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Pfeil Sweep Gouges Question:

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  • #16
    I was gifted a leather belt so stiff that it just about stands up by itself. I cut it into 3-4" pieces and shaped one long edge rounded and others a Vee. Then scrub those contoured edges into a bar of chrome green. I was taught to use 3-4 gently swipes to hone the inside of a gouge. It does not matter that the strokes are diagonal or straight.
    Brian T

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    • #17
      The LPB: I have no answer as to source. I have seen several pages on internet sites that I have lost.
      I do recall my surprise to see linen lace patterns defined.
      Brian T

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      • #18
        Interesting conversation. Like pallin I use a rounded sid of a slip stone. I have also used a section of cardbord with compound andeither rapped it around a dowel near the shap of the gouge or folded or bent it to fit the inside of a gouge. I have never seen the need but I have a friend that marked the edge of a 1"x 2" and shaped the wood to fit the I D of a number of gouges and attached leather. What ever works for you is what you should do. We all have our own ways that work for us.
        We live in the land of the free because of the brave!
        https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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        • #19
          This may be the most convoluted thread ever, filled with vagaries and assumptions spiraling to nowhere just like Fibonacci curve.
          Ed
          https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood
          Local club
          https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Nebraska View Post
            This may be the most convoluted thread ever, filled with vagaries and assumptions spiraling to nowhere just like Fibonacci curve.
            Hey, Ed, where do you think black holes come from?
            Arthur

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            • #21
              Someone gave me this data some years back. Hopefully, it will help you.
              Claude
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              • #22
                Claud...... You truly are a Santa!
                Many thanks!!! This is exactly what I needed.
                I can't thank you enough.
                All the best,
                John
                Last edited by johnvansyckel; 09-03-2021, 09:29 PM.

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                • #23
                  I notice the charts that Claude has shared with you have no specs for #2 gouges, nor is there any notation of what standard is represented by the chart. Could it be the London Pattern Book? Note also the significant difference in the arc angles for #7 and #8 gouges (from what I had found for my Pfeil gouges).

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                  • #24
                    I too noticed the difference and think this may be related to the difference.

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                    • #25
                      #2 is barely a sweep, for smoothing and texturing surfaces.
                      #3 is more obvious.
                      #5, like a 5/35, makes a nice dig.
                      Any #7, even a Stubai 7/75 adze, makes a serious dig.
                      #9, such as a 9/15, needs a big mallet and takes a serious bite, every time.

                      I can duplicate most of those cuts with a D adze and a couple of crooked knives.
                      Plus, I can carve straight flat sides square to the flat bottoms of dishes with ease.
                      Euro-gouges are too clumsy unless you own a lot of tracery-bent.

                      When you get into the University of British Columbia, Museum of Anthropology, you will find Bill Reid's Raven and the First Men in the rotunda. More that 140 perfect pieces of yellow cedar in the glue up.
                      Go late in a sunny day. The sky light will show you that the entire carving us textured. Maybe a #2.

                      https://moa.ubc.ca/2020/01/the-raven...to-completion/
                      Brian T

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                      • #26
                        I have found the answer to my question here..
                        http://www.woodcentral.com/woodworki...lating-sweeps/

                        Given the radius the arc angle can be easily calculated for any gouge.

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                        • #27
                          The data below is the complete answer to the question and explains the difference between Ed and Clauds input.
                          Sheffield List & London Pattern

                          Sweep # (Ashley)
                          Gouge width Multiplier to find the Radius European

                          Sweep #

                          (Pfeil 2 Cheries)
                          Arc

                          Angle
                          #3 3.75 #3 15.32º
                          #4 2.25 #4 25.68º
                          1.5 #5 38.94º
                          #5 1.125 #6 52.78º
                          #6 .75 #7 83.62º
                          #7 .625 106.26º
                          #8 .5625 #8 125.47º
                          #9 .5 #9 180.00º
                          Thanks to all for your guidance.It makes sense because the angles are a linear increase.
                          Last edited by johnvansyckel; 09-06-2021, 12:40 AM.

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                          • #28
                            I have a couple of notes to add to your Pfeil Mapping Chart (see #24): The #11 gouge is half an ellipse as cut through the shorter dimension. The #14 parting tool is 55 degrees, but unlike the other V-tools, the apex is rounded. There is a #16 V-tool - 35 degrees. There are also Staehli gouges (3) which are V-tools with curved sides (wings). These inputs are taken from a Pfeil catalog that I got in Switzerland in 2001. As I mentioned earlier, Pfeil did not offer #4 or #6 at that time (in that catalog.)

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                            • #29
                              All I can add is WOW! I didn't know I would have to do math! I think some of you folks are thinking too hard.
                              Just my $.02 others may differ.
                              Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
                              My FB page:https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...7196480&type=3

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                              • #30

                                Steve, your 2 cents is GOLDEN. I must agree! BUT, I found a real jewel in this thread where Brian (see #24) enlightened me with the use of bent knives and a D adze eliminating the use of all gouges…..GENIUS!! Sadly Bill Reid’s (and Brian’s) methods have gone unnoticed or at least not received the recognition they deserve. Wanting to try a bent knife, I was only able to find 1 maker. I’ll be placing my order for a #3 with http://www.kestreltool.com/the-kestrel-crooked-knife and can’t wait to give it a go.
                                Last edited by johnvansyckel; 09-06-2021, 03:01 PM.

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