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  • Pattern sizing question

    I am fairly new to both woodcarving and scrollsawing. I see many times someone will say \"increase or decrease the pattern size on copy machine\". I have a Canon copy/scan machine and it doesn\'t allow me to set a % size up or down. It has a couple of factory settings but not what I might necessarily need. Can anybody give me some advice on how to go about resizing a pattern? Do I need to do from within a program on my computer? Is there a suggested pattern sizing program that you all recommend? I\'d sure love to hear how you all do it. I have a ton of basswood blocks that I acquired but they are never quite the right size for the project. Usually they are just a bit smaller so I thought if I could scale down the patterns I might be able to use the wood. Thanks for your help,,

    Ray

  • #2
    Re: Pattern sizing question

    Hi, Ray - I moved your post to a different forum where you are more likely to get some answers.

    One method is to take your pattern to local Kinkos or other copy service and get them to do it. You could also go to the local library and use one of the copiers there.

    It can also be done on your computer if your home printer also has a scanning function. Many home printers will change the size of something. I have an EPSON WorkForce 520 that will. You can also use several different computer applications to change the size of an image. On a Mac, you can use Preview which is built-in, or Adobe Illustrator ($$), or Adobe Photoshop ($$$), or Adobe Photoshop Elements ($). On the PC, there are numerous photo editing applications that can be used, but you\'ll have to wait for someone else to tell you about them, as I use a Mac.

    Claude
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    • #3
      Re: Pattern sizing question

      A simple program like MS Paint will allow you to import any picture you\'ve scanned and then increase or decrease the size of the picture but you have to play a bit with it. It\'s free and it\'s relatively easy. Just my two cents or $0.02 as JoeB would say.

      Tinwood

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      • #4
        Re: Pattern sizing question

        Thanks, I inadvertently posted it here. I have no idea why. I copied and pasted it into the beginners forum so it is probably posted more than once. If you could check it out and make the necessary changes/deletions, I\'d be most appreciative.

        Thanks.

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        • #5
          Re: Pattern copy/sizing question

          In the case of having a pattern I want to resize, I would scan an image of it into an image processing program, I use Irfanview, it is free, then use the resize function to set the image to the size I want. I can then print it at actual size, usually several copies so I can use one to stick to the blank for band-sawing and another for reference.

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          • #6
            Re: Pattern copy/sizing question

            Thanks for the info Steev. I have that program loaded on my computer, but have never used it ???? I use a program called Snagit, but I will be investigating tomorrow. . . JoeB
            . . .JoeB

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            • #7
              Re: Pattern copy/sizing question

              From time to time, I use the copy machines at Staples to make any % that I need.

              Another possibility is what\'s called \"restricted design\" where body parts are moved to fit the size of the available wood. I had a nice fish drawing but the head and tail hung over the edge of the available wood. So I cut off both and moved them into otherwise blank/waste areas of the wood.
              Brian T

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              • #8
                Re: Pattern copy/sizing question

                As far as resizing patterns, it comes down to simple proportional fractions. Say you have a pattern that is for a 6” figure and you have a 4” block of wood…you simply make 4 the numerator and 6 the divisor and come up with a pattern that is 67% of the original.

                Conversely, if you want to make a 6” figure out of a 4” pattern, you do the opposite, and make the pattern 150% of the original.

                This works with whatever proportions you want to use, so you don’t have to use complicated sizing programs to repurpose your pattern.

                THEN, you just have to find a copier, set the resizing percentage and make it work!
                Last edited by Claude; 02-25-2016, 02:37 PM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Pattern sizing question

                  Sometimes the paper sizes of a copier will limit how much of an enlargement can be printed on a sheet. In this case you may have to make prints of portions of the original pattern and tape the pieces together.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Pattern sizing question

                    SHHHHH! That\'s the trick! The copiers at Staples have 11x17 max.

                    The other option is to use a pantograph to scale up/down your original drawing (Lee Valley # 07K06.01.) I replaced all of the lightweight wooden arms with aluminum. For big paper, I have what\'s called a \"banquet roll,\" used to cover cheap plywood tables, it\'s 36\" wide and 100\' long. Cost much less than I expected.
                    Brian T

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                    • #11
                      Re: Pattern sizing question

                      I take a scan that has the front/back and profile on it. Use the crop option to crop the front/back as closely as possible. Save it as a new save then go back to the original and crop the profile as same as the front/back then save as new. When printing, if I want a 5in. tall pattern I adjust the height of the front/back to 5ins. Do the same to the profile. If you keep the sizing proportional, you\\\'ll come up with two pics the same size. It isn\'t near as difficult as it sounds. Hope this helps.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Pattern sizing question

                        Like Robson Valley suggested, a pantograph is a good way to go, but here is what I do. It\'s very unorthodox but here it is. I first take a photo of the pattern with a digital camera or an iphone. Then I email it to my computer. Save it as a jpg file and and add it to a Publisher page where you can adjust the size. Then just print the Publisher page. See, I told you it\'s unorthodox but it works great for me!
                        Keep On Carvin'
                        Bob K.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Pattern sizing question

                          Wow, so much great info and help. Thanks to all of you. I used to use Irfanview years ago but had forgotten about it. I will install it right away and give it a try. Thanks again and I\'m sorry for the triple posting. I was having a hard time finding where and how to start a new thread. Now, I have it.

                          Ray

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                          • #14
                            I want to start my new business..I want to buy 2-3 copiers.. Can you tell me Which is the best and is it in budget??? Please recommend me I am waiting for your reply.... Thanks..........

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                            • #15
                              Mandii - There is nothing in this discussion recommending that you buy copiers to resize carving patterns. These services are readily available to most of us woodcarvers.

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