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  • #16
    First and foremost, don't get upset about it, it is fixable. Beginners can get turned off carving because of poorly sharpened blades. You have some great experience offering advice here, so follow it. The easy way is to return the knife as defective, but this could also be a great learning experience for you. You will have to learn to sharpen eventually, an essential skill for a carver. Either by using stones to repair, sandpaper, or a power sharpener, you must learn to sharpen and to strop. Follow the advice regarding identifying the nick and to repair it. Best of luck.

    Bob
    Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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    • #17
      I agree with the advice about sharpening it. Shipping the knife back to the seller, waiting for it get fixed, then shipping back to you will cost some money and quite a bit of time. I have had knife blades and gouges both make the little "scratch" in the wood. One of the best ways to see where it is, is use a magic marker, strop it a couple of strokes, then use magnification to look at the edge. You likely have a chip out of the edge. If the scratch is small (under magnification). some wet/dry sandpaper in a 1000-2000 grit range should take care of it. Put the sandpaper on a flat surface - preferable a piece of glass, and use your normal stropping motion for 10 strokes on each side. Cut on the end grain of some basswood and see if the scratch is gone. If not, do another 10 strokes, etc. When it's gone, switch to your strop and strop it until it leaves a shiny surface on the end grain of the wood and no scratch. Sometimes it's difficult to find fine sandpaper at the DIY store; look at your local auto parts store - they sell the very fine sandpaper to rub out paint on a car...

      It may take some time on the stropping to get the sanding scratches out of the blade. The 0.5 micron compound most of us use is around 45,000 grit... https://www.bestsharpeningstones.com...n%20Calculator
      Claude
      Last edited by Claude; 01-20-2020, 08:26 PM.
      My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

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      • #18
        First of all thanks for all of your helpful replies! I appreciate all the advice and encouragement. I really wanted to try to fix this myself if I could because, as many of you pointed out, I'm going to need to be able to do so at some point. I'm happy to say that I successfully got the nick out tonight and the knife is cutting magnificently! I'll add some more detail below.

        First, I was able to find the nick relatively quickly based on the advice here and could feel it on my fingernail even though I still couldn't really see it. It then took me a while to hunt down some high grit sandpaper. I finally ordered a pack of 3M paper on Amazon ranging from 1000 to 2500 grit. I started with 2000 grit paper on a piece of glass (that picture frame didnt really need that glass anyway). Unfortunately, after a few dozen swipes the nick was still there. I moved to the 1000 grit paper and had the same result. I almost quit as I didnt have anything else on hand higher than 400 which seemed too low. But rather than give up I thought maybe I'd give my 1200 grit diamond stone just a few swipes to see if it would help. After running both sides across 3 times I could tell it was better. I kept trying a few more at a time and about a dozen swipes on each side did the trick - the nick was gone. I followed this up with a 10 to 1 countdown series on 1500 paper, then 2500, then my strop and then my other strop for good measure. Now I'm getting glassy smooth cuts across the grain no matter which part of the blade I'm using. It's so sharp I realized a couple of my other blades I thought were sharp could probably use some attention.

        So this does create some additional questions for me. First, why would a 1200 grit diamond stone work when 1000 grit paper did not? Is it the case that if I had just spent more time on the 1000 grit paper that the nick would've come off eventually? I felt like I was taking a risk because the diamond stone feels rougher than the paper and I was afraid of damaging the knife. Did I just get lucky and this is maybe not something to make a habit of? At the end of the day I figured I just need to learn by trying and I was more curious than anything about what would happen. I'm glad it worked and I'm glad I had the higher grit paper to finish the process. Thanks again for all the responses and I'm sure I'll be back with more questions in the future.

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        • #19
          Two things
          1. The density of grit grains per square inch. You get more happening with more grit.
          Cheap paper has cheap adhesive and the sandpaper wears out more quickly.

          2. The diamond grains have sharper corners than the silicon carbide grains on the sand paper.
          So they probably cut faster.

          Reads like you have learned a lot. The sharpening thing sems to be half the battle.

          I buy packs of 3M sandpapers from 400 to 1500 from Lee Valley.
          Last essential step for me is to hone with chrome green.
          Brian T

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          • #20
            Glad you were able to get it worked out. I tell my students that is you see a scratch, it's time to strop. One quick bit of advice, be careful with diamonds, they cut aggressively! Remember if you're "sharpening", you're losing metal. Strop, strop and strop again! Be patient and you'll get there. Don't get in a hurry, you can ruin an expensive knife quickly!
            Steve
            Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
            My FB page:https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...7196480&type=3

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            • #21
              Hum sounds like a reason for more knives

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Claude View Post
                I agree with the advice about sharpening it. Shipping the knife back to the seller, waiting for it get fixed, then shipping back to you will cost some money and quite a bit of time. I have had knife blades and gouges both make the little "scratch" in the wood. One of the best ways to see where it is, is use a magic marker, strop it a couple of strokes, then use magnification to look at the edge. You likely have a chip out of the edge. If the scratch is small (under magnification). some wet/dry sandpaper in a 1000-2000 grit range should take care of it. Put the sandpaper on a flat surface - preferable a piece of glass, and use your normal stropping motion for 10 strokes on each side. Cut on the end grain of some basswood and see if the scratch is gone. If not, do another 10 strokes, etc. When it's gone, switch to your strop and strop it until it leaves a shiny surface on the end grain of the wood and no scratch. Sometimes it's difficult to find fine sandpaper at the DIY store; look at your local auto parts store - they sell the very fine sandpaper to rub out paint on a car...

                It may take some time on the stropping to get the sanding scratches out of the blade. The 0.5 micron compound most of us use is around 45,000 grit... https://www.bestsharpeningstones.com...n%20Calculator
                Claude
                Just an FYI, for a cheap flat surface. Go to Lowe’s or Home Depot and checkout the marble tiles. Lay 2 face to face and pickup up only the top one; repeat with different pairs until you find a pair that stick together for a few seconds. This vacuum is caused by lack of air between them. Either one of these would provide you with a good flat surface for sandpaper sharpening. FYI Precision machinist height block stick together when they are clean and stacked for the same reason a vacuum.

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                • #23
                  One thing no one mentioned is the possibility of a flaw in the knife metal. Most steel produced today has some amount of scrap metal included in the mix. There is a chance that a fleck, grain, flake, or bit of harder material ended up on the edge of your new knife and caused the scratches. You solved it by working the edge (on sandpaper and/or strops). Things like that happen, and you've learned to deal with it.

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                  • #24
                    Yes, most of experience club members would be glad to fix it for you. Also check to see if you have any local knife makers.

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                    • #25
                      Could also be the wire edge and not a nick. I think a buffer is the trick.

                      Dave

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                      • #26
                        You may want to check you edge for micro chips with a magnifying glass. They can be had to see. It is surprising the noticeable scraches the can leave in a project.

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