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Barber strop vs block strop

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  • Brian T
    replied
    For honing crooked knives, I use office filing cards wrapped around metal tubing of various diameters, wooden dowels and dead chainsaw files.
    A wrap of electrical tape to secure each end.
    Mad scribble all over that with a bar of CrOx/AlOx (green) to make a very good loaded strop.
    The knife is stationary and the abrasive moves. You get used to it.

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  • Todd
    replied
    I purchased a strop board with leather on both sides. It does a nice job but after reading your comments on using a cereal box I thought I’d make one. Now that’s what I use and I love it

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  • pallin
    replied
    I have not used either form of leather strop for ten years or more. I free-hand sharpen on sandpapers (similar to Brian T) and finish with chromium oxide on cereal box cardboard.

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  • Jamie Sharp
    replied
    Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
    Something like this? You can see by the skid marks it has been used. the drawback is that you can't do the inside of a gouge, I use a fine diamond round file to do that
    Consider a dowel with compound smeared on it to do the inside.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Here is how I freehand sharpen all sweeps of gouges on flat abrasives.
    I stand up, the sharpening medium is clamped parallel to the edge of my bench.
    I paint the bevel with black felt marker so I can follow what's happening.
    I hold my arms tight to my sides so I sharpen from my knees, never from my elbows.

    You see the 20 degree angle card that I am trying to follow?
    I begin with one corner of the gouge on the stone and in each pass,
    I use my fingers to roll the gouge across the sweep so that I finish on the other corner.

    I show you a 5/35 on a 4,000 grit water stone, the metal tracks are easy to see.
    I do the same on the strop for the finish honing.
    I scrub CrOx honing compound on that folded piece of leather
    to make no more that 5 passes on the top of the bevel.
    Finish 5 35small.jpg Honingsmall.jpg

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    Something like this? You can see by the skid marks it has been used. the drawback is that you can't do the inside of a gouge, I use a fine diamond round file to do that
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
    This gallery has 1 photos.

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  • Todd
    replied
    Joepaulbutler
    great idea I’m going to try that.
    how about if Itake the appropriate size forester bit drill a block of wood then rip it in half follow up with the baby oil?

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  • VictorMet7
    replied
    Originally posted by Todd View Post
    Thanks I ordered a block strop.
    does it work fine?

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    You will not be sorry. For my gouges, I took some basswood, cut the inside and outside cures into the bloc, oiled the newly cut areas with baby oil, and use some Flexcut's yellow compound in the groves. I also have other strops that I use,, Of interested Let me know.

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  • Todd
    replied
    Thanks I ordered a block strop.

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    Block strop :-)>

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  • Brian T
    replied
    The barber's strop is intended for use with razors that have very shallow bevel angles. That's OK because the razor is expected to cut only wet protein (hair). Awkwardly large size, too.
    A very solid hard-based strop is convenient for the carver because you can hone just about any bevel angle that you can select.

    I use an office file card scribbled with chrome green honing compound. That is stuck to some hard flat base with dabs of masking tape. For crooked knives, I use a piece of pipe. For adzes, I use a tennis ball.

    Mechanically, the strop has to be quite hard so that the knife edge metal can't compress the strop and round off the edge.

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  • Todd
    started a topic Barber strop vs block strop

    Barber strop vs block strop

    I’m a beginner at wood carving and would like your opinions on which is easier to use a Barber strop or a Block strop?
    Thanks for any reply’s
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