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Tackling bigger carvings

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  • chagorhan
    replied
    Originally posted by Merle Rice View Post
    I think you are making it more Difficult than it really is and loosing Confidence in yourself . The Best way to get Answers for your Questions is to find a Design that is the size you like and has a Simple Procedure to complete. If it doesn't turn out as good as you want , throw it away and get another Piece of Wood and go at again . Just remember it's just a Piece of Wood . Relax and Enjoy this Hobby . Practice , it will come . Merle
    Great kind words Merle. Yes it is JUST wood, I started this for pleasure and to continue in my grand fathers footsteps.

    Leave a comment:


  • Merle Rice
    replied
    I think you are making it more Difficult than it really is and loosing Confidence in yourself . The Best way to get Answers for your Questions is to find a Design that is the size you like and has a Simple Procedure to complete. If it doesn't turn out as good as you want , throw it away and get another Piece of Wood and go at again . Just remember it's just a Piece of Wood . Relax and Enjoy this Hobby . Practice , it will come . Merle

    Leave a comment:


  • chagorhan
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
    Question: have the flat planes expanded in proportion to the increase in carving size?

    This time, I think you should figure out a way to tie the carving down. With the forces involved, not a hand-held project. Mallet? 1" chisels? 1/2" pair of skews? Possibly a 2/30 gouge?

    Buy a roll of that non-skid kitchen cupboard liner stuff. Sort of a foam rubber mesh. I've always got a piece under every carving I'm doing. It loses its "stick" with wood dust but washes up just fine with fresh soapy kitchen dish-washing suds.

    Rig up some kind of padding to use with a really big 'C' clamp.
    Brian I have never used any other tools besides some palm gouges my grandfather had and a couple of the lee valley/ craft store knives.

    Leave a comment:


  • chagorhan
    replied
    Originally posted by Nebraska View Post
    Congratulations for choosing to tackle a different challenge.

    First recommendation is to use a carving vise it has lots of advantages. I’m partial to Wilton pow-r-arms. But there are lots of options.
    52E4F372-6046-451C-95A5-35B1DF4292D6.jpeg

    More to your question I carve from photo or sketches the are scaled to the size of the carving I’m doing. These become my reference material. If you print them on a transparency you can hold it to the wood to mark where to cut next. Also using calipers you can take measurements from the photo to the wood.
    3BAD7D23-E018-49B0-9AFE-67079E746707.jpeg
    Ed I like the idea of the transparency. I started by tracing the pattern to a piece of paper then cut out the bulk on the band saw. Then i stopped and stood back and questioned whether i bit off more then i could chew

    Leave a comment:


  • chagorhan
    replied
    Originally posted by Tom Ellis View Post
    Gord, Just make your chips twice as big as the three inch guys.
    Thats what im terrified about, making big chips! with the little guys i usually just end up with sawdust

    Leave a comment:


  • Nebraska
    replied
    Congratulations for choosing to tackle a different challenge.

    First recommendation is to use a carving vise it has lots of advantages. I’m partial to Wilton pow-r-arms. But there are lots of options.
    52E4F372-6046-451C-95A5-35B1DF4292D6.jpeg

    More to your question I carve from photo or sketches the are scaled to the size of the carving I’m doing. These become my reference material. If you print them on a transparency you can hold it to the wood to mark where to cut next. Also using calipers you can take measurements from the photo to the wood.
    3BAD7D23-E018-49B0-9AFE-67079E746707.jpeg

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    Question: have the flat planes expanded in proportion to the increase in carving size?

    This time, I think you should figure out a way to tie the carving down. With the forces involved, not a hand-held project. Mallet? 1" chisels? 1/2" pair of skews? Possibly a 2/30 gouge?

    Buy a roll of that non-skid kitchen cupboard liner stuff. Sort of a foam rubber mesh. I've always got a piece under every carving I'm doing. It loses its "stick" with wood dust but washes up just fine with fresh soapy kitchen dish-washing suds.

    Rig up some kind of padding to use with a really big 'C' clamp.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom Ellis
    replied
    Gord, Just make your chips twice as big as the three inch guys.

    Leave a comment:


  • chagorhan
    started a topic Tackling bigger carvings

    Tackling bigger carvings

    Hi everyone. I got a Harley Refsal book and wanted to try a “big” flat plane carving, but am very intimidated. Besides the one cut at a time, how do other people tackle 6-8” carvings.

    for reference I’ve only ever did little 2-3 inch guys as seem in other posts, or the 5minute wizard

    Gord
    Last edited by chagorhan; 09-24-2021, 08:41 AM.
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