Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Newbie looking for advice

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Eddy-Smiles Many thanks for that amazing list. Just wow.
    Always covered in chips.

    Comment


    • #17
      Thanks for the replies everyone I really appreciate the help here, and yeah that is an awesome list!

      Comment


      • #18
        No problem folks. Whenever I run across something that I think I may want or need to refer to at a later day I save. The attached PDF File apparently was the original list. It might be easier to save and work with for some folks. Just keep in mind that the list was compiled in 2009 and there is a lot of dead wood on it. But, what I've found is that by visiting other sites on the list there are new links to follow so it's sort of like a treasure hunt. Carvers Resources.pdf
        Attached Files
        Last edited by Eddy-Smiles; 04-02-2021, 10:48 AM.

        Comment


        • #19
          Thanks for the links, Brian. Tom LaFortune videos very interesting. How did he attach the arms (didn't see anything in the video)? I'm assuming glue and a large dowel...

          Claude
          My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

          My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

          My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

          Comment


          • #20
            There were a lot of loose ends to tie up in the third video. Even the paint. Not well edited.
            What we see now is about the 3rd or 4th iteration of video.

            What bugged me was I wanted to watch the knife work. See the blade sweeps for the wood contours. Instead, it got speeded up and the actual carving work was hidden in Tom's hands.
            The 5 carving videos from the most recent Carving On The Edge Festival have better parts, even texturing surfaces (hidden in the last half of the Safety video.)

            Indoors or out, those figures had large wooden pegs for assembly. Many stood on the ocean beach fronts of the coastal villages. If the peg rots away, those figures get repaired, unlike totem poles that lay where they fall. That's a metaphor for life.
            Brian T

            Comment


            • #21
              Woodcarving is many things - from whittling to sculpture - and most of us do not try to do them all. We choose what gives us satisfaction and focus on the tools, designs, wood & techniques applicable to that niche. Be aware that some First Nations symbols are considered proprietary to their family or tribe. Probably not a problem for designs you find in public sources.

              Following the advice on Brian T's postings, learn how to find any member's project photos by going to their profile and searching their media.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                There were a lot of loose ends to tie up in the third video. Even the paint. Not well edited.
                What we see now is about the 3rd or 4th iteration of video.

                What bugged me was I wanted to watch the knife work. See the blade sweeps for the wood contours. Instead, it got speeded up and the actual carving work was hidden in Tom's hands..
                I did see when he used the knives that the blade was sharp on both sides. He could cut up or down by a mere tilt of his hands. The techniques were quite interesting. I agree, though, that much of the time, knife work was hidden by his hands - can't blame
                Tom, but the cameraman should have known better and moved...

                Claude
                My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

                Comment


                • #23
                  In the strictest sense, PacNW First Nations crooked knives always have both beveled edges
                  You can work, push or pull, with either hand. You see them carve with the off-hand thumb used as a fulcrum for "rocking" slicing cuts. I'm getting better at doing this. Even after some years, I still have to remind myself not to use a palm up, fist grip.

                  Before I became acquainted with the blade-smiths of the PacNW, I was building my knives from Farrier's hooked hoof trimming knives. They have just a single bevel cutting edge so I needed to buy/find both the RH and the LH (rare) knives to make up a pair. Then I work with one in each hand.
                  I liked that because I got all the handles of a size to fit my hands for comfort.
                  Here are some of those pairs:
                  HaidaC.JPG
                  Brian T

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Hi Hax
                    Can see you are getting heaps of good advice so would just wish you happy carving and welcome aboard to the forum. Look forward to seeing your work.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X