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"Stupid is as stupid does"..................Duh!

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Nomad View Post
    Eddy, I have to compliment you on your covert trauma treatment. ER worthy. Hope there was no permanent damage. You might try wrapping some of that wimp wrap (carver's tape) around a couple of your glove fingers. That stuff is very difficult to cut. Better than any glove material I've ever used.
    Nomad.... No permanent damage according to the Doc! It's not numb and I can still bend it so I guess I was lucky She checked all those things out. There are three doctors in the practice and I've made them all bears. This is not the first time they've seen me attempt one of my "Yakuza" ceremonies on a finger! And your right. If I'd had a wrap or two of Vet Tape on that finger it would have slowed the knife down, but better yet is next time to wear the "gosh darn" stainless steel gloves. Nothing short of wire cutters penetrates them.

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    • #17
      The s/s gloves aren't so hot for a stab cut. You can still get poked pretty good.
      But if you mess with fresh fish all day with knives made from hack saw blades, they are really nice against slicing motions.
      Odd but they don't seem to get cold.

      We were 30-40 miles by river from the nearest road.
      We wore 5-finger s/s gloves on each hand.
      If I carved in your style, I'd have bought a pair, long ago.

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      • #18
        Well Ed, it only hurts for a little while or so the song goes. We'll be back in Fla in about 2 weeks hope to see you at carving.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
          The s/s gloves aren't so hot for a stab cut. You can still get poked pretty good.
          But if you mess with fresh fish all day with knives made from hack saw blades, they are really nice against slicing motions.
          Odd but they don't seem to get cold.

          We were 30-40 miles by river from the nearest road.
          We wore 5-finger s/s gloves on each hand.
          If I carved in your style, I'd have bought a pair, long ago.
          Robson... I've measured my knives for my wife's peace of mind and the tips only poke through the stainless steel gloves an average of 1/16". Granted, if you penetrated the gloves and then dragged the knife across your hand you'd add to the damage but a 1/16" poke in itself isn't all that life threatening. And I am thinking about getting a second glove.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by TreeWizard View Post
            Well Ed, it only hurts for a little while or so the song goes. We'll be back in Fla in about 2 weeks hope to see you at carving.
            Howdy Paul! I was singing but it wasn't that song! Ha! Ha! Yeah! I've got to get back to carving. I keep meaning to get down there but something always gets schedule on that morning.

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            • #21
              To some extent, it depends on what you get used to. I know that s/s gloves are not cheap but as cheap insurance, hard to beat.

              I did not begin to carve with gloves on. First I noticed that the gloves kept the carvings cleaner. Then cold hands and stiff fingers, then mallet pounding vibrations.
              Then bulking up skinny tools for arthritic fingers. Western Red Cedar slivers are barbed, no concerns now.

              They're some sort of really thin leather with a cloth liner. Cheap. I think the warmth for cold hands has to be #1.
              When they get dirty and they do, they are the fastest and most convenient quick strop in the shop.
              I know they're really too soft but 3-4 passes really puts edges back to carving sharp.

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              • #22
                Cutting corners can be expensive.

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                • #23
                  Blood thinners and carving can be a real issue. I was in the drug store the other day and noticed they have several bleed stopping products. One is a powder and then their are bandaids by Curad I think that are supposed have something in them to stop bleeding. I bought a pack of the bandaids and slipped them in the bag I take to carving class. One of the members is on blood so I figured they might come in handy.
                  Last edited by fiddlesticks; 10-02-2017, 07:56 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by fiddlesticks View Post
                    Blood thinners and carving can be a real issue. I was in the drug store the other day and noticed they have several bleed stopping products. One is a powder and then their are bandaids by Curad I think that are supposed have something in them to stop bleeding. I bought a pack of the bandaids and slipped them in the bag I take to carving class. One of the members is on blood so I figured they might come in handy.
                    Fiddlesticks.... I actually have a couple of packets of that coagulant powder from when I went on blood thinners the first time a couple of years back. I'm not sure if it's still good or not. But that's a real good idea; to update my first aid kit with some newer product. I haven't seen the Curad band aids. I've never been a fan of Curad products as they don't seem to stick very well.

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                    • #25
                      I remember when I was a young 2-3 year old - You know before IKE - we had battle ribbons to show off our cuts. Stark colors in stripes. BandAid as I recall - maybe Curad. Lasted a few years and then again in the 70's. Have to look those up and get a pack. I am using my supplied set in a plastic pouch that came with my grinder. It sharpens and the tools are ready to cut. I had to warn the beloved that her knives were very sharp and to watch out putting to much push on the kitchen knives. She keeps them in a slotted cork now, not cutting each other in the drawer. That powder sounds like power stuff one puts in a stick for shaving. Sounds good to have just in case of a scrape or a cut. Martin

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by lionslair View Post
                        I remember when I was a young 2-3 year old - You know before IKE - we had battle ribbons to show off our cuts. Stark colors in stripes. BandAid as I recall - maybe Curad. Lasted a few years and then again in the 70's. Have to look those up and get a pack. I am using my supplied set in a plastic pouch that came with my grinder. It sharpens and the tools are ready to cut. I had to warn the beloved that her knives were very sharp and to watch out putting to much push on the kitchen knives. She keeps them in a slotted cork now, not cutting each other in the drawer. That powder sounds like power stuff one puts in a stick for shaving. Sounds good to have just in case of a scrape or a cut. Martin
                        Lionslair..... The brand name of the stuff I have is QuickClot. It's a one shot envelope. But I looked on Amazon and they sell it and another brand, "Celox", where you can purchase the same amount in multiple packets. I believe this would be much more advantageous. Once the big packet is opened it's useless.

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                        • #27
                          Eddy - Thank you for the heads up and product names. I ordered some for the house and the Library/office/work room/game room. The latter is a large 3 room money pit!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by lionslair View Post
                            Eddy - Thank you for the heads up and product names. I ordered some for the house and the Library/office/work room/game room. The latter is a large 3 room money pit!
                            Lionslair.... No problem my friend. The next time I make an Amazon order I think I may order a pack of the small multi-packs and put one or two in the little first aid kit my wife carries in her pocket book. So we both benefited from the research.

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                            • #29
                              What I decided and got my wife to agree - make a small purse size GO Bag. Inside will have some of these packs 3 or 4, bandages (gauze) bandages and tape and the kitchen sink if room. Likely a small can of spray antiseptic . We are 70 years old and I figure a bag like that can come to the person outside or in another place. We have acreage and both mow grass and fields. If a brush scratches us across the arm or leg it might be just the thing. I'll keep my own kit in my carving desk. Sometimes one can be driving towards the house to meet the medic in route! Martin

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                              • #30
                                TThere are always those times when we can't seem to avoid the working end of a knife or chisel. But I always have my small first aid pack with butterfly stitch strips. Glad your cut was not to bad Eddy. I have had two chain mail gloves and they were just uncomfortable to wear. The fingers were too long for my short hand. I found a Kevlar glove with leather covered palm and fingers that has worked well for me for some time.

                                Randy

                                WE LIVE IN THE LAND OF THE FREE BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE!

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