening, I use oil stones and work my way up to a black Arkansas for the final sharpening...then my file folders for honing. Many people say to hone every 20 minutes or more frequent, but after a while, you can tell when a knife needs honing by the way it cuts.

    Lots to learn but the sharpening is as important as the carving. Doug also has a video on that but uses a belt machine...I don't.
    Last edited by woodburner807; 07-06-2019, 07:53 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JKill
    replied
    Originally posted by Claude View Post

    Pine from the DIY stores would be lousy for carving. I've heard that sugar pine from the left coast is good, but haven't tried it. There are quite a few Canadian carvers on here, so hopefully one of them will offer you some sources of Northern basswood. One source is to look for local timber mills. Another would be a local hardwood retailer. If you can find a couple of local timber mills, go out and talk to them and see what they can do for you. You might be able to get some of their cut-off scraps for next to nothing.

    I agree with mpounders about the 600/1000 grit. You could likely save some money by going to the local auto parts store and getting some sandpaper in the appropriate grits. Glue or tape it down to a flat surface (12 inch tile, piece of glass, some MDF shelving, etc.) and use this to reshape or correct a dinged edge. Google "scary sharp". Then strop on cardboard to get it "carving sharp"

    I'm another who had to work at it for a while before I figured out to correctly sharpen my knives.

    Oh - I also have used a belt sander to take care of a chipped gouge edge. Mike's right about dipping in water - if the edge turns blue, you just lost the temper in it. I touch my gouge to the belt sander and count to five as I rotate the gouge, then dip into a container of water. I ruined the edge on a Swiss Made gouge by leaving it on the belt too long... Took me a couple of hours to grind off the blued area...

    Claude
    Hi Claude! thanks for the reply!

    Lumber mills eh? I live near a MASSIVE lumber mill. Tembec, Allthough that is In Quebec not Ontario. I am very close to Quebec though. thats a great hint and something i definetly have not thought of. I'll for sure check that out, I know a couple of the guys that work there, so Hopefully I can get a hookup.

    Doug Linker, famous youtuber, is not very far from where I live and says white pine can be an excellent source for carving. I will have to check it out and report back.

    great news about the 600/1000 Sharpening stones, I ordered them today! I am very excited to start learning to sharpen properly!

    I dont have access to a belt sander, but good to know about the water/blue/temper, i will Definetly keep that in mind.

    Thanks so much for your reply Claude, hope your having a great weekend.

    Leave a comment:


  • JKill
    replied
    Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post
    Welcome Jkill and this is an excellent carving forum...as you can tell. BeaverCraft is actually a Ukraine company and they are getting US distributors...including Amazon. I have one of their bowl carving knives and they seem OK. Everyone has to select a knife they like and there is a blizzard of opinions out there. I have Flextcut, Murphy, and others but I've settled on the OCC which is also what Doug Linker uses. Gene Messer has also used his OCC with great reviews. I now use the OCC almost for everything. It holds an edge well, is easy to sharpen, and keeps an edge a long time...in basswood.

    I'm told white pine is an excellent wood to carve and not sure what type of pine Doug suggested...he is in Canada (Ontario). I've noticed he uses basswood and an OCC now for all his carvings. Why switch horses when what you have works so well. My OCC is 1.5 inches from tip to end and I like it so much I bought another as a backup.

    Welcome, search the forum, post your questions and you will get thoughtful answers, although not the same ones every time. Oh, ditto on Heinecke...
    Thanks for the reply Woodburner807!

    Yea for $70 for 3 knives I got the kind of quality that was expected. not great but I think half decent for someone just starting out.

    I havent used the Mora 122 I picked up just yet as my hands still have a few blisters and muscles are actually pretty sore from spending most of the day carving last week. I'll have to report back on how that knife is. At first glance it seems nice and is much better quality than the beavercraft items.

    I was leaning toward Flexcut but went with a Mora as i've had a few of the camping knives in the past and was impressed with them. hopefully this carving model works out okay. I have a feeling I will probably end up getting a Flexcut at somepoint as well.

    I just checked out the OCC website and turns out there is 4 dealers in Ontario which is great(thats where I am) so that might be somethihng for the future as well.

    I'm going to watch a bunch more of Dougs videos and see if I can figure out where he gets his white pine, i'm pretty sure he said just a 2x4 if white pine from home depot. If I find anything definitive I will be sure to report back.

    Thank again so much for the reply and hope your having a great weekend.

    Leave a comment:


  • JKill
    replied
    Originally posted by mpounders View Post
    Get the 600/1000. But you generally only use a stone or anything more abrasive than a strop when you have damaged an edge or you are trying to reshape it. Then it is a matter of preference of what you use. I use a belt sander to get the angles on some new tools lowered down where they will carve, being careful to cool the tool frequently in water. But I know the edges on the BeaverCraft tools would need quite a bit of work to get them cutting good. The same for most Mora knives that I have seen. Their initial edges are more designed for camp work and occasional carving of green wood than actual carving. The edges will have dual bevels and the angle is steeper, meaning it will keep it's edge for a long time and is not likely to chip or break in rough work. That's fine if that is your intended purpose, but it can make if frustrating to carve with, since it is not really sharp enough for that. I never realized how dull my knives were until I bought my first sharp carving knife. It took me a couple of years to learn how to properly sharpen my tools, but I know others that have never quite gotten the hang of it. But you can always send them off to be sharpened, as many places selling carving tools offer a sharpening service. I highly recommend Helvie knives, Drake, and Pfeil tools. It can be frustrating and dangerous carving with dull tools, but it can be difficult to know what you are working toward if you have never owned a sharp tool.

    10-4 Mpounders! thanks for the reply! I ordered a 600/1000 stone, and along with the leather strop hopefully I can get my beaver craft back to working order! I'm sure i'll have another thread posted about that once I recieve the stones.

    The Mora I bought was a Mora 122 and is supposed to be made for carving. I took a closer look at the blade in the sunlight and it looks like there is to bevels for sure. I'll post a picutre once i figure out how to take pictures that are under 2 megs.

    Thanks so much again for the reply, Appreciate the time you took!

    Hope you are having a great weekend.

    Leave a comment:


  • Claude
    replied
    Originally posted by JKill View Post

    Thanks for the Reply Claude! ordered my basswood online, it came from Beavercreek. I cant tell from looking at it if its northern or southern. I'll defintly look around for the softer stuff.

    how is Pine for carving? The bass wood is nice, but 15$ for 8 little 1x4 inch sticks is a little steep $$$

    Doug Linker on Youtube suggested a 2x4 if pine from the store would be fine?

    got the knife back to a 17 degree edge for now, looking at new sharpeners/stones right now

    thanks again for the reply!
    Pine from the DIY stores would be lousy for carving. I've heard that sugar pine from the left coast is good, but haven't tried it. There are quite a few Canadian carvers on here, so hopefully one of them will offer you some sources of Northern basswood. One source is to look for local timber mills. Another would be a local hardwood retailer. If you can find a couple of local timber mills, go out and talk to them and see what they can do for you. You might be able to get some of their cut-off scraps for next to nothing.

    I agree with mpounders about the 600/1000 grit. You could likely save some money by going to the local auto parts store and getting some sandpaper in the appropriate grits. Glue or tape it down to a flat surface (12 inch tile, piece of glass, some MDF shelving, etc.) and use this to reshape or correct a dinged edge. Google "scary sharp". Then strop on cardboard to get it "carving sharp"

    I'm another who had to work at it for a while before I figured out to correctly sharpen my knives.

    Oh - I also have used a belt sander to take care of a chipped gouge edge. Mike's right about dipping in water - if the edge turns blue, you just lost the temper in it. I touch my gouge to the belt sander and count to five as I rotate the gouge, then dip into a container of water. I ruined the edge on a Swiss Made gouge by leaving it on the belt too long... Took me a couple of hours to grind off the blued area...

    Claude

    Leave a comment:


  • woodburner807
    replied
    Oh, I use a file folder cut to size, add Felxcut Gold and that is my stroping approach. I think Randy suggested a tad of oil on the sharpening compound...help a lot. Again, everyone has their own approach and just use what works for you.

    Leave a comment:

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