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Making a reinterpretation of someone elses carvings.

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    I would be finishing it to keep on display as a constant reminder of what I wanted to achieve and to use it as a reference for the piece I wanted to make in the same style .

    I have a real thing for humming birds so would put one on each segmant of the sections between the leaf stems going to the centre piece in diffent poses for interest. The centre piece I would make as a bunch of trumpet flowers and that would be my version of the concept.

    Like Pallin indicated there are a thousand versions of a santa ornament and each person applies their own idea of how it might look. I think this falls in the same category.

    Cheers and have a great Xmas.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    By your own admission, it was a great learning experience. Good.
    I'm looking forward to seeing your "inspired" design next.

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  • Dileon
    replied
    Originally posted by rraposo View Post
    Here's a test "copy" i tried to make... Too start i think it's a bit too similar so i won't be finishing it, rather it will go into storage... However it did allow me to rethink my approach and I'm going to use an "adaptation" of his ideas... I'm posting my carving and his for comparison. It also tought me what not to do and a few other bits
    Wow you did awesome on it, now the next step is to create your own design using the techniques you learned. I would not throw that into storage but finish it and add it to your own personal collection. A great learning lessons that you choose. Shows you how capable you are which at times is a great reminder. Finish it, I would have that work in my living room for show off. As you go, people often want to see just how good you are, these kinds work although not your creation, show your talent in wood.
    Last edited by Dileon; 12-11-2020, 12:41 PM.

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  • rraposo
    replied
    Here's a test "copy" i tried to make... Too start i think it's a bit too similar so i won't be finishing it, rather it will go into storage... However it did allow me to rethink my approach and I'm going to use an "adaptation" of his ideas... I'm posting my carving and his for comparison. It also tought me what not to do and a few other bits
    Attached Files
    Last edited by rraposo; 12-11-2020, 12:31 PM.

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  • rraposo
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
    I googled Doolittle's art work. I can't imagine where to begin to copy those things.
    I suspect that his education as a molecular biologist colors the themes from time to time.
    Agreed. I find his pieces so... i lack the words to described them... i just get in awe.

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  • DrMikeL
    replied
    rraposo, what you are talking about is inspiration, not copying.
    All artists, musicians, etc., are inspired by the works of others.
    There is nothing wrong with that, it's how we learn and grow.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    I googled Doolittle's art work. I can't imagine where to begin to copy those things.
    I suspect that his education as a molecular biologist colors the themes from time to time.

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  • Dileon
    replied
    Agree with Merle, very few people in the world can copy someone work to complete likeness, although I do not believe it has anything to do with skills and has to do with each of us are so very different, what we see, what we feel, what we like and do not like makes us unique and so is the work we do.

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  • Merle Rice
    replied
    When I see a Picture of something that I would like to carve I try to make it Exactly as the Picture , but my Carving Skills does not Allow me to do that , so Consequently it becomes my Version . That's my Story and I'm sticking to it . Merle

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Art has been done in stylistic groups since time immemorial. Flat Plane, as an example.
    The four basic First Nations styles here in the Pacific Northwest.

    My carvings show my life's influence from First Nations work.
    At the same time, I do things which are uniquely mine.

    What are the significant points of distinction that set Doolittle's work apart from others?
    Import those with your own innovation and ingenuity.

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  • pallin
    replied
    Imagine someone copyrighting a Santa ornament woodcarving. Imagine someone suing for infringement.

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  • Nebraska
    replied
    For your consideration. https://www.thelegalartist.com/blog/...opyright-style

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  • Dileon
    replied
    Originally posted by rraposo View Post

    I will be selling the final works... But i know nothing about copyright or stuff like that. I also don't want to offend the original artist... Should i approach him before and ask for permission? I mean... there are lot's of artists that "do work in the image of... this chap or that chap..." It will never be an exact copy of his pieces.
    If it looks like his work, you may have a lawsuit on your hands, so if selling it, make sure you have changed it enough that when I look at the work, I can not say oh that is Mark's work. If you want to sell it and it looks like his work you needed to write permission to do so.

    On this note, some people do not care if you copy their work and will tell you to go ahead and try. Copywrite is a hot topic as one has to file a claim...but makes some artist mad, so trend carefully...LOL
    Last edited by Dileon; 12-10-2020, 11:32 AM.

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  • rraposo
    replied
    Awesome. Thank you for taking the time folks.

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  • Dileon
    replied
    Yes, you can copy work as long as you do not sell it or claim it as your own work. If you change it so it does not look like the original art and make your own work yes, you can copy it and sell it. You can copy the work completely also if you have permission from the person who made the work especially if you are showing the work to the public. What you're mainly asking is a copyright issue. Now for example if you copy work from Disney such as Mickey Mouse...you may have their attorneys banging on your door...they have zero toleration. When in art school we copy the masterworks often, in order to learn how to do it. We were not allowed to sell it nor claim it was as anything but a copy. It is although an awesome way to learn how to do that kind of carving.

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